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Introduction to the Method of Geographical Presentation

Module by: Jack E. Maxfield. E-mail the author

The eight geographical regions of the world referred to above will now be presented, one region at a time, with accompanying semi-diagrammatic map-plates. All of these are drawn to the exact same scale and on each the region to be discussed will be outlined in green. Subdivisions will be indicated as well as possible, and shown in different colors. The map-diagrams are not drawn on the classical Mercator projection, but rather with all latitude lines drawn straight, rather than with the usual curve. This allows one to easily appreciate east-west relationships at a glance. The latitude lines, drawn at 10° intervals, are thus approximately 690 statute miles apart and longitude lines which are also at 10°intervals will be the same distance apart near the equator. As one approaches either of the earth’s poles, however, these lines converge and are separated by progressively shorter distances. All maps on a flat surface purporting to represent a portion of a sphere will have distortion and these are no exception, with the peripheries deformed particularly by the method of constructing the longitude lines as a series of straight segments. These figures are presented so that one can make comparisons of the various geographical regions as to size, latitude, and adjacent relationships.

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

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