Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » A Comprehensive Outline of World History (Organized by Region) » Africa: A.D. 101 to 200

Navigation

Table of Contents

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • OrangeGrove display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Florida Orange Grove Textbooks
    By: Florida Orange GroveAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History"

    Click the "OrangeGrove" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • JVLA Affiliated

    This module is included inLens: Jesuit Virtual Learning Academy Affiliated Material
    By: Jesuit Virtual Learning AcademyAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History"

    Click the "JVLA Affiliated" link to see all content affiliated with them.

  • Bookshare

    This module is included inLens: Bookshare's Lens
    By: Bookshare - A Benetech InitiativeAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History"

    Comments:

    "Accessible versions of this collection are available at Bookshare. DAISY and BRF provided."

    Click the "Bookshare" link to see all content affiliated with them.

Also in these lenses

  • future perfect curriculum display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Mark Dominic Kalil's Lens for general enquiry but focussed on a transformational curriculum
    By: Mark Dominic Kalil

    Click the "future perfect curriculum" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Africa: A.D. 101 to 200

Module by: Jack E. Maxfield. E-mail the author

AFRICA

Back to Africa: 0 to A.D. 100

NORTHEAST AFRICA

The kingdoms of Meroe and Axum continued to develop. (See page 292) Egypt was under the rule of the Roman emperor, but beyond the mouth of the Nile, the country was actually little touched by Romanization. The royal custom of brother-sister marriage had been copied by the lower classes, and it has been estimated that by this century two-thirds of the citizens of Arsinoe were off spring of sibling unions. Alexandria was now a great trade center containing some 500,000 people, receiving goods from Red Sea ports and exporting its own manufactured products such as linen, processed Arabian drugs, Indian perfumes, papyrus, glass-ware and Egyptian grain. This city which originally was one of the greatest of the Greek cities, gradually became more and more oriental. Strife between Greeks and Jews resulted in massacres; soldiers mutinied and taxes soared.

Ptolemy, or Claudius Ptolemaeus1, was a great scientist concerned with the Alexandrian library in this century. Inspired by Hipparchus, who appeared to have provided one of the links between Babylonian and Greek science, Ptolemy wrote a mathematical treatise which became known as the Almagest. The 360 degree circle of the Babylonians was used, trigonometry was promoted and astronomy advanced, although with some errors. With 1,002 stars catalogued the heaven was considered spherical and as rotating around the immobile earth sphere. This concept made Ptolemy's theories very acceptable to the theologians of the later Middle Ages. He did have a system showing relationships of stars and planets which was effective from the practical standpoint. He also wrote a Geographical Treatise which included the geography of Marinus of Tyre. (Ref. 48)

NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHWEST AFRICA

North Africa remained the granary of Rome, with the Moors as the dominant people of the area now developing considerable sea-power and prestige. The Moors were of Berber origin (later with an Arab mixture) and came originally from south of Morocco in the country of present Mauretania, on the great Atlantic bulge of Africa. In about A.D. 125 a locust invasion destroyed large areas of cropland and this was followed by a plague which killed perhaps 500,000 in Numidia and possibly 150,000 more on the coast. (Ref. 222)

SUBSAHARAN AFRICA

The changes in central, eastern and southern Africa were very slow. As noted in the last chapter, the introduction of wet zone crops like the yam and banana allowed better penetration of the Bantu-speaking blacks into the forest and low-lying river valleys and coastal plains. They also continued to drift south along the Indian Ocean coast. (Ref. 68)

Forward to Africa: A.D. 201 to 300

Footnotes

  1. Not to be confused with the pharoahs of the B.C. centuries

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks