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Talking about satellites

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

NATURAL SCIENCES

Grade 4

PLANET EARTH AND THE UNIVERSE

Module 38

TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES

Activity:

To talk about satellites

[LO 1.3, 3.1]

Objects that travel along a route or path in outer space are in an orbit.

Rockets or space shuttles propel satellites into space to where they are placed in an orbit where they have to keep travelling at the correct speed. When they travel too fast, they will veer off into outer space. If they are too slow, they will fall to the earth. People on earth use computers to control the speed of the satellites.

The use of satellites

Hold a group discussion about the uses of satellites and see how many your group can name. Give feedback to the class and write down the best ideas in the space below.

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

Where do satellites come from?

The following sentences have become mixed up. See if you can place them in the correct order by arranging the correct numbers in the blocks below.

1. In 1957 the Russians sent the first man-made satellite into space. Its name was Sputnik 1. Try to find more information on Sputnik 1.

2. Isaac Newton believed that people were able to make satellites that could orbit the Earth in the same way as the moon. But he needed something to get the satellite into space.

3. In 1961, Yuri Gagarin was the first person to be sent into space. After this, satellites were sent into space on a regular basis.

4. In 1929, Robert Goddard, an American, built a rocket that did not go very high, but this started the development of the technology that was needed.

5. In 1957 the Americans also tried to launch a satellite, the Vanguard, but it exploded on the launching pad!

6. In 1957 a dog called Laika was sent into space in Sputnik 2, and this showed that living creatures could travel in space.

Something interesting: Make your own action picture book.

  • Draw 32 blocks of the same size on a clean sheet of paper. Your teacher will show you pictures of a spacecraft being launched as an example. You can draw this or choose your own theme for your picture book.
  • Now draw a picture in each block showing the spacecraft taking off. Each block must show the craft a little further away from the launching pad and moving up into space. When the pages are bound together, you can let them flip and it will seem as if the spacecraft is lifting off.
  • When all your pictures are complete, cut them out neatly. Make two holes on the one side and place them in the correct order – 1 to 32 with number 1 at the bottom. Thread string through the holes to bind them. You could strengthen it with Sellotape.
  • Now hold your book by the side that is bound and flick through the pages from the back to the front with your other hand. Your picture should move. This should be great fun!

Assessment

LEARNING OUTCOME 1: SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONSThe learner will be able to act confidently on curiosity about natural phenomena, and to investigate relationships and solve problems in scientific, technological and environmental contexts.

Assessment Standard

We know this when the learner

1.3 evaluates data and provides feedback on observations.

LEARNING OUTCOME 3: SCIENCE, SOCIETY AND THE ENVIRONMENTThe learner will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships between science and technology, society and the environment.

Assessment Standard

We know this when the learner

3.1 understands science and technology in the context of history and personal knowledge.

Memorandum

SATELLITES

  • The usefulness of satellites
  • Have a group discussion on the usefulness of satellites and see how many your group can name. Give feedback to the class and write down the best ones. These are good examples:
  • We can communicate with people all over the world by means of telephone, faxes, Internet, e-mail, etc.
  • We can take pictures of space
  • By means of photos we can gain information about what is happening in space and on other planets
  • We can look at earth from space
  • We can predict the weather accurately
  • We can listen to the radio
  • We can watch direct sport broadcasts, even if they happen in other countries

Where and how did satellites originate?

The following sentences have been shuffled. See if you can put them in the right order by placing the numbers correctly in the blocks.

1. Isaac Newton believed it was possible to make a satellite and send it into space to orbit earth, just like the moon. But he needed something to get the satellite into space!

2. An American, Robert Goddard, built a rocket in 1926. It did not go very high, but at least it was the beginning of the technology.

3. In 1957 the Russians sent the first man-made satellite into space. It was called Sputnik 1. See if you can find more information on Sputnik 1.

4. In 1957 a dog called Laika was sent to space in Sputnik 2, to prove that living beings can travel in spacecraft.

5. In 1957 America also tried to launch a satellite, but the Vanguard exploded on the launch pad!

6. In 1961 the first human, Yuri Gagarin, was sent into space. After this, satellites were launched regularly.

  • Something interesting: Make your own action picture booklet.
  • Show enough pictures and books so that learners can get a good idea of satellites.
  • Attached is an example you can show the class. Let them make their own creative booklets.

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