Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax_CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Life Orientation Grade 8 » Apply individual rights and responsibilities in everyday situations

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

In these lenses

  • GETSenPhaseLO display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Siyavula: Life Orientation (Gr. 7-9)
    By: Siyavula

    Collection Review Status: In Review

    Click the "GETSenPhaseLO" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Apply individual rights and responsibilities in everyday situations

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

LIFE ORIENTATION

Grade 8

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND CAREER ORIENTATION

Module 25

INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN EVERYDAY SITUATIONS

Activity 4:

To apply the rights and responsibilities of individuals to situations in everyday life

[LO 2.1]

Case studies

The following are translations of extracts from newspaper reports or letters written to newspapers. Four of the extracts are taken from Die Burger of 10 September 2003, and one is from the Tyger Burger of 6 August 2003.

Read these extracts and discuss them in terms of individual rights and responsibilities in small groups (four learners to a group) or in a class discussion (to be decided by the educator). Note which of the human rights that are mentioned in the Bill of Rights are relevant to each extract. List as many rights and responsibilities as possible in each instance.

Case Number 1:

AFTER HIS FAMILY'S HIJACKING, SOLI'S ONLY WISH IS TO GET BACK HOME

Marenet Jordan

When he heard that his family had been victims in a hijacking, one of the Mother City's well-loved comedians wanted to return home at all costs before a show in Johannesburg was due to start

Two armed men robbed Mrs Tony Philander, wife of Soil Philander, and their four children of their car and seriously injured the family dog at the family home in Rose bank.

Mrs Philander and the children stopped on the driveway to their home in Brandenburg Circus after an outing with her sister from Johannesburg, at about 17:20 yesterday afternoon.

"My eldest daughter, Dania, told me that she saw two men approaching, but she thought they were trying to find shelter from the rain," Mrs. Philander told Die Burger last night.

"But when I saw that one of them had a pistol in his hand, I realised that there was trouble ahead."

The men demanded that she hand over her car keys and handbag.

(Source: Die Burger, 10 September 2003)

  • Relevant rights / responsibilities:

Case Number 2:

NO TO AGE FOR SEX

I refer to the report "ACDP against age for sex" (DB 6/9). I voice my strongest possible objection to this plan.

As a registered voter of this country, medical doctor and mother of a thirteen-year-old girl, I should like to know the motivation behind the proposed lowering of the age of consent to sexual experimentation to between 12 and 16 years, as proposed in the Sexual Offences Amendment Bill.

I regard it as a shocking infringement of the rights of the children of this country to be protected by legislation against sexual exploitation, rape and child prostitution.

There are many teenagers who, in spite of all the information on sexually transmitted diseases, are sexually active by choice from a young age. Likewise, there are many teenagers who abuse drugs, but the latter fact cannot be used to motivate the legalisation of drug use.

How could a responsible government possible justify the proposed legislation on consent to sexual experimentation?

It is time for each parent in South Africa to call the government to book!

CORRESPONDENTDurbanville

(Source: Die Burger, 10 September 2003)

  • Relevant rights / responsibilities:
  • Case Number 3:

Policy: “The majority will be satisfied”

PARENTS TO DECIDE ON WORSHIP IN SCHOOLSALL ORGANISATIONS HAVE BEEN HEARD –

Asmal Alit Redeemer

Parents will in future be able to decide on religious practice at school. Following the finalisation of the religious policy for schools that was announced in Parliament yesterday, the management bodies of schools may decide whether and how they want to present religious practice, provided that the principles of voluntary participation and equality are applied.

According to the policy, the multi-faith nature of a school will be acknowledged by separating learners for religious instruction according to religions.

But it would not be possible to separate learners from different faiths for the regular religious practice during assemblies.

The policy makes provision for religious practice on a rotating basis with consideration of the ratio in which the different religions are represented in the school. In principle, this would mean that the school would give preference to the religion of the majority of the learners.

The policy simultaneously warns that religious practice as part of the school day must be organised in such a way that the multi-faith nature of the country is reflected appropriately.

Further examples of how schools would be able to live out the multi-faith approach would be to read from the texts of the different religions and to offer a universal prayer or to observe a time of silence.

Notwithstanding increased freedom with regard to determining the nature of religious practice, the policy points out that certain aspects of religious practice, for instance special times of prayer, diets, or the wearing of particular items of clothing have to be respected.

Mr Kidder Small, Minister of Education, yesterday said that the voices of all religious organisations have been heard.

He is of the opinion that the policy will satisfy most South Africans. He also said that the policy is a carefully nuance document providing a broad framework within which well-meaning people could work out their own approach. Religious groups and political parties have expressed their support for the policy in spite of suggested amendments that were retained in the final document. Among these was the suggestion that learners should only commence religious instruction at high school level.

According to the policy, instruction will begin in grade R, in which learners will be asked to identify the symbols of their own religion.

Subsequently, they will be exposed to the different religions that are present in South Africa. According to the policy, religious instruction with educational outcomes is seen as a responsibility of the school.

Confessing or sectarian forms of religious doctrine are still seen as inappropriate in a democratic society holding on to diverse religious convictions.

Public schools should refrain from accepting a specific religion or a restricted set of religions that promote specific interests.

According to the policy, instruction in religious doctrine may not form part of the regular school programme, although schools are encouraged to make their facilities available for such programmes.

The policy requires that educators receive special training in religious instruction. The development of learning materials should also be seen as a priority.

(Source: Die Burger, 10 September 2003)

  • Relevant rights / responsibilities:

Case Number 4:

This is a translation of a letter referring to a report titled "Graad 10 is 'n ramp" (Grade 10 is a Disaster) (DB, 5/9).

MOST GRADE 10s ARE BATTLING

School work really is more difficult for the 2003 Grade 10s. Some learners are not up to the task.

Compared to the previous year, they now have to work to a year plan, because they have to prepare themselves for grade 12 in 2005.

Nowadays, precious time is given to portfolio teaching. For this year, CTA (Common Task for Assessment) of Grade 9 learners commences as early as 6 October.

Time therefore is an important factor. Sufficient time for inculcation and "drilling" is something of the past. Basically, six months are available for the completion of the Grade 9 syllabus.

For this reason, remarkable shortcomings are evident, particularly in number subjects.

Skills that used to be taken for granted in the past have become virtual hindrances. Educators battle to complete the year's work of preparing the learners for the following grade.

In many schools, a small number of grade 10 learners see the "drastic about-turn" as a challenge. But many struggle to keep up - especially in overcrowded classes. The leap from Grade 9 (2002) to Grade 10 (2003) was enormous.

Measures to assist the children have to be taken urgently.

CORRESPONDENTGeorge

(Source: Die Burger 10 September 2003)

  • Relevant rights / responsibilities:

Case Number 5:

SADNESS, ANGER STIRS THE HEART

I am filled with great sadness and anger this morning.

My heart felt torn asunder when, speaking to my husband, I was told that a colleague and friend of his had been shot.

At first, my thoughts were of gratitude to God that it had not happened to my husband, but then I was overcome with guilt for having thought in that way.

He had been a human being - a friend, father, son and well-loved colleague. Now he has become a number among the statistics of murdered police force members in our country.

Utter shock and disbelief caused by the event was registered on every face when I arrived at the police station. I had to reach my husband, to touch him and be assured that he was alive.

Pride filled me when I heard that four of the hijackers had already been apprehended and some firearms and stolen goods recovered, [and that] the search for the last suspect was continuing.

That all of the seven hijackers have been apprehended might be a good thing, but the fact that two of then were wounded during the process has had the effect that one of the policemen has had his firearm confiscated and now has to wait for the process of the law to be completed.

We are living in a sick society in which so-called "human rights" are upheld to the extreme.

AGGRIEVED WIFE OF A MEMBER OF THE SAPS

(Source: Die Burger, 6 August 2003)

  • Relevant rights / responsibilities:

The mass media and human rights

The news reports and letters quoted above have all been taken form the same newspaper. Four of them are from the same edition of the particular newspaper. It is evident the newspapers carry a great deal of news dealing with human rights. To a greater of lesser degree, the same is true for other mass media like television and radio.

Therefore it is important that the rights of the media to publish this type of news are protected. Examine the Charter of Human Rights and indicate whether and how the interests of the media are protected under the Charter. Do you think that it is adequate? Explain.

Assessment

Table 1
Learning outcomes (LOs)
LO 1
Promotion of HealthThe learner is able to make informed decisions concerning personal, community and environmental health.
We know this when the learner:
1.1 plans an action in which laws and/or policies for protecting environmental health are applied to address an environmental health issue;
1.2 critically analyses the causes of common diseases in relation to socio-economic and environmental factors;
1.4 indicates that he/she is able to take responsible and informed decisions on personal and environmental safety; and;
1.5 examines a health and safety issue related to violence, and proposes alternatives to violence as well as counter-strategies.

LO 2

Social DevelopmentThe learner is able to demonstrate an understanding of and commitment to constitutional rights and responsibilities, and to show an understanding of diverse cultures and religions.

We know this when the learner:

2.1 discusses the violation of human rights and plans counter strategies;

2.2 explains how democratic processes can be employed to deal with local problems;

2.3 discusses how he / she would promote nation building in different contexts;

2.4 critically evaluates changes in cultural norms and values in terms of personal and community issues; and

2.5 is able to discuss the contributions made to social development by organisations from within different religions.

Table 2
LO 5
Orientation with Regard to the World of WorkThe learner will be able to make informed decisions about further study and career choices.
We know this when the learner:
5.1 identifies and discusses career and study choices and their corresponding requirements;
5.2 investigates career and study opportunities related to own interests and abilities.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks