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Formal letter

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

Grade 9

HIDDEN TREASURES

Module 13

FORMAL LETTER

ACTIVITY 1:

To write for social purposes

[LO 4.2, 4.6]

How wonderful it would be to get permission for your class to plant a tree in the school grounds, one which you would then be responsible to nurture (look after)!

Write a formal letter of ± 100 wordsto your headmaster requesting permission to do just that!

  • Your teacher will select the best letter to be submitted to him. I hope it will be yours. Remember to do a rough draft first, to edit it and then to hand in the final draft.

Take note of the correct format:

Ainsville

7150

25 May 2003

The Headmaster

Ainsville High School

PO Box 438

Ainsville

7150

Dear Mr Graham

Tree Planting

(Introduction: your purpose for writing)

(Body: reasons and support for your letter)

(Conclusion: a positive ending)

Yours faithfully

(Ms) S. Petersen

Consult the functional writing grid by which your diary entry was assessed – it will apply here too.

Proof read and edit your rough draft now. (Hand in the rough draft with the final copy.)

By now you have probably received permission to plant a tree. As a class, make a list of all that needs to be done to plant and to maintain a tree. Consider the following points:

  • how deep and wide the hole must be
  • what fertiliser is needed
  • how often the tree needs to be watered
  • choice of tree (perhaps you can find out what the tree of the year is and plant it if it is suited to your area), consider whether the area is sunny or shaded and whether the tree is evergreen or not
  • the best season in which to plant the tree

will have to devise a roster. The duties of planting and caring for your tree should be divided amongst all your classmates. This will ensure that it receives the best care in order for it to grow into a big, strong, healthy specimen. A tree is a good reminder of the passing of time.

(Include clearing litter from the area around your tree as a duty.)

Table 1
DATE NAME DUTY
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • Where do you plot your X’s now?

ACTIVITY 2:

To read a text for information and pleasure and understand some elements of poetry

[LO 3.2, 6.3, 6.9]

It is exactly this (as depicted by the graph) - the pursuit of money - that causes us to lose sight of that which is more essential than money: a faith in the quality of life. Discuss this briefly in your group.

  • Consider the following poem before deciding whether man is destructive or not.
  • Answer the questions that follow with care.

Where are all my Christmas trees?

…April, May, June, July

August, September, October, November –

December!

Nine long months still to dream of

silver balls and tinsel,

little lambs and the magi

bringing to life the miracle of the nativity.

Was it so long ago that we

swept up the pine needles?

The whispering pines is where I’ll go

to breathe in the Christmas feel,

to roll on matted needle covers

and rest, staring where they point –

where infinite dreams and hopes are sent.

A grating, rasping, sawing fills my ears

and round the bend –

a massacre.

They’re gone and going . . .

My stream of tears

splatters off the fallen board

‘Phase One: Whispering Pines, exclusive

housing estate: R1 800 000 inclusive’ —

exclusive of thin threads of

tinsel

festooning more than life.

. . . April, May, June, July

August, September, October, November –

December:

Tinsel on Tuscan chimneys?

(Anon)

1.

1.1 What exactly is it that upsets the poet? (2)

1.2 Where did the writer go when she longed for Christmas-time and a Christmas feeling? (2)

1.3 The poet considers the destruction of the pine trees as a bloody slaughter. Quote the word that indicates this. (1)

1.4 Explain the last line of the poem. (2)

  • Plot your X on Treasure Island map.

2. Figures of Speech

2.1 Match the columns by ruling a line from the letter to the matching number.

Table 2
a) ‘A grating, rasping, sawing fills my ears…’ i) Onomatopoeia
b) ‘My stream of tears…’ ii) Alliteration
c) ‘…splatters…’ iii) Personification
d) ‘…whispering pines…’ iv) Metaphor

(4)

2.2 Now give a definition for each of the above figures of speech and give another example from nature of each.

i) Definition:

Example: (2)

ii) Definition:

Example:(2)

iii) Definition:

Example: (2)

iv) Definition:

Example: (2)

X marks which spot?

3. Dictionary Work

  • Look at the dictionary entries below and then answer the questions that follow.

3.1

Tus´ can. 1. adj. Of Tuscany. 2. n. A ~ person; Italian as spoken by ~s. [L]

3.2

tin´ sel, n. Decorations of bright metal foil or threads, tawdry brilliance, mere glitter, flashiness ; (attrib.) flashy, of more apparent than real worth. ~ led (-ld) a. [F estincelle f. L scintilla spark ; cf. STENCIL]

3.3

Ma´ gi n. pl., priests of ancient Persia, the wise men from the east (Math. 1); Ma´ gian, (adj.) of the Magi, (n.) one of them. [L f. Gk]

a) Write down the part of speech of each word as it is used in the poem. (3)

b) Write down from which language each word originates.

Tuscan:

Tinsel:

Magi: (3)

Mark your spot on the map with X.

Plot another X on your Treasure Island map.

ACTIVITY 3:

To write creatively and take part in role-play

[LO 4.3, 2,2]

Have you ever heard of a Dodo?

You may have heard of this bird (the Dodo) but you will never see a live one. Man has caused its extinction!

You see we must look after our earth to ensure the continuation of our precious animal kingdom.

In a play dialogue of ± 100 words describe to your friend another extinct animal or bird.(You will have to do some research.)

Remember to do a rough draft and to show proof of editing before writing your final draft.

Once done plot your X!

Check the functional writing rubric before you start!

Table 3
  1 2 3
Animal None Some attempt but not convincing Excellent portrayal
Dialogue Boring exchanges, not all relevant Some attempt at originality Original, creative, convincing
Clarity Unclear, mumbled Inconsistent Clear, good projection

(15)

Now you and a partner can produce this dialogue as a role-play to the class – have fun! (You can also perhaps demonstrate the actions of the animal or make the sound it made.)

Assessment

Table 4
Learning Outcomes(LOs)
 
LO 1
ListeningThe learner is able to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically in a wider range of situations.
Assessment Standards(ASs)
 
We know this when the learner:
1.1 understands and appreciates stories, in­cluding those told by other learners;
1.4 listens actively in discussion.
LO 2
SpeakingThe learner will be able to communicate effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.
We know this when the learner:
2.2 interacts in additional language;
2.4 debates social and ethical issues by arguing persuasively and responding critically;
2.6 gives a short formal talk or presentation.
LO 3
Reading and ViewingThe learner will be able to read and view for informa­tion and enjoyment, and respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.
We know this when the learner:
3.1 reads a text (fiction or non-fiction):3.2 understands some elements of poetry and of the terms used to describe this language;3.3 reads and responds to social texts;3.4 reads for information.
LO 4
WritingThe learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.
We know this when the learner:
4.2 writes for social purposes;
4.4 writes creatively;
4.3 writes for personal reflection;
4.6 treats writing as a process.
LO 5
Thinking and ReasoningThe learner will be able to use language to think and reason, as well as to access, process and use information for learning.
We know this when the learner:
5.1 uses language and literacy across the curriculum;5.2 uses language for thinking:5.2.5 draws ;5.3 collects and records information in different ways.
LO 6
Language Structure and UseThe learner will know and be able to use the sounds, words and grammar of the language to create and interpret text.
We know this when the learner:
6.2 understands and uses the past perfect progressive tense;
6.3 understands and uses direct and indirect speech;
6.8 uses some language to talk about language (meta-language – terms such as paragraph);
6.9 expands vocabulary (e.g. uses prefixes to form new words: autobank, autobiography, automatic).

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