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  • GETSenPhaseSS display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Siyavula: Social Sciences (Gr. 7-9)
    By: SiyavulaAs a part of collection: "History Grade 8"

    Collection Review Status: In Review

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Freedom of expression

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

Social Sciences

HISTORY

Grade 8

LAND AND POWER

Module 3

FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION

Activity1: Write a letter to the press:

The EditorReaders’ ForumTygerBurgerP.O. Box 747Bellville7535

Dear Sir

No recreational facilities for the youth in our town.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Yours faithfullyDead Bored

John Smith12 Church StreetMountain View744314 March 2003

Feel free to use the following recipe in if you are unsure about how to organise your information for your project.

Heading / title:State your case briefly and meaningfully on a decorated cover page / front page.

Table of contents: The division of your project with the corresponding page numbers appears on this page.

Introduction: This must catch the attention of the reader and you need to explain enthusiastically why you are interested in the topic and how you will approach it, so that the reader will be inquisitive and want to read further.

Contents:Divide your different arguments into separate paragraphs and provide a suitable heading for each grouping of paragraphs.

Conclusion: You need to reach a motivated conclusion, for example by briefly summarising your main points and repeating the answer to your question. Give your own opinion!Look at Freedom of Expression that follows in Source C and Source D.

List of Sources:Take another look at Note 2.

[LO 1.5, 3.3]

What follows is an extract from: The Constitution, Act 108 of 1996From: Chapter 2: Bill of Rights

SOURCE :

Freedom of Expression

16. (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of expression, which includes

(a) freedom of the press and other media;

(b) freedom to receive or impart information or ideas;

(c) freedom of artistic creativity; and

(d) academic freedom and freedom of scientific research.

(2) The right in subsection (1) does not extend to –

(a) propaganda for war

(b) incitement of imminent violence; or

(c) advocacy of hatred that is based on race, ethnicity, gender or religion, and that constitutes incitement to cause harm.

17. Everyone has the right, peacefully and unarmed, to assemble, to demonstrate, to picket and to present petitions.

Exercise in the motivation of answers:

  • What follows are three (3) statements on freedoms as described in Source C. You must prove or disprove the statements in the correct manner. Follow the instructions closely!

State your arguments as follows:Take in a standpoint = 1. (Be careful, “no” is not a standpoint or a statement!)Give a reason(s) why you agree with the statement or not = 1Find proof in the Act to prove your reason / point = 2 Total = 4

  1. In Section 16 (1) of Source C, your freedom of “artistic creativity” gives you the right to write anything on the walls of the boys’ toilets at school, e.g.

YOU FAGGOT

Tip: Test these statements against the conditions that are stated in 16 (2) a, b and c!

2. In Section 16 (1) (d) of Source C, the words “academic freedom” give you the right to copy your classmate’s work and to hand it in as your own work – if you have his permission to do so.

3. In Section 16 (1) (d) of Source C, the words “scientific research” give you the right to cause an unbearable stink in the school’s laboratory.

[LO 3.1, 3.2, 3.3]

Assessment

Table 1
Learning outcomes(LOs)
LO 1
Historical EnquiryThe learner will be able to use enquiry skills to investigate the past and present.
Assessment standards(ASs)
We know this when the learner:
1.1 continues to identify and select a variety of historical and archaeological sources relevant to an inquiry [finds sources];
1.2 evaluates the sources used (e.g. “Who created the source?”, “Is it reliable”, “How useful is the information?”) [works with sources];
1.3 interprets graphical and statistical sources [works with sources];
1.4 presents an original idea as part of an answer to questions posed [answers the question];
1.5 communicates knowledge and understanding by constructing own interpretation and argument based on the historical sources (including extended writing, artwork, graphics and drama); uses information technology where available and appropriate [communicates the answer].

Learning outcomes (LOs)

LO 2

Historical Knowledge and Understanding

The learner will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge and understanding.

Assessment standards(ASs)

We know this when the learner:

2.1 begins to make links between historical events and processes in different contexts in the same period [chronology and time];

2.2 recognises that causes and effects of effects vary in importance [cause and effect];

2.3 explains charges in a wider historical and environmental context [change and continuity].

LO 3

Historical Interpretation

The learner will be able to interpret aspects of history.

We know this when the learner:

3.1 examines historical interpretation by asking relevant questions about the author of an historical source [source interpretation];

3.2 identifies and gives reasons for the different ways that the past is represented and interpreted [source interpretation];

3.3 explains why history is not objective or neutral [source interpretation];

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

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Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

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