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To listen for specific information

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

Grade 9

GROUP WORK AND MUSIC

Module 9

TO LISTEN FOR SPECIFIC INFORMATION

ACTIVITY 1:

To be able to listen for specific information

[LO 1.3.1]

Listen carefully while your educator reads a story to you.

  • She will read the story twice.
  • Pick up the main themes on the first reading; the details on the second.

Now see how many questions you can answer from just listening:

  • In what grade was Joel?
  • What stimulated his interest in musical instruments?
  • What is the meaning of ‘vibrate’?
  • What instrument did his father play?
  • How is a high-pitched sound made in a piano?

What did he intend doing with his new knowledge about instruments and sound?

Explain the use of the commas in,

“ music-producing items include guitars, tambourines, bottles and glasses . .

Change the following into the past tense:

  • try
  • enjoy
  • go
  • see
  • bring
  • find
  • make
  • drink
  • speak
  • know

Why is there an apostrophe in “father’s guitar”?

The title “Sounds all Around” uses a poetic device. Give it its real name and explain it in the title.

ACTIVITY 2:

To be able to understand poetic elements: sounds and rhythm

[LO 3.2]

Reading rhythm and musical rhythm are very similar. We seem to remember words that form a rhythmic pattern quite easily, e.g. the repetition of ‘m’ and the assonance is attractive in . . .

  • Mickey Mouse rocks the house Say this a few times.

Now, as a group, write 6 – 10 lines of poetry that rhyme and make use of repetition.

e.g. The fox hid in the box, hid in the boxin a flurry; in a hurry, hurry, hurryThe goose, the moose, the goosy moosethe kangaroo and you, you, yousat on the mat, sat on the mat to wait for his mate, who came too late!

Now, as a group, rap your poem to the class.

  • You will need to do some rehearsing, so look at the next check list to see what you should do.
Table 1
Rhythm ……….
Clarity ………
Liveliness ………
Team work ………

ACTIVITY 3:

To demonstrate ability to write creatively: the haiku and quartet

[LO 4.4.2]

  • A Haiku is a poem consisting of THREE lines:
  • Line 1: Words totalling 5 syllables
  • Line 2: Words totalling 7 syllables
  • Line 3: Words totalling 5 syllables

e.g. The sea feels the pullOf the wind and the currentAnd moves to the beach.

A quartet is a poem of four lines, rhyming ABAB or ABBA, usually in iambic pentameter:

This means a poem looking something like this, with the rhyme as follows:

Rhythm is: light-strong/ light-strong / light-strong / light strong / light-strong (5) syllables.

e.g. The sea / comes in / to play / today / for fun

  • So a quartet looks like this:

The sea / comes in / to play / today / for fun

The girls / and boys / arrive / and laugh / and run

The dogs / and cats / all seem / to un/ derstand

That play/ and sand / and sun / is real/ ly grand.

Now YOU try:

My Haiku

Rough work:________

Final product:_______

My Quartet_______

Rough work:______

Final product:______

ACTIVITY 4:

To be able to read for information and write to communicate information

[LO 3.4.1, 4.1.3, 5.3.1]

In your group, do some research on a music group or music artist.

1. Choose an artist or group

2. THREE sources of reference in your bibliography.

Rough notes:

  • Where you found the information and pictures;
  • The name of the magazine or book or encyclopaedia;
  • The date it was published;
  • The author of the article or book.

Rough bibliography: (as above)

Include a content page for your fact file to help you plan.

e.g. His / their childhood and background

  • Beginnings
  • Some lyrics analysed
  • World tours
  • Experience / training
  • Moral standing (NB to look at this and assess)
  • Strange or distinctive facts about the group
  • YOUR view

Rough notes:

4. Include drawings or illustrations (but must not outweigh the content) with captions.(Do these on your own paper).

5. Hand in a pre-determined progress report with dates:

Date for starting project

Date for completing fact-finding

Date for completing illustrations

Date for completing bibliography

Date for handing in

Rough work evaluation

Final product:

Bibliography:

5/6 different aspects of the artist or group: Give the separate headings:

ACTIVITY 5:

To be able to use interviewing techniques

[LO 2.5.2]

Choose one of the following ways of interviewing or any other choice of your own:

Panel discussion / Radio interview (without phone-ins) / Oprah Winfrey-type interview

First prepare your questions:

Rough notes on the types of questions to ask:

TIPS:

  • Leave a space between the questions.
  • Underline the operative words in each question for easy reference.

Now do the actual interview:

ACTIVITY 6:

To be able to write positive and negative reviews

[LO 4.6.1, 4.6.3]

Your group has performed in a large venue for thousands of fans.

Write two reviews: One praising the concert; one slating it.

Use the following to check whether you have covered every aspect of the concert:

Table 2
CRITERIA PositiveTick NegativeTick
Who, what, where, when    
Audience response    
Backstage support    
Costumes    
Lighting    
Sound effects    
Dancing    
Stage personality    
Musicality    
Backing    
Highlight / low point    
Recommendation(s)    

Extra notes to assist you

Please look at the following note on editing: they will help you:

Editing (the post-writing phase) is very important.

It has three main functions:

1. To correct grammatical mistakes

  • Sentence construction
  • Use of tenses
  • Spelling
  • Punctuation
  • Concord

2. To find out if you followed the instructions

  • Have you done what was asked?
  • Have you included extra creative requirements?

3. To correct the writing structure

  • A proper introduction
  • Body covering topic fully
  • Close, framing the work

Editing becomes second nature after a while.

Now that you have done all the activities in this module, re-draw the graph you completed at the start of this module.

The difference between your two lines is what you have learnt! Well done!

For fun, here is space for you to write the words of your own song. If you are satisfied, ask a friend who can write music to put your words to music. You never know – you could be famous one day!

Assessment

Table 3
Learning Outcomes(LOs)
 
LO 1
ListeningThe learner is able to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically in a wider range of situations.
Assessment Standards(ASs)
 
We know this when the learner:
1.3 listens for specific information:
1.3.1 takes own simple notes;
1.3.2 uses information to complete a table or chart, or label a diagram.
LO 2
SpeakingThe learner will be able to communicate effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.
We know this when the learner:
2.1 translates and interprets:
2.1.2 translates or interprets messages;
2.2 interacts in additional language:
2.2.1 uses language for a range of functions;
2.4 debates social and ethical issues by arguing persuasively and responding critically:
2.4.4 expresses opinions and supports them with reasons;
2.5 is interviewed by someone:
2.5.1 anticipates the questions that will be asked and prepares for them;
2.5.2 answers questions.
LO 3
Reading and ViewingThe learner will be able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.
We know this when the learner:
3.1 reads a text:
3.1.1 identifies purpose, audience and context;
3.2 understands some elements of poetry and of the terms used to describe this language:
3.4 reads for information:
3.4.1 reads information texts;
3.4.2 reads diagrams, graphs and charts of increasing complexity;
3.4.4 summarises information.
LO 4
WritingThe learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.
We know this when the learner:
4.1 writes to communicate information:
4.1.1 writes longer texts of several paragraphs, describing processes and procedures, giving explanations, advantages, disadvantages, arguing for and against;
4.1.3 does a survey and writes it up (e.g. as a report);
4.4 writes creatively:
4.4.2 shows development in the ability to write stories, poems and play-scripts (e.g. by working with design);
4.6 treats writing as a process:
4.6.1 drafts, reads and discusses own writing critically;
4.6.3 uses knowledge of grammar, spelling, etc., to edit.

Memorandum

ACTIVITY 1

Read the story “Sounds All Around” twice, fairly slowly with expression and then give them a chance to see how many questions they can answer. For marks. Let them know.

Sounds All Around

15Joel, now in Grade 8, always tried to find out what sounds he could make with different objects and different musical instruments. One day he found a thin elastic band. He did not think much about it. He had seen and held a million elastic bands before.

This time though, Joel began playing with the elastic band and found out something he never knew: When he stretched the elastic band with both hands and touched it with one thumb, it vibrated and made an interesting sound. Joel was amazed.

“Wow Dad, did you hear that? I’m going to show Mom!”

20His mother said: “You made that elastic band vibrate which means to move back and forth at a fast pace. In fact, that is how we hear sounds.”

Joel was intrigued. So he asked his dad if he could take out his dad’s guitar.

2530Joel touched the guitar strings and loved the sound that they made. Then Joel went over to the piano and pressed two of the keys. This sound was different from the sound made by the elastic band and his father’s guitar. Joel wondered how the piano sound was made.

He asked his mother, “Mom, how does the piano make its sound and make so many different sounds?”

His mother told him to open the top of the piano and to look inside. Then when he pressed a key, he realized something was vibrating! He pressed another key and saw a long string vibrate. Joel spoke excitedly: “The string’s vibration makes the sound.”

He asked his mom why he could only see the long strings vibrate? His mother explained that a piano has long strings and short strings. The long strings vibrate slowly and they make low sounds; the short strings vibrate fast and make higher-pitched sounds.

3540Suddenly his father walked into the room with five glasses of water - and a xylophone. The glasses were filled to different levels. As his father touched the rims of the glasses they all made a different sound. Joel could hardly believe his ears. Then his father touched the short and long end of the xylophone with the xylophone stick. His father explained that the length of the stick dictated the sound, because it vibrated differently;, making a long or short sound.

45Joel looked around the room for more sounds and was surprised to find so many.

Joel intended having more fun that day as he looked for more musical objects and tried to discover how they made their sound.

Pretty soon he would try to use all these objects around him to make music. He realized that one could make music without spending a fortune. Perhaps he would start a small band!

ACTIVITY 2

First let them write something but give them time to think, imagine, plan and create. Then give them a chance to dramatise what they have written. Simple costumes can of course be worn.

ACTIVITY 3

Writing a haiku and quartet can be so satisfying because it is actually so simple. Draw a tree with empty branches in your classroom. Call it the poet-tree and hang their poems on the branches or write the poem on a paper leaf and place them on the bare branches. Can be very pleasing to have one’s poem read in public.

ACTIVITY 4

This is again a project and should be done thoroughly – so they need to understand their parameters and also the full detail of the assignment. Go through exactly what it is they should research and exactly how they should present it.

Tip: Rough work must always be handed in too!

ACTIVITY 5

A panel discussion etc needs preparation. This they need to understand. This will help lessen nervousness.

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