Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax_CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Nature and Context of Educational Administration » Toward a Leadership Practice Field

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Endorsed by Endorsed (What does "Endorsed by" mean?)

This content has been endorsed by the organizations listed. Click each link for a list of all content endorsed by the organization.
  • NCPEA display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: National Council of Professors of Educational Administration
    By: National Council of Professors of Educational Administration

    Click the "NCPEA" link to see all content they endorse.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Toward a Leadership Practice Field

Module by: Theodore Creighton. E-mail the author

Summary: This article explores the possibility of providing potential administrators an opportunity to practice and perfect their administrative skills before they face the challenge of the “real world.” Other professions have practice fields. Why shouldn’t we have administrator-training programs?

logo.gif
This module has been peer-reviewed, accepted, and sanctioned by the National Council of the Professors of Educational Administration (NCPEA) as a scholarly contribution to the knowledge base in educational administration

Toward a Leadership Practice Field: An Antidote to an Ailing Internship Experience

by Theodore Creighton

The field of education leadership has long been criticized for the ways in which men and women are prepared for school leadership positions. In 1960, The American Association of School Administrators (AASA) characterized the preparation of superintendents and principals as a “dismal montage.” Later, Farquhar and Piele (1972) described university-based preparation programs as “ dysfunctional structural incrementalism.” In 1990, Pitner discussed the “zombie programs” in education leadership. As recently as 1999, McCarthy addressed the issue of change in education administration by stating, “Congeniality and complacency are woven into education administration programs, and the majority of faculty do not perceive a need for radical change that would bring about a transformation in education leadership.” Now, forty years after AASA’s alert, Murphy (2001) points to the profession’s continued focus on technical knowledge, placing the university in the center of the field. He posits, “Trying to link theory and practice in school administration has been, for the last 30 years, a little like attempting to start a car with a dead battery: The odds are fairly long that the engine will ever turn over.” Murphy identifies the central problem as our fascination with building an academic infrastructure of school administration, which has produced serious distortions, in what is primarily an applied field. The traditional internship presently serves as the vehicle for aspiring principals to practice their problem-solving and instructional leadership skills. Though there has been emphasis from the professional organizations (AASA, NAESP, NASSP, NCPEA, UCEA) for extending the internship experience over more time (e.g., one-year) and weaving the internship throughout preparation coursework, the internship still remains a weak experience with a minimal practice field at best. For some time, I have argued for the implementation of a “leadership practice field” in our preparation programs. The conceptual notion at work here is that of creating a bridge between the performance field (working in the system) and a practice field (working on the system). This model is based on the work of Daniel Kim, a colleague of Peter Senge (The Fifth Discipline) and cofounder of the MIT Organizational Learning Center, where he is currently director of the Learning Laboratory Research Project. Te central idea is that a leadership practice field provides an environment in which a prospective leader can experiment with alternative strategies and policies, test assumptions, and practice working through the complex issues of school administration in a constructive and productive manner.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks