Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax_CNX

You are here: Home » Content » The Impact of Open Source Software on Education » Summary

Navigation

Table of Contents

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

In these lenses

  • FOSS display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Open Source
    By: Ross Gardler

    Comments:

    "General content on open source"

    Click the "FOSS" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Summary

Module by: Ken Udas. E-mail the author

Summary: Summary of Ruth Sabean's contribution to the "OSS and OER in Education Series." In this 2 part interview, Ruth Sabean, assistant vice provost for educational technology in UCLA’s College of Letters and Science, discusses the evaluation process she managed at UCLA that resulted in the selection of the open source application Moodle.

Ruth Saban Interview Summary

The first installment in the Impact of Open Source Software Series was an interview with Ruth Sabean, assistant vice provost for educational technology in UCLA’s College of Letters and Science and director of educational technology in the university’s Office of Information Technology. We discussed UCLA’s adoption of Moodle. Some of the major points and themes of the interview included:

  • The prime mover for UCLA’s decision to evaluate and select a new learning management environment was to help provide a common infrastructure to promote sharing and innovation across units at UCLA. The selected technology was offered on an opt-in basis for academic units.
  • The process started with a commitment to adopting an Open Source technology and the field of applications was quickly reduced to Moodle and Sakai
  • UCLA committed to Open Source because they wanted to benefit through contributing to and learning from a global partnership that holds values of access and cooperation matching those of UCLA.
  • UCLA had little interest in being tied to large commercial vendors who are guided by larger market forces that have little to do with UCLA teaching, learning, and collaboration needs.
  • UCLA fully anticipates contributing actively to the Moodle community and to the larger dialog around interoperability.
  • Ruth saw some of the challenges to contributing to Moodle as UCLA’s independent streak and lack of experience contributing to an Open Source community, but felt that Moodle was an inviting community.
  • Ruth indicated that when making a good decision about Open Source or commercial software, you need to understand your requirements, understand how the software will meet them, and evaluate your options based on those criteria.
  • Although Sakai and Moodle had both advantages and disadvantages, it was product maturity, community strength, and progress during the past 5 years, that swayed the evaluation committee to select Moodle.
  • Ruth suggested that some of the most important factors in a successful evaluation and selection process is to really understand your organization, have faculty drive the process, and actively seek feedback from colleagues at other institutions.

There were a number of comments and responses made during the days following Ruth’s post. There were at least two central themes that were generated from the comments.

  1. There was a fair amount of discussion about some of the perceived trade-offs between Sakai and Moodle and a larger set of issues about the potential for a service-oriented architecture sitting at the center of a learning management environment. The UCLA and SUNY experience suggested that at least conceptually Sakai offered a fair amount of promise for tool interoperability, but that it failed to deliver in some critical ways and lacked much of the community involvement that is one of the remarkable achievements of Moodle. Some discussion about Moodle’s architectural flexibility was offered during the dialog. The discussion rests within the context of universities seeking a learning environment that best meets the needs of teachers and learners within unique contexts.
  2. There was a second theme that focused on cultural acceptance of Open Source software within UCLA and UCLA’s interest in and ability to contribute to the Moodle community

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks