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The Facts

Module by: John Bosco. E-mail the author

     
Although the number of facts is infinite, A Unified Theory of a Law teaches that the best way to arrange them is according to the following principles:

     
The subject of a law is conduct. Conduct flows. It flows from a Source to a Recipient. Conduct that reaches a Recipient is called consequences. Furthermore, a flow of conduct from Source to Recipient is done in circumstances. Circumstances are the context through which conduct flows. Hence, a flow of conduct from Source to Recipient through circumstances is the factual aspect of a law. The factual mantra of A Unified Theory of a Law is conduct flowing from a Source to a Recipient through circumstances. Repeat it over and over again until it falls trippingly from the tongue.

     
Moreover, conduct flowing from Source to Recipient through circumstances has two important characteristics:

  • It is mono-directional. It always flows from a Source to a Recipient. The Source is upstream; the Recipient is downstream. Conduct never flows the other way.
  • Furthermore, it has polarity. The flow is either on or off. When on, a flow of conduct is described as being “affirmative”. When off, as “negative”. There is absolutely no difference between affirmative conduct and negative conduct other than its polarity. The function of the word, 'not' in A Unified Theory of a Law is simply to reverse the polarity of conduct. 'Not' turns affirmative conduct into negative conduct.

     
Direction and polarity are the two significant properties of conduct as it flows from Source to Recipient through circumstances.

     
What proof do we have that the subject of a law is conduct? Have you ever wondered why, in general, there are only two types of litigant in a court of law? Why only a plaintiff and a defendant? Why not more? Why not less? There are two types of litigant in a court of law because the focus of a court a law is conduct and conduct has only two ends. On one of its ends is the Source of conduct - who, in a court, is called a defendant; on the other end is the Recipient of conduct - who, in a court, is called a plaintiff. If conduct had one end or three ends instead of two, the number of litigants would be a number other than two.

     
A Unified Theory of a Law has developed a graphic to help you organize the legal ideology being taught. The graphic is called the Triangle of Law. As we progress, it is helpful to keep it in mind. There are three relationships in A Unified Theory of a Law one of which is factual and two of which are legal. Hence, the geometric shape of a triangle whose three sides represent the three relationships found in A Unified Theory of a Law. The factual relationship is depicted at the base of the Triangle of Law. The process of making a law is simple. A Lawmaker perched at the acme of the Triangle of Law despises conduct flowing from a Source to a Recipient through circumstances and picks one of the three core permutations of a law to apply to it rejecting the other two.

The Triangle of a Law

John Bosco
Project Director
The Legal Literacy Project

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Definition of a lens

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A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

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