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    By: Sidney Burrus

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References for Introduction

Module by: C. Sidney Burrus. E-mail the author

Summary: List of books and articles on engineering and engineers.

  1. Barry M. Katz, Technology and Culture: A Historical Romance, Stanford Press Alumni Series, 1990.
  2. Lawrence P. Grayson, The Making of an Engineer, An Illustrated History of Engineering Education in the United States and Canada, Wiley, 1993
  3. George Bugliarello, “Engineering”, Editorial in American Scientist, published by Sigma Xi, vol. 81, no. 3, May-June, 1993, page 206.
  4. Norman Hackerman and Kenneth Ashworth, Conversations on the Uses of Science and Technology, University of North Texas Press, 1996.
  5. Robert Pool, Beyond Engineering: How Society Shapes Technology, Oxford University Press, 1997.
  6. John Horgan, The End of Science, Facing the Limits of Knowledge in the Twilight of the Scientific Age, Addison-Wesley, 1996; and Broadway Books, 1997.
  7. Derry and Trevor I. Williams, A Short History of Technology: From the Earliest Times to A.D. 1900, Oxford University Press, 1961; and Dover, 1993.
  8. Ruth Schwartz Cowan, A Social History of American Technology, Oxford, 1997.
  9. Richard Rhodes, Visions of Technology, From Marconi, Wright and Ford to the Thinkers of Today and Tomorrow, Simon & Schuster, 1999.
  10. N. Rosenberg, R. Landau, and D. C. Mowery, Technology and the Wealth of Nations, Stanford, 1992.
  11. R. S. Lowen, Creating the Cold War University: The Transformation of Stanford, Univ. of Calif. Press, 1997.
  12. Vannevar Bush, Science, The Endless Frontier: A Report to the President on a Program for Postwar Scientific Research, US Government Printing Office, 1945.
  13. Michael Dertouzos, What Will Be, How the New World of Information will Change our Lives, Harper Collins, 1997.
  14. Kirby, S. Withington, A. B. Darling, and F. G. Kilgour, Engineering in History, McGraw-Hill, 1956; and Dover, 1990.
  15. Samuel C. Florman, The Existential Pleasures of Engineering, St. Martin’s Press, 1976.
  16. Donald Christiansen, editor, Engineering Excellence – Cultural and Organizational Factors, IEEE Press, 1987.
  17. James L. Adams, Flying Buttresses, Entropy and O-Rings: The World of an Engineer, Harvard Press, 1991.
  18. Carl Mitcham, Thinking through Technology: The Path Between Engineering and Philosophy, University of Chicago, 1994.
  19. Don Ihde, Philosophy of Technology, An Introduction, Paragon House, 1993.
  20. Bruno Latour, Aramis or The Love of Technology, The story of a 24 year design of a guided transportation system in France that was dropped in 1987, Harvard, 1997.
  21. Fred Hapgood, Up the Infinite Corridor: MIT and the Technical Imagination, Addison-Wesley, 1993.
  22. Subrata Dasgupta, Technology and Creativity, Oxford University Press, 1996.
  23. Peter F. Drucker, Post-Capitalist Society, Harper Business, 1993.
  24. Alvin Toeffler, The Third Wave, Bantam Books, 1980.
  25. Alvin and Heidi Toeffler, Powershift, Bantam, 1990.
  26. Alvin and Heidi Toeffler, Creating a New Civilization, Turner, 1995.
  27. Don Ihde, Technology and the Lifeworld, From Garden to Earth, Indiana Press, 1990;
  28. Kenneth J. Gergen, The Saturated Self, Dilemmas of Identity in Contemporary Life, Basic Books, 1991.
  29. Neil Postman, Technopoly, The Surrender of Culture to Technology, Vantage, 1993.
  30. Hardison, Jr., Disappearing Through the Skylight, Culture and Technology in the Twentieth Century, Penguin Book, 1989.
  31. Frederick Seitz, The Science Matrix, Springer-Verlag, 1992.
  32. John Hatton and Paul B. Plouffe, Science and Its Ways of Knowing, Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge, Prentice Hall, 1997.
  33. Henry Petroski, Beyond Engineering, Essays and Other Attempts to Figure without Equations, St. Martin’s Press, 1986.
  34. Kingery, R. D. Berg, and E. H. Schillinger, Men and Ideas in Engineering, Twelve Histories from Illinois, University of Illinois Press, 1967.
  35. Robert C. Goodpasture, Engineers and Ivory Towers: Hardy Cross, McGraw-Hill, 1952
  36. Raymond B. Landis, Studying Engineering, A Road map to a Rewarding Career, Discovery Press, 1995.
  37. James L. Adams, The Care & Feeding of Ideas, A Guide to Encouraging Creativity, Addison-Wesley, 1986.
  38. J. Campbell Martin, The Successful Engineer: Personal and Professional Skills - a Sourcebook, McGraw-Hill, 1993.
  39. Michal McMahon, The Making of a Profession: A Century of Electrical Engineering in America, IEEE Press, 1984.
  40. Joel, Jr. And G. E. Schindler, Jr., A History of Engineering & Science in the Bell System, Switching Technology (1925-1975), Bell Laboratories, 1982.
  41. James M. Nyce and Paul Kahn, editors, From Memex to Hypertex: Vannevar Bush and the Mind’s Machine, Academic Press, 1991.
  42. Albert Borgmann, Technology and the Character of Contemporary Life, A Philosophical Inquiry, University of Chicago Press, 1984.
  43. Samuel C. Florman, “The Education of an Engineer,” The American Scholar, winter, 1985/86, pages 97-107.
  44. David F. Noble, America by Design: Science, Technology and the Rise of Corporate Capitalism, Oxford University Press, 1979.
  45. R. Hamming, “The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics”, The American Mathematical Monthly, vol. 87, Feb. 1980.
  46. Thomas P. Hughes, The American Genesis: A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm 1870-1970, Viking Press, 1989.
  47. Carl W. Hall, “The Age of Synthesis”, The Bent of Tau Beta Pi, Summer 1997, pp. 17-19. Also, The Age of Synthesis: A Treatise and Sourcebook (Worcester Polytechnic Institute Studies in Science, Technology and Culture, Vol. 16), Peter Lang Publishing, 1995.
  48. Derek J. de Solla Price, Little Science, Big Science … and Beyond, The use of science to study the doing of science, Columbia University Press, 1963, 1986.
  49. C. P. Snow, The Two Cultures and a Second Look, Cambridge Press, 1959, 1993.
  50. Dian Olson Belanger, Enabling American Innovation, Engineering and the NSF, Purdue University Press, 1998.
  51. Hazeltine, Appropriate Technology: Tools, Choices, and Implications, Academic Press, 1998.
  52. National Academy of Engineering, Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading Edge Engineering from the 1998 NAE Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering, National Academy Press, Washington, 1999.
  53. Albert H. Teich, Technology and the Future, Seventh Edition, AAAS, St. Martin’s Press, 1997.
  54. Peter J. Denning, editor, The Invisible Future: The Seamless Integration of Technology into Everyday Life, McGraw-Hill, 2001. A collection of essays from the ACM conference, Beyond Cyberspace, A Journey of Many Directions.
  55. David Brown, Inventing Modern America: From the Microwave to the Mouse, MIT Press,2002
  56. Clayton M. Christensen, The Innovator’s Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail, Harvard Business School, 1997.
  57. David P. Billington, The Innovators: The Engineering Pioneers Who Made America Modern, Wiley, 1996.
  58. Greg Pearson and A. Thomas Young, editors, Technically Speaking: Why all Americans Need to Know More About Technology, National Academy Press, 2002.
  59. Alan Lightman, Daniel Sarewitz, and Christina Desser, editors, Living with the Genie: Essays on Technology and the Quest for Human Mastery, Island Press, 2003.
  60. Steven Brint, editor, The Future of the City of Intellect: The Changing American University, Stanford University Press, 2002.
  61. Billy Vaughn Koen, Discussion of THE Method, Conducting the Engineering Approach to Problem Solving, Oxford Press, 2003.
  62. Charles M. Vest, Pursuing the Endless Frontier, Essays on MIT and the Role of the Research Universities, MIT Press, 2005.
  63. Arun Kumar Tripathi, “Technologically Mediated Lifeworld, Ubiquity, vol. 5, Issue 41, Dec. 2005. An ACM Web Publication.
  64. Harold Evans, They Made America, From the Steam Engine to the Search Engine: Two Centuries of Innovators; Little, Brown, and Company, 2004.
  65. John Steele Gordon, A Thread Across the Ocean, The Heroic Story of the Transatlantic Cable, Perennial 2002.
  66. Thomas P. Hughes, Human-Built World: How to Think about Technology and Culture, Chicago Press, 2004.

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