Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax_CNX

You are here: Home » Content » A Comprehensive Outline of World History » A.D. 501 to 600

Navigation

Table of Contents

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • OrangeGrove display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Florida Orange Grove Textbooks
    By: Florida Orange Grove

    Click the "OrangeGrove" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • JVLA Affiliated

    This collection is included inLens: Jesuit Virtual Learning Academy Affiliated Material
    By: Jesuit Virtual Learning Academy

    Click the "JVLA Affiliated" link to see all content affiliated with them.

  • Bookshare

    This collection is included inLens: Bookshare's Lens
    By: Bookshare - A Benetech Initiative

    Comments:

    "Accessible versions of this collection are available at Bookshare. DAISY and BRF provided."

    Click the "Bookshare" link to see all content affiliated with them.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

A.D. 501 to 600

Module by: Jack E. Maxfield. E-mail the author

A.D. 501 TO 600

Backward to A.D. 401 to 500

In general this was a century of continued wars, jockeying of the various "barbarian tribes” for posts and attempted consolidation of their various positions. The chief consequences of the migrations of the 3rd to this 6th century have been listed by McNeill (Ref. 139) as follows:

  1. The barbarians assimilated civilized styles of life
  2. The civilized communities of Eurasia (excepting China) were impelled to modify their military, political and social systems by introducing features we call by the term "medieval". These included cataphracts (heavily armored cavalry) supported by various subsidies and the development of a peculiar military class, of ten mercenaries, which soon lessened the central authority over those "knights in armor". The Byzantines controlled this less effectively than the Persians
  3. The rise of religion to a central place in personal and public affairs gave a radically new character to the high cultural traditions of both Rome and Persia and affected Chinese civilization in a similar, although less drastic fashion
  4. The factors which finally resulted in the overthrow of the new barbarian empires are discussed in a separate section at the end of this chapter. Leprosy first appeared at this time in Egypt, France and Britain although it is probable that many, more ancient disfiguring skin diseases had been described under this heading, in error (Ref. 140)

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH

In this century two great names, of ten called the Fathers of the Western Christian Society, appeared. One was St. Benedict who established a monastery in 529 which was to guide most later monasteries in the west. The other, living in the latter half of the century, was Pope Gregory I 1, a superstitious, credulous man with a terrifying piety who nevertheless gave law to monasticism and spread the Christian gospel through Europe. He developed parish organization, arranged orderly festivals and processions and standardized sacerdotal clothes. If one considers the European "Dark Ages" to have existed at this time - a period when learning and science and art and literature seemed to be at a standstill - one must credit the monasteries as being a great repository for the storage of some of that previously hard-earned knowledge. Cassiodorus was a monk contemporary with Benedict and Gregory who tried to preserve education and some science. His influence in making monasticism into a powerful instrument for restoration of social order was perhaps even greater than those contemporaries. (Ref. 49, 213)

In the early development of Christianity rational medical practice practically disappeared as the old Judaic concept of disease as being equated with a kind of sin was promoted. The corollary was that the only possible cure was through Grace, the unpredictable intervention of God. This interpretation of cause and cure of disease was expounded in detail by Pope Gregory. (Ref. 125)

INTERNATIONAL JEWRY

From this century on the Jews became particularly identified with international and regional trade. The reasons for this included the widespread dispersion of these people in both Islam and Christian Europe, with group solidarity, linguistic communication and a uniform commercial law, based on the Talmud. (Ref. 8)

Forward to A.D. 601 to 700

Footnotes

  1. This is the "4th father of the Church" mentioned by Thomas (Ref. 213) as mentioned on page 354

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks