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The Berlin Airlift and blocade

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

Social Sciences

HISTORY

Grade 9

THE NUCLEAR AGE AND THE COLD WAR

Module 10

THE BERLIN AIRLIFT AND BLOCKADE

ACTIVITY 3:

To historically research the Cold War by means of chronology, cause and effect and similarity and differences: THE BERLIN AIRLIFT AND BLOCKADE

[LO 1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3]

  • Use sources A, B, C and D, which refer to the Berlin Blockade (1948-1949), and answer the questions that follow.

SOURCE A:

Comments by Dr Konrad Adenauer, first Chancellor of West Germany, on the Berlin Blockade

The Soviet Union tried to force the Western Powers to give in by blocking all access routes by land and water. By isolating Berlin in its own sphere, they tried to remove the Western Allies.

SOURCE B:

Comments by President Truman of the USA on the Berlin Blockade in 1949)

We refused to be forced out of Berlin. We showed the people of Europe that we will take action, take action together if our freedom is threatened. It brought the people of Europe closer to us. The Berlin Blockade was an attempt to test our capability and opposition.

SOURCE C:

Comments by General Lucius Clay, American Commander in Berlin, on the Berlin Blockade of June 1948

If Berlin should fall, West Germany would be next…If we withdraw from Berlin, Europe will be threatened . . . Communism will increase out of control

SOURCE D:

A Russian view of the airlift

The Soviet authorities were ready to provide food and fuel to the people of West Berlin, but the western occupying forces deprived the inhabitants of West Berlin of the possibility of East German aid. The USA organised a so-called airlift to provide West Berlin by air. This move served propaganda purposes and inevitably intensified the Cold War.

Use sources A, B, C and D, which refer to the Berlin Blockade (1948-1949), and answer the following questions.

1. Study sources A, B and D. Identify the position of each of the following leaders and explain what role each played during the Blockade from 1948 to 1949.

a) Dr Konrad Adenauer (Source A)

b) Harry S. Truman (Source B)

c) General Lucius Clay (Source C)

2. Use sources A, B, C, D to describe the chain of events during the Berlin Blockade from 1948 to1949.

3. Refer to source C. Explain General Clay’s view of the Blockade from 1948 to1949.

4. Study source D. How does source D

4.1 try to win sympathy for the Soviet cause?

4.2 promote dislike of the West?

Assessment

Learning outcomes (LOs)

LO 1

Historical investigation

The learner is able to use research skills to investigate both the present and the past.

Assessment standards (ASs)

We know this when the learner:

1.1 investigates a topic by asking key questions and identifies a variety of relevant sources to explore this topic [finding sources];

1.2 asks significant questions to evaluate the sources (e.g. to identify bias and stereotypes, omissions and gaps) [working with to sources];

1.3 analyses the information in sources [working with sources];

1.4 presents an independent line of argument in answering questions posed, and justifies (using evidence) the conclusions reached [answering the question];

1.5 communicates knowledge and understanding by constructing own interpretation and argument based on the historical sources; uses information technology where available and appropriate [communicating the answer].

LO 2

Knowledge and Understanding of History

The learner is able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of history.

We know this when the learner:

2.1 places events, people and changes in the periods of history studied within chronological framework [chronology and time];

2.2 identifies categories of cause and effect (e.g. immediate and long-term, direct and indirect) [cause and effect];

2.3 explains and analyses the reasons for and results of events in history [cause and effect];

2.4 recognises that change and development does not always mean progress [change and continuity].

LO 3

Interpretation of History

The learner is able to interpret aspects of history.

We know this when the learner:

3.1 understands the contested nature of content, and that historians construct histories when writing about events from the past [source interpretation];

3.2 constructs an interpretation based on sources, giving reasons for own interpretation [source interpretation];

3.3 analyses issues which influence the way history has been written [influences on interpretation];

3.4 explains the ways in which symbols are used to remember events and people from the past, and how oral histories can contribute to our understanding of the symbols [representation of the past].

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