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Introduction - Amee Godwin

Module by: Ken Udas. E-mail the author

Summary: Introduction to Amee Godwin and her contribution to the Impact of Open Source Software and Open Educational Resources on Education series on Terra Incognita. Godwin writes about OER as an active collaborative process aimed at enhancing teaching and learning.

I want to welcome Amee Godwin and thank her for agreeing to contribute to the Impact of Open Source Software and Open Educational Resources on Education series on Terra Incognita. Her post is scheduled to appear on March 1st, 2008 (eastern U.S.). Amee will be writing about OER as an active collaborative process aimed at enhancing teaching and learning. She will also provide a few examples of the collaborative process from what they are working on, in both the K-12 and higher education spaces.

Figure 1: Amee Godwin
Amee Godwin
Amee Godwin serves as Program Director, OER Commons, Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education (ISKME). Amee Godwin has over a decade of experience in applied research and development of community applications. Her work focuses on connecting technology, education, and collaboration. At ISKME, she guides the development of content, interactivity, and partnerships for OER Commons, a teaching and learning network for open educational resources.

Previously a director of award-winning video documentaries and art director in the commercial film business, Amee earned a Masters in Professional Studies Degree in the Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University, Tisch School of the Arts, and a BA in Media Studies and Art at the Center for Media Study, University of Buffalo. Formerly, at the Interval Research Corporation, she worked in the development of new media applications. While Program Director at the community-led Sanchez Art Center, she created arts education programs and completed a Fellowship from the Arts Leadership for the Future awarded to emerging non-profit leaders and community builders.

Although I knew of Amee and her work for some time, I first met her at the Center for Open and Sustainable Learning (COSL) OpenEd 2007 meeting at Utah State University. I am very much looking forward to Amee’s posting, which will frame OER as a process, connecting dialog with examples of practice. I believe that her posting will help address some of the questions about the impact and direction of OER that were posed in our last posting, Can OER Really Impact Higher Education and Human Development? Please feel free to comment (early and often!), ask questions, build on the conversation, and enjoy.

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