Skip to content Skip to navigation

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » The Indian Subcontinent: A.D. 701 to 800

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • OrangeGrove display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Florida Orange Grove Textbooks
    By: Florida Orange GroveAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History"

    Click the "OrangeGrove" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • JVLA Affiliated

    This module is included inLens: Jesuit Virtual Learning Academy Affiliated Material
    By: Jesuit Virtual Learning AcademyAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History"

    Click the "JVLA Affiliated" link to see all content affiliated with them.

  • Bookshare

    This module is included inLens: Bookshare's Lens
    By: Bookshare - A Benetech InitiativeAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History"

    Comments:

    "Accessible versions of this collection are available at Bookshare. DAISY and BRF provided."

    Click the "Bookshare" link to see all content affiliated with them.

Also in these lenses

  • future perfect curriculum display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Mark Dominic Kalil's Lens for general enquiry but focussed on a transformational curriculum
    By: Mark Dominic KalilAs a part of collection: "A Comprehensive Outline of World History (Organized by Region)"

    Click the "future perfect curriculum" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

The Indian Subcontinent: A.D. 701 to 800

Module by: Jack E. Maxfield. E-mail the author

THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT

The Moslems became established in the Indus Valley, taking Sind in A.D. 711, and they also took over the central Asian oases north of the Hindu Kush, while Moslem shipping took over control of the Indian Ocean, thus almost isolating Hindu India. The Himalayan borderlands remained beyond Moslem reach. Kashmir and Bengal had become powerful states soon after the 6th century and continued throughout the period under review. Magnificent Buddhist temples were constructed in Kashmir at this time. (Ref. 275) There were no powers in the north of India equal to those in the south but by the end of this century two new dynasties, the Palas of Bengal and the Pratiharas of Rajasthan began a struggle for the control of northern India. The former were Buddhists with strong ties to Tibet and kept the old religion alive at a time when it was disappearing elsewhere in India. It was from this group that Tibet got their Tantric form of Buddhism in this century. The Guijaras of western India united with Pratihara and together they succeeded in keeping out the Moslems for another two centuries.

In the Deccan, the Rashtrakutas overthrew the Chalukyas in 753 and began a 200 year rule. They built the greatest of the Indian rock-cut temples. The warrior kings of the Pallava continued to rule a part of the Deccan, however, as they had for almost 500 years and in their empire assemblies of village leaders, guilds and professional groups were held annually, making a unique form of democracy. At the last of the century, in the east, the eastern Chalukya Dynasty began to exert some control as a Buddhist clan with unique Buddhist bronzes. Kalinga was ruled by the eastern Gangas. In southern India, there- was conflict between Jains and the adherents of Shivaism which sometimes led to massacres. (Ref. 137, 8, 68, 213, 19)

Scientific activity continued in India, with advancement particularly in mathematics - including rules for finding permutations and combinations, the square root of two and the solving of indeterminate equations of second degree - all features unknown in Europe until the time of Euler, 1,000 years later. The staple crops were wheat, rice and some millet. Exports were cotton textiles and spices, while the most sought after import was the horse. (Continue on page 497)

Content actions

Download module as:

Add module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks