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My OER Portfolio

Module by: ISKME. E-mail the author

Summary: This module covers how OER Common's portfolio can assist you in getting quick access to your most important OER materials. Maximize the power of OER Commons by using the portfolio to personalize your experience.

The module “Tagging, Rating, and Reviewing OER Materials” showed how you can begin contributing to OER Commons by using tags as well as rating and reviewing materials. This module, “My OER Portfolio,” explains how the OER Portfolio can maximize your experience in using OER Commons.

What is My OER Portfolio?

When you register for a free account at OER Commons, a portfolio and profile is automatically created. Every time you save a search, add tags, ratings, reviews, comments, or submit your own instructional materials to OER Commons, these items are stored in your portfolio. You can quickly access all these items by clicking on the My OER Portfolio link located on the top of any OER Commons page.

Having a portfolio and profile in OER Commons can stimulate collaboration among educators and learners within and across disciplines.

The advantages to using your portfolio is that it:

  • personalizes your OER Commons experience
  • provides quick access to your most important OER materials
  • manages all your OER Commons items in one place
  • provides a history of your OER Commons activity
  • makes it possible to share your OER items with others

Activity: Adding an OER saved search to your portfolio

  1. Go to OER Commons. You must be logged in to do this activity.
  2. Locate any OER item by searching with a keyword or clicking on a tag.
  3. On the results page, click the “Save This Search” button.
  4. This search is now saved in your portfolio.
  5. Go to your portfolio to view your saved search.

Activity: Saving an OER item in your portfolio

  1. Go to OER Commons. You must be logged in to do this activity.
  2. Locate any OER item by searching with a keyword or clicking on a tag.
  3. The results page appears with a listing of materials. Click on a title.
  4. Under the title click the link “Save Item.”
  5. The item is now saved in your portfolio.
  6. Go to your portfolio to view the saved item.

Activity: Saving tags, ratings, and reviews to your portfolio

Go to the module Tagging, Rating, and Reviewing OER Materials to learn how to create tags, ratings, and reviews, which are automatically saved to your portfolio as they are created.

Activity: Saving notes to your portfolio

  1. Go to OER Commons. You must be logged in to do this activity.
  2. Locate any OER item by searching with a keyword or clicking on a tag.
  3. The results page appears with a listing of materials. Click on a title.
  4. Under the title click the link “My Notes.”
  5. Create a note in the notes field, then click the “Save” button.
  6. The note is now saved in your portfolio.
  7. Go to your portfolio to view the saved note.

Searching your portfolio

You can search for items that exist only in your portfolio. You must be inside your portfolio to access this search feature.

Navigating within your portfolio

You can quickly jump to different items in your portfolio by using the navigation located in your portfolio on the left side of your screen. See Figure 1 for a visual representation of the portfolio navigation.

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.jpg)

Figure 1. Visual representation of the portfolio navigation.

If you have several items in your portfolio, there may be more than one page in your portfolio. To navigate to other pages, either click on a number or the back or forward arrows. These are located in the navigation bar on top and below all the items in your portfolio. See Figure 2 for a visual representation of this navigation bar.

Brackets surrounding a number indicate the page you are on. Figure 2 shows, e.g., that you are on page 2 of your portfolio with a total number of 36 pages. Notice the small arrows on the left and right ends of the bar. Clicking on the right arrow will take you to the next page while the left arrow will take you to the preceding page.

This navigation bar is present through all of OER Commons, not just in your portfolio.

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.jpg)

Figure 2. Visual representation of the navigation bar for browsing through pages in your portfolio.

Shared Portfolios

When your portfolio is created, by default it is a shared portfolio. Viewing shared portfolios shows what others have in their portfolio. Shared portfolios assist in knowledge sharing; you can see how others are actively engaging with OER. The concept of sharing portfolios is the foundation of the open educational resource movement: it is one of many avenues for providing access to teaching and learning materials by exchanging content for others to use and re-use.

Activity: Access OER Commons Shared Portfolios

  1. Click on OER Matters located on the top of any OER Commons page.
  2. On the left side of the screen, click on the Shared Portfolios link.

For easier access to the hundreds of portfolios, rearrange the number of results per page. If you choose “100 per page” on the drop down menu, you will have fewer pages to navigate through. Be sure to click the “Rearrange” button after you change the number of items to view per page.

Your OER profile

After creating a free account in OER Commons, you can edit your profile. There are 2 different ways to access your profile:

  1. Log in to your account at OER Commons.
  2. A page confirming you have logged in appears.
  3. Click on the link “Member Profile” to edit your profile.
  4. Edit/update your information as needed.
  5. Click the ”Save” button.

On the Edit OER Member page, you can set your profile or portfolio to a private setting. Our recommendation is to keep both settings public. OER Commons’ mission is to expand educational opportunities by increasing access to high-quality Open Educational Resources (OER), and facilitating the creation, use, and re-use of OER, for instructors, students, and self-learners. By keeping your portfolio public, you become a link in the chain of the OER movement.

The second way to access your profile page is to click on the “My Profile” link near the upper right corner of any OER Commons page. See Figure 3 for a visual representation.

Figure 3
Figure 3 (graphics3.jpg)

Figure 3. Visual representation of where to find the “My Profile” link.

Activity: Share Your Experience

In the OER Commons discussion “How and Why of OER,” post your stories, suggestions, and questions with using OER in your teaching and learning. Here are a few questions to consider in your post:

  1. Share 2 or 3 ways you have used your OER Portfolio in teaching or learning.
  2. What kind of functionality would like to have in your portfolio?
  3. How has Shared Portfolios impacted your OER experience?

For More Information

The following resources have been selected to provide more information on concepts we covered in this module.

My OER Portfolio: http://www.oercommons.org/help/learn-more-about/my-oer-portfolio

Shared Portfolios: http://www.oercommons.org/matters/share

Other modules in this course include …

This module showed how the OER Portfolio can maximize your experience in OER Commons by personalizing your use and getting quick access to your most important OER materials. The next module, “Submitting Materials to OER Commons,” will show how to submit your own content items or links to items about the field of open education to OER Commons.

OER Commons Links

For more information about OER Commons, send an email to info@oercommons.org.

Use this feedback form to send OER Commons general feedback, a feature request, or information about a bug/problem you had using the site.

To see the ever-growing list of the new content providers and contributors to OER Commons, visit the Content Providers page often. You can be one too!

“Quotable Quote”

We store information with other people.1

About This Module

The "How Tos" of OER Commons is a set of learning modules evolving out of the development of OER Commons (http://www.oercommons.org), a teaching and learning network for free-to-use educational materials from around the world, created and licensed by the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education (ISKME).

Course contributors are Lisa Petrides, Amee Godwin, and Cynthia Jimes, and online learning consultant, Patricia Delich.

For more information, visit http://www.iskme.org and http://elearningnetworks.com.

Footnotes

  1. Gladwell, M. (2002). The Tipping Point. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

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My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks