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DSP Laboratory: Introduction, Hardware and Software Setup

Module by: Erik Luther. E-mail the author

Summary: The purpose of this lab is to familiarize students with the DSP development workstation in the signal processing lab by examining sampling, analysis, and reconstruction of continuous-time signals. Specifically, we will first look at sampling/reconstruction of continuous-time signals. We will then examine time- and frequency-domain displays. Finally, we will examine the importance of sampling frequency and its effects on aliasing.

DSP Workstation Hardware List & Setup

Hardware: Dell Dimension 4550 PC with a Pentium 4 microprocessor

    • Runs software to design/implement digital filters
    • Controls data acquisition and analysis
    • Communicates with the DSP board and/or soundcard
    • Edits/assembles/downloads code for the DSP chip on the DSP board

National Instruments SPEEDY-33

A self-contained, high-performance, programmable DSP board for signal processing applications. The SPEEDY-33 comes equipped with a Texas Instruments DSP for high speed DSP calculations and Analog to Digital (A/D) and Digital to Analog (D/A) converters for interaction with the outside world.

  • Specifications of the NI SPEEDY-33 are as follows:
    • Bundled with LabVIEW DSP programming environment
    • Includes a Texas Instruments VC33 floating point DSP processor
    • 13-ns Instruction Cycle Time
    • 150 Million Floating-Point Operations Per Second (MFLOPS)
    • 75 Million Instructions Per Second (MIPS)
    • USB interface used for connection to the PC
    • 16-bit stereo audio codec with two on-board microphones
    • Software-controlled adjustable sampling rate (8, 18, 24, 36, 44.1, and 48 kHz)
    • Eight memory-mapped LED’s and eight memory-mapped general purpose switch inputs
    • Serial Port, CompactFlash interface

Figure 1: National Instruments Speedy 33
Figure 1 (speedy.jpg)

Condenser Microphone.

Personal Headphone set with individual volume control.

Black 3 prong headphone booster.

Audio Cable to go from the computer sound card to the microphone.

Male to male adapter cable.

Alternative option to NI Speedy 33:

Texas Instruments 6711 DSK

  • Digital Signal Processing Board with PCM3003 Audio Daughter Card

The DSP board is responsible for the high-speed DSP calculations and the daughter card controls the A/D and D/A conversion between the DSP board and the outside world.

  • Specifications of the DSP board and daughter card are as follows:
    • TI TMS320C6711 floating point DSP processor
    • Software-controlled adjustable sampling rate (8, 9.6, 12, 16, 24, and 48 kHz)
    • 16-bit stereo audio codec with two on-board microphones. A lowpass anti-aliasing filter at the input channel with a fixed cutoff frequency = 24 kHz

Software:

The software used in the lab is National Instruments LabVIEW DSP Module; a block diagram-based graphical programming package for digital signal processing that will be used for: data acquisition, time domain data display, frequency domain calculation and display, filter implementation, convolution and correlation calculations, speech/signal modeling, and real-time filtering. Using LabVIEW DSP Module in conjunction with the LabVIEW Digital Filter Design Toolkit, the DSP board and the rest of the lab equipment will not only allow students to perform data acquisition, analysis, and filtering, it will also give them the ability to listen to the filtered output.

Test Equipment:

  1. Wavetek 270 Function Generator
  2. Tektronix 2213A Oscilloscope

System Set-up

Before beginning the lab, you need to make sure that the system is set up correctly. Follow the instructions below to setup the station.

Note:

Instructions are included for both the SPEEDY-33 and TI 6711 DSK, follow instructions appropriate to the hardware on your station.

Hardware Setup

NI SPEEDY-33 Setup Instructions

Figure 2: NI SPEEDY-33 Installation Guide Part #: 371581A-01, 324158A-01
NI SPEEDY-33 DSP Board
NI SPEEDY-33 DSP Board (Graphic2)
  • Log on to the computer
  • Connect a USB cable between the PC USB Port of the SPEEDY-33 (Figure 2 #7) and the USB port of your PC. The SPEEDY-33 is powered by the USB port. Once you connect the cable, the green Power LED (Figure 2 #2) on the SPEEDY-33 will light.
  • Confirm that the Power LED on the SPEEDY-33 is lit.
  • If the New Hardware Found Wizard starts, follow the instructions to configure the drivers.
  • Connect your headphones to the black 3-pronged headphone booster and connect this booster to the Audio Stereo Output Port (Figure 2 #4) on the SPEEDY-33. Turn on the headphone volume booster.
  • Connect the light gray cable coming out of the computer (which is the audio output from the computer sound card) to the short gray male-male adapter cable and connect this, in turn, to the Audio Stereo Input Port (Figure 2 #3) of the SPEEDY-33. The soundcard output (either CD audio or microphone) will be the input to the DSP board for most of this lab.
  • Switch the Jumpers on the SPEEDY-33 to the Line position. Refer to Figure 1 for the location of the Line/Microphone Jumpers (Figure 2 #9).

TI 6711 DSK Setup Instructions

  • Plug the A/C adapter into the DSP board and make sure that the power LED is lit.
  • Connect your headphones to the black 3-pronged headphone booster and connect this booster to the OUT jack on the audio daughter card attached to the DSP board. Do not use the OUT jack directly on the DSP board. Turn on the headphone volume booster.
  • Connect the light gray cable coming out of the computer (which is the audio output from the computer sound card) to the short gray male-male adapter cable and connect this, in turn, to the IN jack of the audio daughter card. Do not use the IN jack directly on the DSP board. The soundcard output (either CD audio or microphone) will be the input to the DSP board for most of this lab.
  • Log on to the computer.
  • Once you log on, a DSK Init window should appear on the task bar. Click on it to open up the window and then press ENTER as often as needed to complete the initialization. This configures the parallel port of the computer to communicate with the DSP board. Note: If you forgot to supply power to the DSP board prior to this step, the initialization will fail. In which case, you will have to log off, power up the DSP board, and then log on again and run the initialization routine again.
  • Select the EE 453 folder and create a folder within this folder to store your lab files. Use some descriptive name to identify your lab group. The path for this folder will be Desktop\ee 453\<folder name>
  • Activate Surround Mixer, a program which controls the input/output operation of the sound card. The Surround Mixer control panel is a mixer consisting of numerous volume bars, each controlling a different aspect of the sound card. The far left volume bar controls the master volume. Make sure that the master volume is set to 100%. The volume bars in the middle control the various types of sound sources that the sound card can play (wave files, microphone input, MIDI input, music CD input, etc). Make sure that the wav/mp3, microphone, and line-in volumes are set to 100%.
  • Beneath each of the volume bars is a mute box that can be toggled on/off. When checked, the corresponding sound source is deactivated. Make sure that all source buttons are muted for now.
  • Keep the Surround Mixer open throughout the lab. You will be selecting various inputs (wave, microphone, and line-in) throughout the lab.

Note:

When you are finished with each lab, exit LabVIEW, log off the computer, turn off the function generator and the headphone volume booster, and unplug the DSP board from the A/C adapter. Turn in Answered Questions to the TA.

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