Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax_CNX

You are here: Home » Content » ELEC 301 Projects Fall 2005 » Matched Filter Based Detection

Navigation

Table of Contents

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • Rice University ELEC 301 Projects

    This collection is included inLens: Rice University ELEC 301 Project Lens
    By: Rice University ELEC 301

    Click the "Rice University ELEC 301 Projects" link to see all content affiliated with them.

  • Rice Digital Scholarship

    This collection is included in aLens by: Digital Scholarship at Rice University

    Click the "Rice Digital Scholarship" link to see all content affiliated with them.

Also in these lenses

  • Lens for Engineering

    This collection is included inLens: Lens for Engineering
    By: Sidney Burrus

    Click the "Lens for Engineering" link to see all content selected in this lens.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.
 

Matched Filter Based Detection

Module by: Kyle Ringgenberg. E-mail the author

Summary: Summary of past project ideas using the concepts of a "Matched Filter" to determine instrument types and pitches. Discussion of limitation of this approach.

Shortcomings of the Matched Filter

Upon initial glance, one would be inclined to assume that implementing a simple matched filter would be a fairly straightforward, and relatively precise means of accomplishing this projects goal. This is, however simple incorrect. There are several key issues involved with the implementation of a matched filter that deem it an unsatisfactory algorithm in this particular instance.

Upon initial glance, one would be inclined to assume that implementing a simple matched filter would be a fairly straightforward, and relatively precise means of accomplishing this projects goal. This is, however simple incorrect. There are several key issues involved with the implementation of a matched filter that deem it an unsatisfactory algorithm in this particular instance.

Furthermore, a second, and more key issue arises with the implementation of this algorithm. For a matched filter to function correctly, we must be able to match pitches precisely. Herein lies a hidden challenge, detecting what musical pitch the player is attempting to create. This is non-trivial for two reasons. Firstly, and most obviously, not all intonation will be the same. Variants of up to 20 cents in pitch can regularly exist between different performing groups… with that number drastically increasing with extraneous factors, such as the musical maturity of the group. With that issue recognized, let’s simple assume that our players are perfectly in tune. A simple analysis of the Fourier Transform does not lead to straightforward detection of pitch, as some have assumed in the past. Simply put, the highest spike in the frequency domain is not necessarily the pitch the artist played, there are a number of instruments, such as the trumpet, where the played pitch is represented by the 3rd (or even higher) harmonics, depending on various conditions. For these reasons, it is very obvious that pitch detection is a non-trivial process, with even the best algorithms incurring some degree of error.

Hence, for these two key reasons, recording variants and pitch detection, along with several other minor issues, it becomes quite obvious that matched filtering is an unacceptable means of implementing instrument recognition.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks