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Collection description

Module by: Joseph Grimes. E-mail the author

Summary: Titles are not informative enough for the Wordcorr community. Each collection needs a concise description, key words by which it can be located, and remarks on anything else that might be helpful.

Figure 1: Key words, description, and remarks from the Collection page of JG-SulSel12.
Figure 1 (Coll-Descr.jpg)

Names and titles are often not informative enough that a person who might profit from the contents of a collection can get a clear idea what is (and is not) in it. So Wordcorr requires a paragraph or more to describe the contents. It doesn’t have to be long, just long enough to be useful.

If you were doing a Google search for your collection, using just a regular Web browser like Firefox and not a special search engine developed for linguistics, what words would you use in the search? Put those in the Keywords field. Think about what other key words might lead people to your collection too. Separate the key words (or phrases) with comma space.

There is also an optional Remarks field for essential information that doesn’t fit standard library categories. For example, early versions of WordSurv, and many collections imported from spreadsheets, were made at a time when linguists had no access to character sets for the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in Unicode. So linguists each made up their own private conventions, things like capital “N” for angma, capital “E” for epsilon, “q” or “7” for glottal stop. There was no way they could standardize among themselves. So any collection with that kind of history needs an explanation of the original symbols in its Remarks field. From experience, we recommend that you put it in even if you think you’ve gone through and converted everything to IPA – it’s not impossible that you might have missed a few.

Anything else that linguists who use your data fifty years from now should know about your collection also goes into Remarks.

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'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks