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LabVIEW Demonstrations in Connexions

Module by: Prashant Singh. E-mail the author

Summary: A collection of demonstrations that were implemented using LabVIEW.

Many of the following demonstrations are included in various Connexions modules. We provide this collection for your convenience. The demonstrations have all been created using LabVIEW, but one only needs the Run-Time Engine and a small helper application to use them. Please see this document for instructions on how to use these demonstrations.

Example 1: Change of Basis

The following demonstration allows you to explore changing the basis used to represent a vector. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 2: Complex Numbers

The following demonstration allows you to explore the complex plane and look at the different ways of representing complex numbers. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 3: DFT Approximation

The following demonstration illustrates the approximation of a signal using low-frequency DFT components. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 4: DFT approaching DTFT

The following demonstration illustrates how the DFT approaches the DTFT as more frequencies are calculated. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 5: Discrete-time Complex Exponential

The following demonstration illustrates the complex exponential in discrete time. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 6: Discrete-time Convolution

The following demonstrations allows you to explore the steps for graphically convolving two discrete-time signals. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 7: Discrete-time Inner Product

The following demonstration allows you to compute the inner product of two discrete-time signals. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 8: Non-linear, Time-varying: Discrete-time

The following example demonstrates non-linear and time-varying discrete-time systems. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 9: Discrete-time Signal Norm

The following demonstration allows you to compute norms of discrete-time signals. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 10: Vector Inner Product

The following demonstration allows you to compute the inner product between two vectors. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 11: Linear Transformation

The following demonstration lets you see the effect of applying a linear transformation on a vector. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 12: Non-linear, Time-varying: Continuous-time

The following example demonstrates a non-linear and a time-varying continuous-time system. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 13: Vector Norm

The following demonstration allows you to calculate norms of a vector. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 14: Phase Shift vs. Time Delay

The following demonstration illustrates the difference between phase shift and time delay in periodic signals. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 15: Properties of Periodic Signals

The following demonstration allows you to explore properties of periodic signals such as frequency, amplitude, and phase. It also helps illustrate the relationship between phase shift and time delay. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 16: Continuous-Time Complex Exponential

The following demonstration allows you to see how the argument changes the shape of the complex exponential. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 17: Discrete-time Circular Convolution

The following demonstration allows you to explore this algorithm for circular convolution. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 18: DFT Signal Analysis

Use this demonstration to perform DFT analysis of a signal.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 19: DFT Signal Synthesis

Use this demonstration to synthesize a signal from a DFT sequence.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 20: Continuous-time Convolution

This demonstration illustrates the graphical method for convolution. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 21: Fourier Synthesis

This demonstration lets you synthesize a signal by combining sinusoids, similar to the synthesis equation for the Fourier series. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 22: Signal Approximation

This demonstration explores approximation using a Fourier basis and a Haar Wavelet basis.See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

Example 23: Haar Synthesis

This demonstration lets you create a signal by combining Haar basis functions, illustrating the synthesis equation of the Haar Wavelet Transform. See here for instructions on how to use the demo.

LabVIEW Example: (run) (source)

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