Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Microcontroller and Embedded Systems Laboratory » Structure of an Assembly Program

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • TI MSP430 display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Texas Instruments MSP430
    By: Texas Instruments

    Comments:

    "Basic introduction to microcontroller-based embedded systems development. Includes structured laboratory exercises in the following areas: assembly programming, C language programming, peripheral […]"

    Click the "TI MSP430" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Structure of an Assembly Program

Module by: CJ Ganier. E-mail the author

Summary: Explains the structure of an assembly language program.

The assembly program begins execution at the reset interrupt. The reset interrupt is the first thing that occurs when power is given to the processor. By default in the Rowley files, the reset interrupt is loaded to send the execution of the program to the start of the .code segment. Until a branch is reached, the processor will execute each instruction in turn. If the program does not loop back to an earlier point to keep going, eventually the execution will reach the end of the valid instructions in memory. You should never let this happen.

The control of a programs execution is called control flow, and it is accomplished through branching, jumping, function calls, and interrupts. Interrupts are the subject of future labs. Branching and jumping refer to changing the next instruction from the next one sequentially to an instruction elsewhere in the program. By branching to an instruction above the branch itself you can cause the program to repeat itself. This is a basic loop in assembly. Branches can also be conditional. In the MSP architecture conditional branches are generally dependent on the status register (SR) bits to decide whether to execute the next instruction after the branch or the instruction the branch specifies. Many arithmetic and logical operations can set the relevant bits in the status register; check the MSP430 User’s Guide for which ones you will need.

Once you understand the basics of assembly you should be able to write some simple routines.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks