Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » The Basic Elements of Music » A Musical Accent Activity

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • OrangeGrove display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Florida Orange Grove Textbooks
    By: Florida Orange Grove

    Click the "OrangeGrove" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • Bookshare

    This collection is included inLens: Bookshare's Lens
    By: Bookshare - A Benetech Initiative

    Comments:

    "Accessible versions of this collection are available at Bookshare. DAISY and BRF provided."

    Click the "Bookshare" link to see all content affiliated with them.

Also in these lenses

  • Evowl display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Rice LMS's Lens
    By: Rice LMS

    Comments:

    "testing"

    Click the "Evowl" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • TEC Music Theory Resources display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: TEC Music Theory resources
    By: Cynthia FaisstAs a part of collection: "Noisy Learning: Loud but Fun Music Education Activities"

    Click the "TEC Music Theory Resources" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • musicBasics

    This collection is included inLens: Music Basics
    By: Chinwei Hu

    Click the "musicBasics" link to see all content selected in this lens.

  • crowe display tagshide tags

    This collection is included in aLens by: Chris Rowe

    Click the "crowe" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • bkl display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Billion Kids Library
    By: Open Learning Exchange (OLE)

    Click the "bkl" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

A Musical Accent Activity

Module by: Catherine Schmidt-Jones. E-mail the author

Summary: Lesson plan for an activity that helps music students practice using accents.

See Dynamics and Accents in Music for introductory information on musical accents. The proper method for performing an accent varies greatly between different types of instruments and styles of music, and can present quite a challenge for the young instrumentalist. By temporarily separating reading from concerns on how to properly perform accents on a specific instrument, this activity simplifies the task of reading and performing "accents", allowing an intermediate success that can translate into confidence in performing accents correctly.

Goals and Evaluation

  • Goals - The goal of the activity is to introduce students to the concept of musical accents and to help beginning instrumentalists practice reading and performing accents.
  • Objectives - The student will read notated rhythms - of gradually increasing complexity - that include accented notes, and perform them accurately as a simple percussion piece, either individually or with a group.
  • Grade Level - This activity is designed for students in grades 4-8, but may be used by younger or older students who are at the appropriate level of musical awareness.
  • Student Prerequisites - The students should be able to accurately and easily read and perform the rhythms in the exercises used.
  • Teacher Expertise - The teacher should be able to read music well and must be able to act as the group "conductor" during this activity.
  • Time Requirements - Unless you have many rhythm/accent examples prepared, this activity takes less than twenty minutes. Once the concepts are introduced, it can also be used as a very short (less than five minute) warm-up to other music activities or as a quick break from desk work.
  • Music Standards Addressed - National Standards for Music Education standard 5 (reading and notating music).
  • Adaptations - To introduce the concept of accents to very young or non-reading students, simply alter the lesson plan to have the students echo short, simple rhythms with accents that are performed for them. This "listening and performing" activity may also be included along with the activity as described.
  • Extensions - Following the activity, musically experienced students may be asked to write out short exercises similar to the ones they have already done. Share them by copying them or having the students write them so that the entire class can see them (on a board, for example). Let the class try the student-written exercises. Or let them trade papers with each other and perform each other's challenges as solos.
  • Evaluation - Assess students on ability to read and perform rhythms and accents accurately and consistently, either with the group or individually in a "test" performance. If students can perform at the desired level of complexity, they are ready to practice performing accents in the proper manner on real instruments. If they cannot, have them continue to do this activity regularly over a period of weeks or months, starting with easier rhythms and gradually introducing more complexity, alternating with lessons on playing accents correctly.

Materials and Preparation

  1. Prepare your board or a handout by reproducing the rhythms and accents below and/or making up your own, based on your students' age and musical training. You can copy this PDF file, or use the figure below to make a handout. If you want an activity that will last longer, make up more lines at the correct difficulty level for your students.
  2. Level I is for students who are younger and have little or no musical training. Level II is for students who have learned to read music. Level III is even more challenging.
  3. Decide how the rhythms will be performed. Students can play on drums or other percussion instruments, if available, or play on a single pitch on any instrument. You may also use body percussion or other simple percussion techniques (see Percussion Fast and Cheap); for example clapping on regular notes and stomping, slapping thighs, or just clapping louder on accented notes; or slapping the table (or a thigh) with one hand for regular notes and both hands for accented notes.
  4. Gather or make any instruments or equipment the students will need.

Procedure

  1. Explain that accented notes are louder than the notes around them. Show them an accent on the board or handout. Notes with an accent mark should be louder. Explain how you want regular and accented notes to be performed in this activity. (See number 3 of "Preparation".)
  2. Before starting each rhythm, you must establish a steady beat, in order to get everyone to start at the same time and the same tempo. Clap four times before the students begin, or count steadily and crisply, "One, two, three, go", or use any method of "counting off" that your students are already accustomed to.
  3. Start with a slow beat. Do one rhythm at a time, all together as a group. For more of a challenge for older students, speed up the tempo, or ask them to perform rhythms alone, either after they have heard them, or sight-reading.
Figure 1
Accent Activity Suggested Rhythms
Accent Activity Suggested Rhythms (accentactiv.png)

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks