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1882 Minutes of the New York Etching Club

Module by: Stephen Fredericks. E-mail the authorEdited By: Frederick Moody, Ben Allen

Summary: Minutes of the New York Etching Club's sixth year.

Minutes of the New York Etching Club -- buy from Rice University Press.

1882 Events

  • The New York Etching Club held its annual exhibition in January at the National Academy of Design. The club published a catalogue to accompany and document the event. It was illustrated with eight original etchings and included an illustrative account, written by James D. Smillie, of the group’s first meeting in November 1877.
  • The Society of Painter-Etchers, London’s First Annual Exhibition, was held. It included 207 prints by eighty-five artists.
  • The Etchers Society was founded in Great Britain by Herkomer.
  • The Scratchers Club of Brooklyn was founded on January 25.
  • Poets and Etchers was published by J. R. Osgood and Company of Boston, Massachusetts. This very early prototype of an “artist’s book” includes only original etchings and poetry.
  • Dr. Seymour Haden visited the United States in the winter of 1882/1883 and toured Philadelphia, New York, Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, Cincinnati, Buffalo, and Baltimore. During this visit, he delivered many lectures on etching to sell-out crowds numbering in the hundreds.
  • The Philadelphia Society of Etchers held its First Annual Exhibition from December 27, 1882, thru February 3, 1883, at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. The Society’s membership included New York Etching Club Non-resident Members Peter Moran and Joseph Pennell of Philadelphia; and Resident Members Frederick S. Church, Henry Farrer, Robert Swain Gifford, James D. Smillie, George Smillie, Thomas Moran, and Charles Platt.

January 24th 1882

The Regular Meeting of the Club was held at this date in the Secretary’s studio.

It was called to order at 9 P. M. with Messers. Farrer, Wood, Church, Falconer, Gifford, Deilman and Nicoll present.

Messers Chas. A. Platt and S. G. McCutheon were unanimously elected Resident Members.

Matters relating to the approaching exhibition were informally discussed but no further action being taken the meeting adjourned at

ten o’clock.

J. C. Nicoll

Secty.

Approved Mch 31-82

Figure 1: Photographic image of the National Academy of Design, 1882. (Collection of The New-York Historical Society, n.n. 80865d.)
Figure 1 (graphics1.jpg)

Friday, March 31st 1882

A meeting of the Club was held at this date with thirteen members present – viz: Messers Baldwin, Chase, Church, Dielman, Falconer, Farrer, Mc Cutcheon, Thos. Moran, Nicoll, Platt, J. D. Smillie, van Elten, & Wood.

The minutes of the last meetings held Nov 11 & Dec.16th 1881 and Jany 24th 1882 were read and upon formal motion duly seconded & unanimously carried.

The action taken at these meetings was ratified.

The following amendments to the Constitution were proposed – viz:

Art. II. Sec. 6 Any Resident – Member neglecting to attend the regular meetings of the Club for one year, or failing to contribute to each annual Exhibition shall thereby forfeit his membership unless, upon furnishing sufficient reason he shall be excused by special vote of the Club.

also the following.

To substitute the words “Society of American Etchers” for the words “New York Etching Club” wherever these appear in the present Constitution.

The report of Mr. Geo H. Galt upon sales of Etchings made at the last exhibition was read.

The following names were presented as Non Resident Members. – viz:

Joseph Pennel of Philadelphia, by Messers Platt, J. D. Smillie & Falconer

Mr. Otto Bacher of Munich by Messers Chase, Dielman & Falconer

Mr. Frank Duveneck, by Messers Chase, Church, & Falconer.

J. C. Nicoll

Secty.

Approved April 14/82

Figure 2: Thomas Waterman Wood, Fresh Eggs, 1882. (Williams Print Collection.)
Figure 2 (graphics2.jpg)

April 14th 1882

The Annual meeting was held at this date in the Secretary’s studio.

Called to order at 8.30 P.M. by the president with the following members present – viz: Messers Baldwin, Chase, Church, Colman, Falconer, Farrer, Gifford McCutcheon, Thos. Moran, Nicoll, Platt, Sabin, Geo. H. Smillie, J. D. Smillie, van Elten, Wood. – 16.

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

The Treasures Report was read and approved.

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year. – viz:

Henry Farrer—President

J. C. Nicoll—Secretary & Treasurer.

F. S. Church, Thomas Moran, Frederick Dielman—Executive Committee

The Following gentlemen were elected Non-Resident members. Viz:

Joseph Pennel of Philadelphia

Otto Bacher Munich

Frank Duvencek L.

Figure 3: Charles S. Platt. (Private collection.)
Figure 3 (graphics3.jpg)

Messers Robt. C. Minor & Geo W. Maynard were proposed for Resident Membership by A. H. Baldwin.

The amendment to the constitution to be known as Art II. Sec. 6. was adopted unanimously.

The amendment proposing to change the name was lost.

Upon motion it was resolved to select by ballot the names of ten members who should be requested to prepare plates for the illustrated catalogue of the next Exhibition - the Executive Committee to fill any vacancies that afterwards occurred.1

The names were then chosen.

R. Swain Gifford 14 votes Saml Colman 12

J. D. Smillie 14 F. S. Church 9

C. A. Platt 13 A. F. Bellows 8

Thos. Moran 13 Joseph Pennel 10

Wm Chase 11 Otto Bacher 7

C. A. Vanderhoff 7.

No other business being presented the meeting adjourned.

J. C. Nicoll

Secty.

October 16th 1882

A special meeting was held at this date in Mr. Farrer’s studio.

The meeting was called to order by the President at 8 30 P.M. with ten members present viz: - Messers Baldwin, Chase, Church, Dielman, Farrer, Th. Moran, Nicoll, Geo. H. Smillie, van Elten and Yale.

A letter was read from R. W. Gilder announcing the intended visit of Dr. Seymour Hayden of London, and asking if the Club could do anything towards facilitating his proposed scheme of delivering a course of three lectures in this city upon Etching.

After considerable discussion the members present being in favor of the Club’s doing something in the matter, upon motion duly seconded and carried, the President appointed Messers Yale, and Geo H. Smillie a committee to confer with the Union League Club to see if their theatre could be obtained for delivery of the lectures, and to obtain such other information as might seem desirable. – The meeting adjourned without further action.

J. C. Nicoll, Secty.

Figure 4: James Craig Nicoll. (Courtesy of Ms. Rona Schneider.)
Figure 4 (graphics4.jpg)

October 25th 1882

A special meeting was held at this date in Mr. Farrers studio.

The meeting was called to order by the President at 830 P.M. with nine members present – viz: Messers Baldwin, Th. Moran, Shirlaw, Church, Sabin, Geo. Smillie, van Elten, Deilman, Farrer & Yale.

Dr. Yale reported as the results of the conference with the Committee of the Union League Club that the Union League Theatre could not be used for Dr. Seymour Haydens lectures, but the Art Committee were very desirous that the N. Y. Etching Club should get up an exhibition of etchings by its members for November 9th – the Union League Club to give a reception shortly afterward to Mr. Haden.2

After considerable discussion it was moved, seconded and carried that the Etching Club accept the invitation to exhibit.

Upon motion of Dr. Yale, duly seconded and carried the Committee to obtain information in regard to Dr. Haden’s lectures and other matters was increased to five members, as follows, Messers Yale, J. D. Smillie, Geo. H. Smillie, Nicoll, and Thos. Moran.

The meeting the adjourned to Thursday, November 20 at 8 P.M.

J. C. Nicoll

Secty.

Figure 5: Page from the 1882 New York Etching Club exhibition catalogue. (Private collection.)
Figure 5 (graphics5.jpg)
Figure 6: Walter Shirlaw, Reprimand, 1882. (Williams Print Collection.)
Figure 6 (graphics6.jpg)

November 2nd – 1882

The adjourned special meeting met at this date in Mr Nicoll’s studio.

The meeting was called to order by the President at 830 P.M. with nine members present – viz: Messers Baldwin, Chase, Church, Dielman, Farrer, Thos Moran, J, C, Nicoll, Sartain, J. D. Smillies, van Elten.

The minutes of the meeting held October 16th were read and approved.

After free discussion upon the report of the Committee upon Dr. Haden’s lectures presented by Mr. Moran, it was moved seconded and carried. - That the members of this Club are unanimous in their desire to do all in their power to promote the success of Dr. Haden’s lectures, but do not consider it advisable to undertake the management of said lectures.

Figure 7: Peter Moran, Harvest San Juan, 1882-83. (Williams Print Collection.)
Figure 7 (graphics7.jpg)

It was also resolved – that a committee be appointed to offer to Dr. Seymour Haden and Mr. Hubert Herkomer the courtesies of the Etching Club and to invite the to attend an informal meeting of the Club.

The President appointed to constitute this committee Messers, Yale, J. D. Smillie, Chase, Thos. Moran, and Nicoll.

The meeting then adjourned without further action.

J. C. Nicoll

Secty.

Figure 8: John M. Falconer, Morning Down South, 1882. (Williams Print Collection.)
Figure 8 (graphics8.jpg)

December 8th 1882

The regular monthly meeting was held at this date in the Secretary’s studio, with Messers Church, Farrer, Th. Moran, Nicoll, and Sabin present.

There being no quorum it was decided that the Executive Committee should transact the necessary business.

Messers Thos. Moran & A. H. Baldwin were appointed as Hanging Committee for the ensuing year.

Mr. Geo. H. Galt was appointed as salesman for the next annual Exhibition.

The Committee then adjourned without further business.

J. C. Nicoll

Secty.

Approved Feb 16/83

Figure 9: 1882 Salmagundi Sketch Club exhibition catalogue cover page.
Figure 9 (salmagundi-cover.jpg)

Full 1882 Salmagundi Sketch Club exhibition catalogue.

Footnotes

  1. The New York Etching Club’s 1883 catalogue was illustrated with nine etchings by William Merritt Chase, Frederick Stuart Church, R. Swain Gifford, Thomas Moran, James Craig Nicoll, Joseph Pennell, Charles Adams Platt, Walter Shirlaw, and Thomas Waterman Wood. Thomas Waterman Wood, Walter Shirlaw, and James Craig Nicoll etchings were substituted for Otto Bacher, Albert F. Bellows, Samuel Colman, James D Smillie, and Charles A. Vanderhoff.
  2. A thorough search of the archives at the Union League Club turned up no record of either the referenced reception for Dr. Seymour Haden or an impromptu exhibition by the New York Etching Club, though both the reception and exhibition may well have occurred.

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