Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » ELEC 301 Projects Fall 2008 » Conclusions and Future Work

Navigation

Table of Contents

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • Rice University ELEC 301 Projects

    This collection is included inLens: Rice University ELEC 301 Project Lens
    By: Rice University ELEC 301

    Click the "Rice University ELEC 301 Projects" link to see all content affiliated with them.

Also in these lenses

  • Lens for Engineering

    This collection is included inLens: Lens for Engineering
    By: Sidney Burrus

    Click the "Lens for Engineering" link to see all content selected in this lens.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.
 

Conclusions and Future Work

Module by: Jash GUO. E-mail the author

Summary: This module discusses the conclusions for our project and potential future work that could imporve our new approach.

Conclusions

Clearly, our correlation analysis result is consistent with the matching of F205 and F260 as we can see from the two spectra. And in fact, F205 and F260 were painted by Van Gogh in the same month in 1885!

The spectral techniques of our project offer a more efficient and accurate approach to analyzing and sequencing paintings than manual methods. Whole-painting analysis could provide quantitative support for forensic evidence.

The following figure 1 shows the mapping result between all six paintings we worked on. Some paintings have multiple x-ray images due to its big size. Hot spots represent “good matches”. Hot spots along the diagonal are expected as weave density deviations should match in the same painting.

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.jpg)

Figure 2 shows the same mapping result but with only hot spots left. (With correlation coefficient greater than 0.75)

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.jpg)

Future Work

Elimination of NaNs in Thread Counting Densities

NaNs are the result of outrange or multiple frequency peaks in the short time Fourier analysis for sample swatches. The reason for these abnormal frequencies are uncertain yet, might due to the x-ray scanning process, imperfect alignment of threads, etc.

Overlap and Critical Values

How big the correlation coefficient should be when we can say that two paintings match? This could vary much according to the size of paintings, alignment directions (warp or weft) and other facts. In addition, we noticed some peaks usually appear at the edge of our correlation plots. This is because small overlap sometimes results in matching accidently. We are working to find a threshold value for overlap and correlation coefficient.

Averages vs. Deviations

Another part of our project involves the Thread Count Average match between paintings which could be used collaborate with the result shown here to reach a more convincing analysis for art forensics.

Applications in Other Fields

Our research philosophy could extend to many related signal processing areas such as speech analysis, image identification and so on. The methods and techniques we developed could be employed not only for canvas paintings but also similar texture materials.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks