Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax_CNX

You are here: Home » Content » The New York Etching Club Minutes » 1884 Minutes of the New York Etching Club

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • Rice Digital Scholarship display tagshide tags

    This collection is included in aLens by: Digital Scholarship at Rice University

    Click the "Rice Digital Scholarship" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • Ricepress display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Rice University Press Titles
    By: Rice University Press

    Click the "Ricepress" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

1884 Minutes of the New York Etching Club

Module by: Stephen Fredericks. E-mail the authorEdited By: Frederick Moody, Ben Allen

Summary: Minutes of the New York Etching Club's eighth year.

Minutes of the New York Etching Club -- buy from Rice University Press.

1884 Events

  • The New York Etching Club held its annual exhibition from February 4 through March 1 at the National Academy of Design, and published a catalogue, illustrated with original etchings, to accompany and record the show.
  • In 1884, the Society of Painter-Etchers exhibited in a separate section of the 14th Autumn Exhibition of Modern Pictures at the Walker Gallery, Liverpool. The following members of the New York Etching Club had work included in this show: Frederick S. Church, Samuel Colman, Frederick Dielman, John M. Falconer, Henry Farrer, I. M. Gaugengigl, Robert S. Gifford, James A. S. Monks, Mary Nimmo Moran, Peter Moran, Thomas Moran, J. C. Nicoll, Stephen Parrish, Joseph Pennell, Charles A. Platt, George. H. Smillie, James D. Smillie, Charles A. Vanderhoof, and Kruseman van Elten.
  • The Association of Canadian Etchers was founded in Toronto on July 23, 1884.
  • A Catalogue of Etchings by Stephen Parrish, 1879-1883, was privately published and released by the artist. Descriptions of the plates and ten etchings made specifically for the volume were included in this unique prototype of the modern catalogue raisonné.1 Nine of the etchings in the catalogue are miniature reproductions of larger originals; one was made specifically for the catalogue.

January 11th 1884-

A Special meeting was held at this date in the Secretary’s studio. It was called to order by the President at half past eight P. M. with messers – Farrer, Dielman, Moran, Nicole, Sabin, and Wood, present.

The proposition of Messers Cassell & Co. to publish an additional volume of “Original Etchings by American Artists” upon the same general conditions as last year was considered. After considerable discussion, certain changes in the wording and conditions of the proposed circular were suggested and the following resolution passed.

Resolved. That the proposition of Messers Cassell & Co. to publish a second volume of “Original Etchings by American Artists is hereby accepted, and the Executive Committee are authorized to make all necessary arrangements.2

Adjourned at ten P. M.

J. C. Nicoll,

Secty.

February 15th 1884

The regular meeting was held at this date in the Secretary’s studio.

It was called to order by the president at nine P. M. with eight members present viz: - Messers, Church, Farrer, Gifford, Thos. Moran, Nicoll Sabin, J. D. Smillie, Wood.

The minutes of the meetings held December 14th 1883 and January 11 1884 were read and approved.

Mr. Waltet Satterlee was elected Resident Member 7 yes 1 no

Mr. I. M. Gaugengigl of Boston was elected Non-resident Member – unanimously.

Mr. J. A. Monks was nominated for Resident Member by Mr. Thos Moran.

The Secretary read a letter from the Society of Graphic Arts, Vienna, asking for plates for work representing the progress of graphic arts during the past fifty years, together with his answer thereto; and stated what action he had taken in the matter.

Upon formal vote his action was approved, and he was directed to conduct any further correspondence necessary. He was instructed to state in his next letter that the members present objected to send original plates owing to risk of loss or damage, - also to the sending of clean wiped proofs to be reproduced by any “process” work. – They would be willing to send approved proofs from which the Society of Graphic Arts could select, or would more strongly urge that the Club itself should make the selection. In either case the election to be made here.

The meeting adjourned without further action.

J. C. Nicoll

Secty.

Approved April 18/84

Figure 1: Samuel Colman’s etching in the 1884 New York Etching Club exhibition catalogue. (Private collection.)
Figure 1 (graphics1.jpg)

April 18th 1884

The annual meeting was held at this date in the Secretary’s studio.

It was called to order by the President with Messers Baldwin, Church, Dielman, Farrer, Thos. Moran, Nicoll, and Van Elten.

The minutes of the meeting held February 15th were read and approved.

The Secretary made an informal report upon the sales of the last exhibition ($1748.75) cost of catalogue ($547.50) and balance in the treasury. ($80.87)

The ballot for officers for the ensuing year resulted in the re-election of those serving at the time viz: -

President, Henry Farrer,

Secty. & Tres. J. C. Nicoll.

Executive Cttee F. S. Church, F. Dielman, T. Moran.

Mr. J. A. S. Monks was elected Resident Member.

Mr. Jno. H. Millspaugh was nominated for Resident Member by the Secretary.

The meeting adjourned without further action.

J. C. Nicoll

Secty. Approved Dec 12

Figure 2: Robert S. Gifford, Neopolitan, 1884. (Williams Print Collection.)
Figure 2 (graphics2.jpg)

May 19th 1884

A meeting of the Executive Committee was held at this date in the Secretary’s studio to examine and select etchings for the second volume of “Original Etchings by American Artists” to be published by Messers Cassell & Company.

The Executive Committee also directed that the following gentlemen should be invited to make small plates for the catalogue of the next annual exhibition viz – Messers Thomas Moran

R. Swain Gifford F. S. Church

J. C. Nicoll Fredk Dielman

L. M. Yale Walter Satterlee

J. A.S. Monks

Messer Platt, Gaugengigl, Pennell and Wood, as alternatives in case any of those first chosen should be unable to contribute3

J. C. Nicoll

Secty.

Figure 3: Stephen Parrish, London Bridge, 1884. (Williams Print Collection.)
Figure 3 (graphics3.jpg)

December 12 1884

The regular meeting was held at this date in the Secretary’s studio with Messers Baldwin, Church, Dielman, Farrer, Thos. Moran, Nicoll, Shirlaw, and Wood, present.

The minutes of the meeting held April 18th were read and approved.

Messers Thomas Moran, and J. A. S. Monks were elected to serve as Hanging Committee for the ensuing year.

The nomination of Mr. Benj. Landu for Resident member was laid upon the table.4

Mr. Hamilton Hamilton was nominated for Active Member by Mr. Thomas Moran. Mr. Alexander Schilling of Chicago was nominated as Non-resident Member by the Secretary.

The matter of plates for the next catalogue and some other items was discussed informally but no regular action taken, and the

meeting adjourned at ten P. M.

J. C. Nicoll

Secty.

Figure 4: Ignatz M. Gaugengigl, Untitled, 1884. (Williams Print Collection.)
Figure 4 (graphics4.jpg)

Footnotes

  1. In the New York Public Library’s copy of the Stephen Parrish catalogue is a note to then-print collection curator Weidenkampf, dated August 31,1915: “Dear Mr. Weidenkampf: I have yours of yesterday about the extra catalogue. Oh do not return it! You think more highly of it than it deserves. I had but 50 copies of it made, gave some to collectors and friends and had 10 or a dozen left. I sent one a few days ago to a man interested in Etching, and wrote him he could look it over and then consign it to a top shelf amidst the dust from which I had just taken it in my studio. To me, my own Etching has had its day as ‘every dog has’ his. You have given me no trouble in the matter whatever and I shall be glad to hear from you always, believe me. Sincerely yours Stephen Parrish.”
  2. The referenced volume of etchings was indeed published by Cassell & Co. and released in 1885. An earlier volume involving New York Etching Club members, published in 1883, was also released by Cassell & Co.
  3. The New York Etching Club’s 1885 catalogue was illustrated with eight etchings by Frederick S. Church, Henry Farrer, James A.S. Monks, Mary Nimmo Moran, Peter Moran, Thomas Moran, James Craig Nicoll, and Walter Saterlee. Henry Farrer, Mary Nimmo Moran, and Peter Moran etchings were substituted in the 1885 exhibition catalogue for any by Dielman, Yale, or the proposed alternatives: Platt, Gaugengigl, or Pennell.
  4. Benjamin Lander independently exhibited prints in each show between 1882 and 1887, but never became a member.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks