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Audio Localization Problem Motivation and Goal

Module by: Elizabeth Gregory, Joseph Cole. E-mail the authors

Summary: In this section, we will go over the possible application area of our project, as well as the objective.

Possible Application Areas

Audio localization has quite a few applications in the real world. In particular, such as system can be used in a home automation system to identify a person's location. Also, this project has applications in sonar and radar systems.

Objective

In this project we would like to:

  • Accurately determine the origin of a sine wave to within 22.5°
  • Adjust to real-time change in the signal location
However, first we need to set a few parameters. Firstly, our field-of-view is the half plane in front of the array and only deals with the azimuth, not the elevation. Secondly, as we will learn in Beamforming Theory, the signal will have to originate in the far-field. Figure 1 shows how our set-up will work.

Figure 1: The star represents our far-field source. The black circles represent microphones. The area shaded in green represents the correct region. The areas shaded in yellow represent our margin of error. The areas shaded in red represent the incorrect areas.
The Setup
The Setup (Figure1.jpg)

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

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