Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Digital Communication Systems » Shannon's Noisy Channel Coding Theorem

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • Rice Digital Scholarship

    This collection is included in aLens by: Digital Scholarship at Rice University

    Click the "Rice Digital Scholarship" link to see all content affiliated with them.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.
 

Shannon's Noisy Channel Coding Theorem

Module by: Behnaam Aazhang. E-mail the author

Summary: A statement of Shannon's noisy channel coding theorem.

It is highly recommended that the information presented in Mutual Information and in Typical Sequences be reviewed before proceeding with this document. An introductory module on the theorem is available at Noisy Channel Theorems .

Theorem 1: Shannon's Noisy Channel Coding

The capacity of a discrete-memoryless channel is given by

C=max p X x X;Y p X x C p X x p X x X Y
(1)
where X;Y X Y is the mutual information between the channel input XX and the output YY. If the transmission rate RR is less than CC, then for any ε>0 ε 0 there exists a code with block length nn large enough whose error probability is less than εε. If R>C R C , the error probability of any code with any block length is bounded away from zero.

Example 1

If we have a binary symmetric channel with cross over probability 0.1, then the capacity C0.5 C 0.5 bits per transmission. Therefore, it is possible to send 0.4 bits per channel through the channel reliably. This means that we can take 400 information bits and map them into a code of length 1000 bits. Then the whole code can be transmitted over the channels. One hundred of those bits may be detected incorrectly but the 400 information bits may be decoded correctly.

Before we consider continuous-time additive white Gaussian channels, let's concentrate on discrete-time Gaussian channels

Y i = X i + η i Y i X i η i
(2)
where the X i X i 's are information bearing random variables and η i η i is a Gaussian random variable with variance σ η 2 σ η 2 . The input X i X i 's are constrained to have power less than PP
1n i =1n X i 2P 1 n i 1 n X i 2 P
(3)

Consider an output block of size nn

Y=X+η Y X η
(4)
For large nn, by the Law of Large Numbers,
1n i =1n η i 2=1n i =1n| y i x i |2 σ η 2 1 n i 1 n η i 2 1 n i 1 n y i x i 2 σ η 2
(5)
This indicates that with large probability as nn approaches infinity, YY will be located in an nn-dimensional sphere of radius n σ η 2 n σ η 2 centered about XX since |yx|2n σ η 2 y x 2 n σ η 2

On the other hand since X i X i 's are power constrained and η i η i and X i X i 's are independent

1n i =1n y i 2P+ σ η 2 1 n i 1 n y i 2 P σ η 2
(6)
|Y|n(P+ σ η 2) Y n P σ η 2
(7)
This mean YY is in a sphere of radius n(P+ σ η 2) n P σ η 2 centered around the origin.

How many XX's can we transmit to have nonoverlapping YY spheres in the output domain? The question is how many spheres of radius n σ η 2 n σ η 2 fit in a sphere of radius n(P+ σ η 2) n P σ η 2 .

M=n( σ η 2+P)nn σ η 2n=1+P σ η 2n2 M n σ η 2 P n n σ η 2 n 1 P σ η 2 n 2
(8)

Figure 1
Figure 1 (Figure7-46.png)

Exercise 1

How many bits of information can one send in nn uses of the channel?

Solution

log 2 1+P σ η 2n2 2 1 P σ η 2 n 2
(9)

The capacity of a discrete-time Gaussian channel C=12log 2 (1+P σ η 2) C 1 2 2 1 P σ η 2 bits per channel use.

When the channel is a continuous-time, bandlimited, additive white Gaussian with noise power spectral density N 0 2 N 0 2 and input power constraint PP and bandwidth WW. The system can be sampled at the Nyquist rate to provide power per sample PP and noise power

σ η 2=WW N 0 2d f =W N 0 σ η 2 f W W N 0 2 W N 0
(10)
The channel capacity 12log 2 (1+P N 0 W) 1 2 2 1 P N 0 W bits per transmission. Since the sampling rate is 2W 2 W , then
C=2W2log 2 (1+P N 0 W)  bits/trans. x trans./sec C 2 W 2 2 1 P N 0 W  bits/trans. x trans./sec
(11)
C=Wlog 2 (1+P N 0 W)bitssec C W 2 1 P N 0 W bits sec
(12)

Example 2

The capacity of the voice band of a telephone channel can be determined using the Gaussian model. The bandwidth is 3000 Hz and the signal to noise ratio is often 30 dB. Therefore,

C=3000log 2 (1+1000)30000bitssec C 3000 2 1 1000 30000 bits sec
(13)
One should not expect to design modems faster than 30 Kbs using this model of telephone channels. It is also interesting to note that since the signal to noise ratio is large, we are expecting to transmit 10 bits/second/Hertz across telephone channels.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks