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  • Rice University ELEC 301 Projects

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    By: Rice University ELEC 301As a part of collection: "ELEC 301 Projects Fall 2005"

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  • Rice Digital Scholarship

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  • Lens for Engineering

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    By: Sidney BurrusAs a part of collection: "ELEC 301 Projects Fall 2005"

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Abstract and History

Module by: Danny Blanco, Elliot Ng, Charlie Ice, Bryan Grandy. E-mail the authors

Abstract and History

Abstract

For years, people have devised different techniques for encrypting data while others have attempted to break these encrypted codes. For our project we decided to put our wealth of DSP knowledge to use in the art of steganography. Steganography is a technique that allows one to hide binary data within an image while adding few noticeable changes. Technological advancements over the past decade or so have brought terms like “mp3,” “jpeg,” and “mpeg” into our everyday vocabulary. These lossy compression techniques lend themselves perfectly for hiding data. We have chosen this project because it gives a chance to study several various aspects of DSP. First, we devised our own compression technique which we loosely based off jpeg. There have been many steganographic techniques created so far, which compelled us to create two of our own strategies for hiding data in the images we compress. Our first method, zero hiding, adds the binary data into the DCT coefficients dropped in compression. Our other method, which we called bit-o-steg, uses a key to change the values of coefficients that remain after compression. Finally, we had to find ways to analyze the success of our data hiding strategies, so through our research we found both DSP and statistical methods to qualitatively measure our work.

A Brief History of Steganography

Steganography, or “hidden writing” can be traced back to 440 BC in ancient Greece. Often they would write a message on a wooden panel, cover it in wax, and then write a message on the wax. These wax tablets were already used as writing utensils, so the hiding of a message in a commonly used device draws very little suspicion. In addition to use by the Greeks, the practice of steganography was utilized by spies in World War II. There were even rumors that terrorists made use of steganography early in 2001 to plan the attacks of September 11

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

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