Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax_CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Central Eurasian Tag » Central and Northern Asia: A.D. 1301 to 1400

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • OrangeGrove display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Florida Orange Grove Textbooks
    By: Florida Orange GroveAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History"

    Click the "OrangeGrove" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • JVLA Affiliated

    This module is included inLens: Jesuit Virtual Learning Academy Affiliated Material
    By: Jesuit Virtual Learning AcademyAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History"

    Click the "JVLA Affiliated" link to see all content affiliated with them.

  • Bookshare

    This module is included inLens: Bookshare's Lens
    By: Bookshare - A Benetech InitiativeAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History"

    Comments:

    "Accessible versions of this collection are available at Bookshare. DAISY and BRF provided."

    Click the "Bookshare" link to see all content affiliated with them.

Also in these lenses

  • future perfect curriculum display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Mark Dominic Kalil's Lens for general enquiry but focussed on a transformational curriculum
    By: Mark Dominic KalilAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History (Organized by Region)"

    Click the "future perfect curriculum" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Central and Northern Asia: A.D. 1301 to 1400

Module by: Jack E. Maxfield. E-mail the author

CENTRAL AND NORTHERN ASIA

Back to Central and Northern Asia: A.D. 1201 to 1300

The old Kipchak area (Turkistan to South Russia) and most of Siberia fell in this century to the last tornado of nomadism – Timurlane1. This man, descended in the female line from Genghis Khan, but otherwise chiefly Turkish in origin, was born south of Samarkand in 1336 and developed into a nomad of the old savage school, creating an empire of desolation and piles of skulls. As a young man he was made governor of a large area under the Mongol conqueror, Tughlak Timor Khan and then drove the invaders out of Transoxiana (now Uzbekistan) by the time he was 33 years old. For four decades he rampaged through Asia. With one of the greatest armies ever seen on the- Siberian steppe, he campaigned against Toktamish of the Golden Horde and soon ruled a vast land south of Moscow. His warriors wore armor of link mail, carried two bows - one for rapid shooting and one for long distance, as well as 30 arrows, a small shield and a scimitar. Each man had two horses. Timur spoke both Turkic and Persian and surrounded himself with scholars, historians and poets. He resurrected Samarkand, bringing scientists and philosophers and building schools and libraries, wide avenues and glittering palaces and mosques. At its height his empire extended from Turkey to Moscow to Mongolia to Delhi. As the century ended he was temporarily in control of all of Iraq, Persia and central Asia - the area known as the Timurid Emirate. (Ref. 220)

In the meantime, the Chinese Ming armies had gained complete control of Inner Mongolia by 1370 and then they pushed the Mongols out of Manchuria and Outer Mongolia beyond Karakorum, almost to Lake Baikal and northwest to Hami, in modern Sinkiang province, opening the gateway to central Asia. In western Asia (and eastern Russia) the Mongols were not driven out but became assimilated into the numerically superior Turkish-speaking warrior population. Subordination to the Great Khan in Peking ceased to have even ritual significance.

NOTE: Insert Map 42. Asia c1300 and The Empires of Genghis Khan and Tamerlane

It has been mentioned several times in this outline that the Mongol horsemen brought plague-infected rodents or at least carried the disease organism from India into the Eurasian steppe. In this 14th century the bacillus became endemic among burrowing rodents in the steppe and the nomad populations became exposed to a lethal infection of a kind never known before. Radical depopulation and even abandonment of some excellent pasture land was the result. (Ref. 279)

Tibet remained quite isolated, but Chinese influence began to be evident in their paintings, side by side with Indian characteristics. It was in this century that Tibet evolved the theocracy which persisted into the 20th century, centering the religious and administrative power in one person, whose succession was assured by the people's belief in reincarnation. The name "Dalai Lama" was not used, however, until the 16th century. (Ref. 12, 19, 228)

Forward to Central and Northern Asia: A.D. 1401 to 1500

Footnotes

  1. Also known as Timur-i-lend (the Persian for "Timur the Lame), Tamerlane or simply as Timur

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks