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  • GETIntPhaseMaths display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Siyavula: Mathematics (Gr. 4-6)
    By: Siyavula

    Review Status: In Review

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To solve problems in context

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

MATHEMATICS

Measurement and Time

Length

EDUCATOR SECTION

Memorandum

1. Susan = 3,48

Lala = 3,4

Lauren = 3,2

Anna = 3,12

2. Susan: (2,32 + 3,48 + 3,02 + 2,9) ÷ 4 = 2,93 (2,9 m)

Lala: (3,2 + 3,04 + 2,86 + 3,4) ÷ 4 = 3,125 (3,1 m)

Lauren: (2,88 + 2,96 + 3,06 + 3,2) ÷ 4 = 3,025 (3 m)

Anna: (3,02 + 2,94 + 2,84 + 3,12) ÷ 4 = 2,98 (3 m)

3. (12,95 km + 14,73 km + 8,94 km + 13,8 km + 6,86 km) ÷ 5

= 11,456 km (11,5 km)

4. 11,5 km

LEANER SECTION

Content

ACTIVITY: To solve problems in context [LO 1.6.2]

It is important to be able to calculate averages, because it is something that is commonly used in everyday life. You have heard of average rainfall per month, the average temperature of the place where you live during a particular season, your class average, etc.

1. Take a good look at the following and then write down what the distance of the best jump of each athlete is:

At an athletics meeting four athletes participated in the u.13 long jump for girls.

Each completed four jumps.

Table 1
Name Jump 1 m Jump 2 m Jump 3 m Jump 4 m Best Jump m
Susan 2,32 3,48 3,02 2,9 ____________
Lala 3,2 3,04 2,86 3,4 ____________
Lauren 2,88 2,96 3,06 3,2 ____________
Anna 3,02 2,94 2,84 3,12 ____________
  • By looking at each girl’s best jump, we can determine who won.
  • However, this does not tell us who fared the best in general (over all the jumps).
  • To determine this we have to look at the average of each girl’s jumps.
  • The following is the formula for calculating the average:

Average distance =

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

In Susan’s case it will be calculated as follows:

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)

= 2,93 m (rounded off to the first decimal: 2,9 m)

2. Now use this formula to determine, according to the averages for the four athletes, who generally fared the best in the long jump for u.13 girls (rounded off to the first decimal).

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3. Calculate the average distance that Johan runs per day if he ran the following distances from Monday to Friday:

Mon. 12,95 km; Tue. 14,73 km; Wed. 8,94 km; Thu. 13,8 km; Fri. 6,86 km.

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4. Round off your answer to the first decimal place.

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TIME FOR SELF-ASSESSMENT

We examined particular aspects of measuring in Learning Unit 1. Before starting to work through Learning Unit 2, we have to find out whether there are any hitches, i.e. whether there is anything that you do not understand properly. Show us how you feel about the completed work by neatly colouring the blocks that represent your feelings about the work:

CRITERIA

Table 2
I know the meaning of perimeter. Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
I know the formula for determining the perimeter of a square. (LO 4.8) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
I am able to determine the perimeters of the following figures: Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
Square (LO 4.8) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
Pentagon (LO 4.8) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
Hexagon (LO 4.8) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
Octagon (LO 4.8) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
I am able to determine the perimeter of an irregular figure. (LO 4.8) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
I am able to convert metres to millimetres and vice versa. (LO 4.8) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
I am able to convert metres to centimetres and vice versa. (LO 4.8) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
I am able to convert kilometres to metres and vice versa. (LO 4.5) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
I am able to determine distances according to scale. (LO 1.6) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well
I am able to calculate average distance. (LO 1.6) Not at all Fairly well Well Really well

Assessment

Learning Outcome 1: The learner will be able to recognise, describe and represent numbers and their relationships, and to count, estimate, calculate and check with competence and confidence in solving problems.

Assessment Standard 1.6: We know this when the learner solves problems in context including contexts that may be used to build awareness of other Learning Areas, as well as human rights, social, economic and environmental issues such as:

1.6.2: measurements in Natural Sciences and Technology contexts.

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

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What are tags? tag icon

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