Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » History Grade 8 » Coparative study between the French and Industrial Revolutions

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

In these lenses

  • GETSenPhaseSS display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: Siyavula: Social Sciences (Gr. 7-9)
    By: Siyavula

    Collection Review Status: In Review

    Click the "GETSenPhaseSS" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Coparative study between the French and Industrial Revolutions

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

Social Sciences

HISTORY

Grade 8

LAND AND POWER

Module 7

Comparative study : Industrial Revolution vs French Revolution

DEFINITION:

The IR was a slow but radical change from manual labour to the use of machines.

The FR was a political revolution in which the working class ended the reign of the government, which was a monarchy, by means of a fast, bloody conflict.

CAUSES:

The inventions of creative leaders who improved technology to such an extent that capitalism came into being, i.e. the use of money in the production of goods and services so that even more money could be made.

The suppressive government by the minority group, the king and his aristocracy, which gave rise to the communistic dream of a worker’s paradise.

WRITINGS:

1776 “The Wealth of Nations” by Adam Smith, in which he encouraged private initiative, i.e. that maximum wealth and success could only be achieved by individuals because people want to promote their own prosperity and the nation could benefit from this.

Rousseau (1712 – 1778) wrote in his “Social Contract” that the power should rest in the people and not in the king. He composed the motto of the French Revolution: liberty, equality and fraternity.

CONSEQUENCES:

The IR led to urbanisation, because factories and mines were built close to the sources of energy. This led to unplanned cities to house the poor workers. The rich became richer and the poor became poorer.

Napoleon Bonaparte was appointed as head of the French army by the directorate of France in 1795 to end corruption. His armies were welcomed by the suppressed people everywhere as liberators and this led to the spread of the ideals of the FR. Nationalism (a fiery love for your country) arose in this manner.

  • Write two paragraphs in which you use your own words to explain what is meant by the following:
  • communism
  • capitalism

[LO 2.2, 2.4]

ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF THE FRENCH AND INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTIONS

Your teacher will now help you to determine the extent of your knowledge and understanding of the two revolutions, for example by means of

a written test.

Assessment

Table 1
Learning outcomes(LOs)
LO 1
Historical EnquiryThe learner will be able to use enquiry skills to investigate the past and present.
Assessment standards(ASs)
We know this when the learner:
1.1 continues to identify and select a variety of historical and archaeological sources relevant to an inquiry [finds sources];
1.2 evaluates the sources used (e.g. “Who created the source?”, “Is it reliable”, “How useful is the information?”) [works with sources];
1.3 interprets graphical and statistical sources [works with sources];
1.4 presents an original idea as part of an answer to questions posed [answers the question];
1.5 communicates knowledge and understanding by constructing own interpretation and argument based on the historical sources (including extended writing, artwork, graphics and drama); uses information technology where available and appropriate [communicates the answer].

Learning outcomes (LOs)

LO 2

Historical Knowledge and Understanding

The learner will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge and understanding.

Assessment standards(ASs)

We know this when the learner:

2.1 begins to make links between historical events and processes in different contexts in the same period [chronology and time];

2.2 recognises that causes and effects of effects vary in importance [cause and effect];

2.3 explains charges in a wider historical and environmental context [change and continuity].

LO 3

Historical Interpretation

The learner will be able to interpret aspects of history.

We know this when the learner:

3.1 examines historical interpretation by asking relevant questions about the author of an historical

source [source interpretation];

3.2 identifies and gives reasons for the different ways that the past is represented and interpreted [source interpretation];

3.3 explains why history is not objective or neutral [source interpretation];

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks