Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax_CNX

You are here: Home » Content » The State of Scholarly Publishing in the History of Art and Architecture » Appendix C: Focused Discussions with Art History Scholars

Navigation

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.
 

Appendix C: Focused Discussions with Art History Scholars

Module by: Lawrence McGill. E-mail the author

Three focused discussions were held with art history scholars concerning theirpublishing experiences and those of their colleagues and advisees. The first group was comprised of younger scholars (who had received their Ph.D.s within the past 10 years), the second with mid-career and senior scholars, and the third with chairs of graduate art history departments in the northeastern United States. The first two of these discussions were formally-designed focus groups devoted to exploring the topic of the present study at some length. The chairs’ discussion was a shorter, less-structured session that was part of a larger meeting with additional agenda items. All three discussions were held in New York City.

In the two formally-designed focus groups, efforts were made to maximize the diversity of perspectives represented within each group, across the following dimensions: race, age, sex, year Ph.D. received, field of specialization, tenure status, number of books published, and institutional affiliation. For budgetary reasons, participants were recruited from academic institutions in the northeastern United States, so that the costs associated with airline flights and overnight hotel stays could be avoided. Since it was not possible to conduct additional focus groups with participants from other parts of the country, we cannot say for sure whether the perspectives expressed in these focus groups are representative of the sorts of concerns art historians elsewhere in the United States might have. Scholars from the following institutions participated in the focus groups: Brown University, City University of New York, Columbia University, Harvard University, New York University, Rutgers University, Sarah Lawrence College, State University of New York (Stony Brook), University of Delaware, and University of Pennsylvania.

Brief questionnaires were sent in advance to the participants in the two formally-designed focus groups. CV’s were also obtained from each of the participants in advance of the sessions. A semi-structured discussion guide was developed for each group. (Copies of the questionnaires and the discussion guides are included in this appendix.) Lawrence T. McGill, deputy director of the Princeton University Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies, moderated the two formal focus groups, with input from the co-principal investigators. (Mariët Westermann, professor at the Institute of Fine Arts at NYU, moderated the chairs’ discussion.) The formal focus groups were audiotaped, to aid in the analysis of the findings.

The focus group with younger scholars in art and architectural history was convened by Columbia University Professor Hilary Ballon and held at Columbia University on October 28, 2005. The session ran from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. with a half-hour break. Twelve scholars participated in the discussion.

The focus group with mid-career and senior scholars was convened by Professor Mariët Westermann and held at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University on November 18, 2005. The session ran from 12:00 noon to 3:30 p.m. with a 15-minute break. Twelve scholars participated in the discussion.

The chairs’ discussion took place on December 2, 2005, also at the Institute of Fine Arts at NYU. The session ran from about noon to 1:00 p.m. Chairs from about a dozen art history graduate programs in the northeastern U.S. participated in the discussion.

The remainder of this appendix presents the letters of invitation, the advance questionnaires, and the discussion guides for the October 28 and November 18 focus groups.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks