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Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

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  • Cariblit display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Caribbean Literacy and Related Matters
    By: Barbara JosephAs a part of collection: "An Open Source Vision for Caribbean Higher Education"

    Comments:

    "...useful for initiates in the field of the use of Open Educational resources."

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  • FOSS display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Open Source
    By: Ross Gardler

    Comments:

    "General content on open source"

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Summary

Module by: Ken Udas. E-mail the author

Summary: Summary of Craig Perue's contribution to the "OSS and OER in Education Series." In this post, he shares his experiences while leading eLearning@UWI’s investments in open-source software to make eLearning a self-sustaining, across all of the campuses of the 15-country University of the West Indies.

Summary - Not IT, not Business Processes, but Organizational Culture

“Not IT, not Business Processes, but Organizational Culture,” the eighth installment of the Impact of Open Source Software Series, was scheduled on June 13th and posted on June 14th, 2007, by Craig Perue, who serves as the Programme Manager for eLearning@UWI. Thanks Craig!

Craig’s posting took the form of a story describing some of the challenges faced at the University of the West Indies while establishing and managing their online learning environment. He described the rationale for moving from a proprietary learning management system to Moodle, other migrations to open source software, and future plans to continue migrating from proprietary applications to Open Source Software (OSS) throughout the software stack. During the posting, Craig touched on the evaluation process, the areas where he thinks his institution delivers value and the role of OSS in creating value for learners, and some of the connections between organizational culture and the use of Free and Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS).

Comments

The comments that followed the posting were about “open source” teaching and open educational resources. Craig reflected on some of the definitions of learning design that were discussed in an earlier posting with James Dalziel, and talked about the conditions at his university that will either support or limit open and free content. He asked for suggestions about business models that will support universities that participate in open source teaching, to which Richard Wyles pointed him to some work that he has been doing with Moodle Networks. Finally, a question was floated about the faculty reaction to opening content at the largest college at UWI.

Thanks again to Craig, Richard Wyles, and all of the other folks who have been reading along. Our next posting will be by Jean-Claude Dauphin, Project Manager, Section for ICTs in Education, Science and Culture,Information Society Division, Communication and Information Sector, UNESCO, on June 27, 2007. The schedule for the series can be found on WikiEducator.

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'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks