Skip to content Skip to navigation

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Summary - Content is Infrastructure

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

In these lenses

  • FOSS display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Open Source
    By: Ross GardlerAs a part of collection: "The Impact of Open Source Software on Education"

    Comments:

    "General content on open source"

    Click the "FOSS" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Summary - Content is Infrastructure

Module by: Ken Udas. E-mail the author

Summary: Summary of David Wiley's post about the role of open content in open education.

“Content Is Infrastructure,” the 14th installment of the Impact of Open Source Software Series, was posted on October 3rd, 2007, by David Wiley who currently serves as an Associate Professor of Instructional Technology and also the Director of the Center for Open and Sustainable Learning, (C()SL), at Utah State University. Thanks David for a great posting!

In his posting David starts by suggesting that “Content is Infrastructure,” and then makes three related statements (relative to the development of education):

  1. I wish to point out that content is absolutely critical.
  2. I want to suggest that we must understand that content is infrastructure before we can see radical improvements in education.
  3. We have to understand that content is infrastructure to see current “open educational resources” projects and initiatives from the proper perspective.

David used physical infrastructure in the form of public roads as an analogy for content as digital education infrastructure. He suggested that as roads allow for development and innovation, content (without toll fees) allows similarly for innovation to take place in education. Unlike roads though, content infrastructure is much more effectively developed through massively parallel, trial, and error processes than through a formally architected approach.

Comments

David’s “roads” analogy generated a fair amount of discussion leading to extension of the analogy and discussion about the “economics” of creating and sustaining content infrastructure. Issues such as the difference between physical and non-physical assets, rival and non-rival goods, the impact of “tolls” or use fees, barriers, and incentives were discussed.

There was also some dialog about how individuals will show interest in and verbally support open content, but when “push comes to shove” few will actually make their resources open. Issues around the competitive nature of higher education were raised. It was noted that the free software movement is quite competitive and that competition seems to work well in that domain, which led to some questions about using the competitive impulse at many universities to promote open and free resources.

It was also noted, early in the discussion that David’s “content as infrastructure” approach to OER was refreshingly direct and pragmatic.

Thanks again to David, for his interesting and insightful post and responses, and Wayne, Cole, and Martin (RedSevenOne), for making this a great exchange, and other folks who have been reading along. Please join in again on October 17th when Gary Schwartz posts with persepctis from a OSS project manager. The schedule for the series can be found on WikiEducator.

Content actions

Download module as:

Add module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks