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  • GETSenPhaseLang display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Siyavula: Languages (Gr. 7-9)
    By: SiyavulaAs a part of collection: "English Home Language Grade 9"

    Collection Review Status: In Review

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Coherent writing

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

Grade 9

A LOOK AT TELEVISION

Module 12

COHERENT WRITING

ACTIVITY 1:

To be able to choose information and synthesise contributions into a coherent piece of writing

[LO 5.3.2]

  • The following must be done in a group. Fill in the following chart :
Table 1
Soap Operas at the moment Airing Times Appealing to: Children Appealing to: Adults
       
       
       
       
       
  • Supply five reasons why “soapies” are not suitable for children.
  • Why is 17h30 – 18h30 a bad time for showing this type of programme?
  • Ask your parents to think how long ago each “soapy” started in South Africa and to tell you about some of them. Write down a point-form summary of what they say after consulting with your group. TIP: Come to some conclusions in your summary.

NOTE: A good summary has:

  • A clear, short heading
  • Clear sub-headings
  • Numbered points
  • Clarity and neatness

Decide on these BEFORE YOU START!

ACTIVITY 2:

To be able to show a range of interaction skills in a panel discussion tackling important issues

[LO 5.1. 4 , 2.4.1]

  • Have a panel discussion on any or all of the following topics:

Television announcers are too conscious of themselves.

Television programmes promote violence.

Children who do not watch television at all are more creative than those who do.

Television invades our privacy.

Watching television develops poor habits.

Television is essential for knowing what is going on in the world.

Abuses in the world have been exposed by television reporters / documentaries.

The dangers that follow the lives of television reporters / photographers.

What should take the place of television watching.

  • Use the following assessment chart to assist you in your preparation and presentation:
  • PREPARATION
Table 2
CRITERIA 1 2 3 4
Thoroughness Very little work done A bit of work done Worked well Extremely thorough
Interest Not interesting; clichéd Interesting only in part Quite interesting Very interesting
Audience contact Audience bored Audience slightly interested Audience quite interested Audience absorbed

PRESENTATION

Table 3
CRITERIA 1 2 3 4
Clarity Not clear at all Clear in part Quite clear Very clear
Use of body, face and hands Lacking in body language Glimpses of body language Body language contributes to message a bit Body language really adds to message
Use of notes No notes used and speaker stumbled along Notes used badly – speaker read from notes Speaker used notes for reference but read at times Speaker only referred to notes (Take the point; make the point)
  • Now prepare the contribution that you will make to the panel discussion. Work in a group with your leader. Decide on the questions that should be asked and who will answer what
  • aspect. However, you can also contribute to what the other panellists are saying. So, PREPARE WELL!

ACTIVITY 3:

To be able to choose information from various sources and individuals and synthesise contributions, with own ideas, into a coherent piece of work or presentation.

[LO 5.3.2]

  • As a group, draw up YOUR family tree and show the connections between members

They could be relatives by marriage or be stepbrothers/ stepsisters or just friends.

Use any kind of diagram you wish.

  • Do this on a large piece of paper so that your family history is clear.

Then tell the class about your family if you wish. DO YOUR FINAL PRODUCT ON A LARGER PIECE OF PAPER TO SHOW AND TELL.

ACTIVITY 4:

To be able to respond critically to text by evaluating writer’s point of view / question and weigh options

[LO 3.8.1, 5.2.3]

SOME READING TIPS:

Read the following passage TWICE:

  • first to see in general what it is about;
  • secondly to pick up the details.

THEN, read the QUESTIONS before you read the passage.

  • This will mean that you read with intent, see?

Did you understand what you read?

Circle words you did not understand and look up their meaning in a dictionary.

Ask a friend or an educator about some of the meanings.

Write the meaning in the margin of the passage for future reference.

Is that harmless half-hour on the box really so harmless?

GILLE WEINTROUB examines the dirty washing that lies beneath the soaps.

PARENTS in the United States threw up their hands in horror when kids took to city sewers in emul

ation of the TV cartoon heroes of the day, the Ninja Turtles. In South Africa, even the children's programme on Radio South Africa felt obliged to warn young listeners about the noxious gases they might encounter should they take it into their heads to go under the city . . .

So nobody underestimates the power of the box when it comes to turtles. But what would hap

pen to the already embattled morals of society if our teen

agers began living their lives like Loving or spent their days like the characters of Days of our Lives. Many households come to a standstill between 17h30 and 18h30 while entire families watch what many adults classify as escapist television nonsense. But is it really harmless?

Di van der Merwe banned Loving and Days of our Lives in her home because of its effect on her 14-year old daughter.

“Lindsey began basing her attitudes on the activities of these two-dimensional people. She began talking American; her priorities became mixed up.”

But it was romance rather than sex that put the final nail in the coffin, as far as Lindsay’s mother was concerned. “Her major priority became achieving a romantic relationship with a boy. That’s why I banned it outright. She’s 14, and at that age they’re too young for sex. It’s the romantic issue that clouds priorities. Her education, social life and friends should be her priorities at this age, but Loving, Egoli, TheBold and the Beautiful as well as Generations tell her how desirable it is to have a romantic relationship with a member of the opposite sex.

Timing was also a problem.

Right at prime time in family life, she would be sitting “staring at the screen," complained Van der Merwe. “Lindsey did nothing until after 7 pm.”

Sex-educationist, RENÉ RAFF, is terribly against programmes like Egoli, Loving, Days of our Lives and all other soap operas because they glamorise deviant and promiscuous behaviour. But she does, albeit grudgingly, allow her children to watch Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles because its “goody vs baddy" moral formula takes the edge off the violence it portrays. “The soaps,” says Raff, “exposes children unnecessarily to issues which are not children’s issues. Children do not have the emotional sophistication to judge wrong from right. Adolescents may have better judgmental abilities, but they too are exposed to things in an unrealistic way.”

The sexual and romantic convolutions of Loving and other soapies like The Bold and the Beautiful bear little relationship to reality. Loving characters, Jim Vochek (former Catholic priest, who lost his memory after an accident, came to, remembered he had been in love 15 years before and gave up the priesthood to marry his former lover!), and Shana Alden (love-child of Alden dynasty head, left at the altar by her first lover who decided to go back to his wife, became engaged to his brother, then dumped him at the altar when Father Jim, about to be plain Jim, persuaded her to marry him instead!). It is made to look glamorous to cheat, deceive and tell lies like the teenage character, Sammy of Days of our Lives.

Soap operas portray sexual activities without mentioning consequences like pregnancy or the risk of Aids or any other sexually transmitted disease.”

1. Supply the dictionary meaning of the following words: and then use each word in a sentence to show its meaning.

  • Unrealistic:
  • Priority:
  • Glamorise:
  • Noxious:

2. Why did Lindsey’s mother ban her from watching ‘soapies’?

3. In Line 3, the word “children’s” has an apostrophe to indicate that the [television] programme is one made for children.

What is the purpose of the apostrophe in: “Lindsay’s mother . . . ”? (par.5)

4. Lindsay’s mother states, That’s why I banned it outright. She’s 14 and at that age they’re too young for sex.”

The underlined words are examples of contractions and also make use of the apostrophe.

Here, the apostrophe takes the place of letters that were left out.

TIP: Contractions are only allowed in writing when they represent spoken words.

Rewrite the above sentence, filling in the missing letters so that the words are complete.

That’s =

She’s =

They’re =

6. According to the article, why are ‘soapies’ not suitable for children?

7. Why does René Raff begrudgingly let her children watch Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles?

8. Quote the priorities Di van der Merwe says her daughter should have at fourteen years old.

9. Draw up a 5-point list of priorities for yourself, other than watching television!

10. Underline the correct spelling of the following word:

The teacher was decieved \ deceived \ desieved.

There is nothing glamorous about violense \ violinse \ violence.

The consequences \ consequinces \ consekwences were dramatic.

ACTIVITY 5:

To be able to explore the creative use of language in a letter

[LO 4.1.2]

  • Finally, write a letter to the press about any aspect of television that worries you or where you feel standards are lacking or about programming, the type of film being shown or the number of repeats. You can, of course, also praise the news reporting, the programming or any aspect that you feel deserves praise.
  • Use the following chart to assess your work before you hand it to your teacher.

CRITERIA

1

2

3

4

Subject line

Not relevant to the content. It is also not captivating.

Unclear or too long. It is relevant but slightly off the point.

Almost clear what the letter is about but errors in style.

Short and creative. It tells us exactly what this letter is about.

Content

Not relevant. Confusing. Not thorough.

Point or issue not made or raised immediately.

Mostly to the point.

Creative and to the point.

Conclusion

The conclusion starts a new point and has no connection with the content.

Conclusion connects with the content, but does so by repeating words.

Conclusion almost achieves its purpose.

Sums up points made without using the same words.

Please remember that it is unkind and ill-mannered to threaten, swear or be rude to the person you are writing to.

Be polite and state your issue firmly, tactfully and cleverly.

Make sure your letter makes an impact on readers.

Read through your work and rectify your spelling errors.

Check for incorrect use of punctuation marks or punctuation marks left out.

Make sure that each new point or idea forms a new paragraph.

Make sure there is a line left open between each unit.

ROUGH DRAFT:

  • Address and date
  • The Editor and business address
  • Subject line
  • Opening paragraph
  • Points to raise
  • Closing paragraph
  • Close

Assessment

Learning Outcomes(LOs)

LO 2

SPEAKING

The learner will be able to communicate confidently and effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.

Assessment Standards(ASs)

We know this when the learner:

2.4 demonstrates a range of complex interaction skills by participating actively in group discussions, conversations, debates, group interviews and surveys, and while so doing:

2.4.1 tackles important issues (e.g. social and ethical issues related to the environment and human rights);

2.5 gives oral presentations confidently and creatively paying attention to:

2.5.1 pausing and variation in tempo and volume at key points;

2.5.2 purpose and audience;

2.5.3 posture, gesture, body language and facial expressions to engage audience interest;

2.5.4 variation in presentation modes;

2.5.5 register;

2.5.6 tone;

2.5.7 degree of formality

2.5.8 different social and cultural conventions;

2.5.9 appropriate figurative devices such as climax, anti-climax, hyperbole and rhetorical questions.

LO 3

READING AND VIEWING

The learner will be able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.

We know this when the learner:

3.8 responds critically to texts:

3.8.1 evaluates writer’s point of view.

LO 4

WRITING

The learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.

We know this when the learner:

4.1 writes a wide range of imaginative texts:

4.1.2 to explore the creative, critical and playful use of language by means of narrative and descriptive compositions, dialogues, poems, songs, elementary short stories, letters, drama with accompanying sound and visual effects;

4.4 uses the writing process independently and with ease to generate complex texts:

4.4.1 selects and explores complex topics through brainstorming, and using lists and notes.

LO 5

THINKING AND REASONING

The learner will be able to use language to think and reason, as well as to access, process and use information for learning.

We know this when the learner:

5.1 uses language to think and reason:

5.1.4 develops and uses arguments in ways that;

make the logic clear to the reader or listener;

anticipates responses and objections;

5.1.6 uses factual information and interprets statistics with increasing confidence to support an argument;

5.1.7 draws on own experience and contrasts it with that of others to illustrate a point of view;

5.2 uses language to investigate and explore:

5.2.3 questions and weighs options;

5.2.4 explores a variety of approaches to plan, organise, and present research on a topic;

5.2.5 considers different perspectives when selecting information.

5.3 processes information:

5.3.2 chooses best and most appropriate information from various sources and individuals, and synthesises contributions with own ideas into a coherent piece of work or presentation;

5.5 uses language to reflect:

5.5.2 reviews own critical reading, writing and listening skills, habits and experiences, and notes strengths and areas for development.

Memorandum

ACTIVITY 1

Chooses information and synthesises contributions into a coherent piece of writing

LO 5.3.2 Marking: Ed

  • ‘Soapies’ play an enormous role in the literate life of learners and cannot be ignored. So pay attention to this exercise and their findings. Allow THEM to come to the conclusions you would like to lead them to! Make sure that they manage to encapsulate the information they glean from the group and that their findings are coherent.

ACTIVITY 2

Shows a range of interaction skills in a panel discussion tackling important issues

  • First explain that every member of the panel discussion should have something to say; that the topic should be explored as widely as possible. Then go over ways of interrupting politely; ways of changing the subject and introducing another angle to the topic and ways of preventing a one-to-one conversation happening in the panel and also ways of not stultifying the conversation when the leader asks each person in turn for their view, which can be rather boring to the viewers because of its predictability. The speakers should feel safe enough to talk on their own without prompting.
  • Explain again that the preparation eases the presentation. Look for good content; fair comment and good ways of communicating views.
  • Then also, go over with the peers exactly how they should mark. Ask them to comment at the end.

ACTIVITY 3

Chooses information from various sources and individuals and synthesises contributions with own ideas into a coherent piece of work or presentation

  • Doing an oral history is already a mammoth task. Let them work out the questions that they would like to ask their family members. Then let them compare their questions with those of their friends. Come to a final decision about the questions to ask.
  • Make sure that they manage to encapsulate the information they glean from the group and that their findings are coherent.
  • Make sure that they know they will be marked according to their preparation, what their product looks like and then on their presentation.
  • If this is done well, one can have a family tree exhibition in the hall or library to encourage other learners to find their family history before it is too late and the information is lost for ever!

ACTIVITY 4

Responds critically to text by evaluating writer’s point of view / Questions and weighs options

  • The writer of this article has strong views. See how far they agree with her and perhaps they can also look for other ways that TV effects us. They need to look at the article critically.
  • ACTIVITY 5
  • To explore the creative use of language in a letter
  • A letter to the press can be so effective. Learners need to understand that there are issues that should be handled in the press and there are others that shouldn’t and they should know the difference.
  • Go over the notes with them before they start writing and perhaps let them bring a good letter to class so that you can study what makes good writing and what not.

Whenever learners hand in work, they must also hand in the rough work, planning work and preparation work.

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