Skip to content Skip to navigation

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Year 1 Review - The Impact of Open Source Software on Education

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

In these lenses

  • FOSS display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Open Source
    By: Ross GardlerAs a part of collection: "The Impact of Open Source Software on Education"

    Comments:

    "General content on open source"

    Click the "FOSS" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Year 1 Review - The Impact of Open Source Software on Education

Module by: Ken Udas. E-mail the author

Summary: Summary of the first year of contributions to the OSS and OER in Education Series.

Note:

Author - Ken Udas, Series Themes and CBPP. Originally submitted August 31st, 2007 to the OSS and OER in Education Series, Terra Incognita blog (Penn State World Campus), edited by Ken Udas.

I have tried to tie together some of the themes that were generated in the Impact of OSS and OER on Education Series. I have posted the results on WikiEducator under the title Overview of the OSS and OER in Education Series. It is now available for review, editing, critique, etc. Please feel free to visit the wiki, update and add to it.

One of the important underlying themes that I noted while reviewing the posts and dialog was implicit and explicit reference to Commons Based Peer Production (CBPP). CBPP is essentially the model that describes why OSS and OER work. It accounts for why individuals forming groups of varying sizes will create information and cultural assets with a net common-good impact for non-monetary rewards.

The model is based on the assertion that information resources are truly public-good resources in that they are non-rival; that is, the use of an information resource by an additional individual does not reduce the source of information, unlike physical resources. The model helps explain the nature of motivation and incentives that would normally be provided by restrictive intellectual property licensing, and identifies the circumstances under which CBPP is more efficient than other forms of organization.

The grist for the CBPP model is being able to treat information as a “Public Good.” That is, it can be freely used as a source for the generation of new information. Without source information, the cost of producing new information increases. In addition, if the information product is treated as anything other than a non-rival public good, the motivation for contributing to a commons in which the right to use is guaranteed is virtually eliminated and the pool of available resources is diminished.

Given the current practice of converting information assets generated through public funding into private property, we might ask, “is CBPP is a viable model for sustained development?” This question, in the context of University Research Patents, is thoughtfully treated in a recent posting on e-Literate titled Should Universities Patent Their Research? Universities Say Yes. But should they?. In the posting by guest blogger James Farmer, rampant patenting for short-term gain is placed in opposition to the social good that can come from forgoing patents without a well articulate social-good rationale. There is a strong voice for socially responsible patenting (and non-patenting) and a recognition that removing information from the public commons can have a net negative impact on society.

Although we can point to successful applications of OSS, which inspired Yochai Benkler to articulate CBPP in his article Coase’s penguin, Linux and the nature of the firm, it is important to ask under what conditions is the environment simply too toxic or (open information) impoverished to support the production of information assets based on the value of an open information commons.

Comments

kevingreen - September 2nd, 2008 at 3:18 pm For any questions related to patents (as I have seen in your article), I have found that patents.com always seems to have some good information.

Content actions

Download module as:

Add module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks