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Teaching as Research and Action

Module by: Fred Mednick. E-mail the author

Figure 1: Teaching is a social enterprise
The Spirit of Service
The Spirit of Service (orangecape.jpg)

Overview

What is the ultimate purpose of education if not to improve the quality of life for our children, our communities, and our earth? It is in this spirit of service that you will be guided in Course 5 to apply the theory and practice you have gained, thus far, to address a local, national, or global need.

This course has the following two outcomes, and with their satisfactory completion comes your Certificate of Teaching Mastery:

  1. The creation of your electronic Teaching Portfolio (E-Portfolio)
  2. The design and implementation of your Service Project related to one of the topics in Course 5:
    • Early childhood education
    • Literacy and numeracy for adult learners
    • Environmental education
    • Education through the arts
    • Girls' education
    • Conflict mediation
    • Special education
    • Community Teaching and Learning Centers

As in the previous courses, you will have the support of your mentor and your learning circle. In addition, you will choose a Field Advisor (a person who lives nearby) to guide you in your Service Project.

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