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Melodic Considerations

Module by: Gordon Lamb. E-mail the author

Summary: This module represents considerations of melody in the study of a choral score and its implications for rehearsal and performance.

MELODIC CONSIDERATIONS

Determine the type of melody—major, minor, modal, or synthetic. After this has been determined, examine the melody closely. Use the following questions as a guide to that examination.

1. Does the melody consist of long or short phrases?

2. Is the melody arch like?

3. Can any sequences be found?

4. What are the intervals of the melody? Are there any intervals that will cause problems for the ensemble?

5. Is the melody conjunct or disjunct?

6. Do the intervals outline triads or special interval groupings? What are the harmonic implications of the melody?

7. What is the range of the melody?

8. Is the melody the most important aspect of the composition?

9. Where is the most important part of every phrase? Of the entire melody?

10. What are the characteristics of the melody that can be used to help teach the work to the ensemble? Does it have any unique characteristics that can be used as teaching aids in the rehearsal?

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