Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » ELEC 301 Projects Fall 2007 » Blind Source Separation Via ICA: Introduction and Background

Navigation

Table of Contents

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • Rice University ELEC 301 Projects display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Rice University ELEC 301 Project Lens
    By: Rice University ELEC 301

    Click the "Rice University ELEC 301 Projects" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Also in these lenses

  • Lens for Engineering

    This collection is included inLens: Lens for Engineering
    By: Sidney Burrus

    Click the "Lens for Engineering" link to see all content selected in this lens.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Blind Source Separation Via ICA: Introduction and Background

Module by: Angela Qian, John Steinbauer, Akshay Dayal, Mark Eastaway. E-mail the authors

Summary: This module is an introduction to our study and implementation of a blind source separation system using ICA.

Blind Source Separation via ICA

Introduction and Background

Imagine you are driving in a car with the radio on and your friends talking in the backseat. You wish to make a phone call on your Blue-Tooth cell phone; however, the person on the other side of the line cannot distinguish what you are saying due to the background noise. A digital signal processing system can be developed to extract your voice signal from the rest of the noise and send it over to the cell phone tower. One such system capable of doing this is blind source separation.

In this project, we present an introduction to the implementation and study of blind source separation through independent component analysis (ICA). The aspiration of our project is to recover independent source signals given only sensor recordings composed of unknown linear combinations of the independent sources. Through ICA, we can successfully separate the two signals apart or extract a signal (i.e. a voice) from background noise (i.e. music).

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

Figure 1: This is a pictorial representation of the process described above.

ICA separates the signals using second-order statistics and reduces the higher order statistical dependencies in order to make the recovered separated signals as independent as possible.

Applying blind source separation via this method will enable many applications in signal processing such as audio or image separation, telecommunications, and medical signal processing.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks