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    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Mathematics (Gr. 4-6)
    By: Siyavula

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To investigate and compare 2-dimensional figures

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

MATHEMATICS

Geometry

EDUCATOR SECTION

Memorandum

1.

1.1 Equally from centre

2.

2.1 180

2.2 1

2.3 360

LEANER SECTION

Content

ACTIVITY: To investigate and compare 2-dimensional figures [LO 3.3.3]

Looking at circles:

1. Have a good look at the sketch and then answer the questions:

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

RQ = Diameter

SP = Radius

1.1 What is a circle?

_____________________________________________________________________

1.2 Where do we come across circles in our daily lives?

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

2. Answer the following questions:

2.1 How many diameters could a circle have? _____________________________

2.2 How many centre points could a circle have? __________________________

2.3 How many radii could a circle have? ________________________________

3. Use a pair of compasses and draw a circle with a:

3.1 radius of 30 mm:

3.2 diameter of 80 mm:

DID YOU KNOW?

We can draw lovely patterns based on circles! The pattern shown

below is known as a paisley design and is used on cloth or clothing.

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)

4. Can you find out how the pattern is created? Try to do it yourself!

5. Follow the steps and use this method for drawing the patterns that follow. Your educator will provide the paper that you need.

Draw a circle Use the same radius for marking the circumference Connect the points (if necessary)

Draw a circle

Figure 3
Figure 3 (graphics3.png)

Use the same radius for marking the circumference

Figure 4
Figure 4 (graphics4.png)

Connect the points (if necessary)

Figure 5
Figure 5 (graphics5.png)

5.1

Figure 6
Figure 6 (graphics6.png)

5.2

Figure 7
Figure 7 (graphics7.png)

5.3

Figure 8
Figure 8 (graphics8.png)

5.4

Figure 9
Figure 9 (graphics9.png)

6. Design your own pattern with circles. Colour it neatly:

Time for self-assessment

It is important to know how well you understand the work that we have done up to now. Read the following criteria. Evaluate yourself on a scale ranging from 1 to 4 by circling the appropriate number.

Table 1
Criteria 1 = Not at all.2 = Just a little.3 = Well.4 = Very well.  
I can explain the term "parallel". 1 2 3 4  
I can explain the difference between a line and a line segment. 1 2 3 4  
I can explain the following concepts:          
* acute angle; 1 2 3 4  
* obtuse angle; 1 2 3 4  
* right angle. 1 2 3 4  
I can use a protractor to:          
* measure angles accurately; 1 2 3 4  
* draw angles accurately. 1 2 3 4  
I can name the similarities between a rectangle and a parallelogram 1 2 3 4  
I can name the differences between a rectangle and a parallelogram. 1 2 3 4  
I can explain the concept "symmetrical". 1 2 3 4  
I can explain the concept "rotational symmetry". 1 2 3 4  
I can explain the following concepts:          
* radius; 1 2 3 4  
* diameter. 1 2 3 4  
I could enlarge and reduce the figures. 1 2 3 4  
I can use circles to draw patterns. 1 2 3 4  
           

Let's look at 3-dimensional figures.

You probably quite often play games that require a die. See if you can make one yourself. Trace the outlines of the following net exactly. Cut it out neatly and fold it to form a die. Then write the numbers 1 to 6 on the sides. Remember that the numbers of the following number pairs (1,6), (3,4) and (2,5) must be on opposite sides.

Figure 10
Figure 10 (graphics10.png)

DID YOU KNOW?

The die that you have just made is an example of a cube.

Take a good look at the following:

Figure 11
Figure 11 (graphics11.png)

Assessment

Learning Outcome 3:The learner will be able to describe and represent characteristics and relationships between two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in a variety of orientations and positions.

Assessment Standard 3.3: We know this when the learner investigates and compares (alone or as a member of a group or team) two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects studied in this grade according to properties listed above by:

3.3.3: using a pair of compasses to draw circles, patterns in circles, and patterns with circles.

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