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  • GETIntPhaseSS display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Siyavula: Social Sciences (Gr. 4-6)
    By: SiyavulaAs a part of collection: "Social Sciences: History Grade 5"

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SOCIAL SCIENCES: HISTORY

Grade 5

THE STORY OF YOUR PROVINCE

Module 3

THE PAST OF YOUR PROVINCE: MAPS

HOW MAPS CAN HELP YOU TO HAVE A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE PAST OF YOUR PROVINCE

ACTIVITY 1:

HOW TO USE A MAP

[LO 1.2]

(a) One day you come across this map of the South Western Cape in a museum. The curator later asks you to help add the following five pieces of information to the map:

SELECT THE APPROPRIATE SKETCH AND DRAW IT ON THE MAP IN THE APPROPRIATE FRAME.

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

(b) Which events probably took place if the following objects were found during excavations in a cave near Saldanha Bay?

Scrapers, Pots, Wooden implements, Bone-points, Stones with holes

(c) Aha, the dining utensils!

Make a list with five instructions how you would eat with your stone cutlery...

FARMERS OF THE IRON-AGE

The following maps indicate the extent to which Iron-age farmers entered South Africa by A.D. 200 (approximately the same time as the Khoina). They were mainly farmers and already used iron tools. They preferred the eastern parts of the country because the c _________was favourable for crops and the ________l was fertile. Black agriculturalists mostly farmed with sheep and goats, and ploughed the land. On the side they hunted and gathered. Farming was hard work. They therefore trekked around less and settled in particular areas. Bushy areas were cleaned for agriculture. By A.D. 1000 early farmers started giving more attention to cattle farming and started to trek in search of grazing. This became more important than agriculture.

(d) Use the following maps, table and articles to answer the questions:

metal tools

stock farming

black languages

agriculture

SOURCE 1

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)

SOURCE 2

Figure 3
Figure 3 (graphics3.png)

IRON-AGE FARMERS ENTER

THE COUNTRY

by 150 A.D. farmers lived on the highlands of Zimbabwe

200 A.D. farmers lived along the coast of Mozambique

250 A.D. farmers lived at Mzonjani in Natal

600 A.D. farmers lived in the wide river valleys of Natal

650 A.D. farmers lived in the southern part of the Transkei

SOURCE 3

Figure 4
Figure 4 (graphics4.png)

SOURCE 4

The black farmers were well organized. Each group usually included a number of families and relatives. They had to look after their own members, as well as the elderly and the sick. Part of the harvest always had to be stored for times of need like droughts. Normally the oldest man was regarded as the head of the family.

Refugees, supporters, other relatives and strangers were also invited to join the group. The men usually had to look after the cattle, while the women worked in the fields. In areas more suitable for agriculture the men also had to work in the fields, seeing that it was their greatest source of income. Women however, were allowed to tend to small livestock, like goats and poultry.

QUIZ!

Where were the building materials for the houses found?

Which materials were used for tools?

Why are there so many ash-heaps in this village?

How did these farmers forge iron?

Figure 5
Figure 5 (graphics5.png)

Assessment

LO 1

HISTORICAL ENQUIRYThe learner will be to use enquiry skills to investigate the past and present.

We know this when the learner:

1.1 finds sources:

with guidance, selects sources useful for finding information on the past (e.g. oral, written and visual sources, including maps, graphs and tables, objects, buildings, monuments, museums);

1.2 works with sources:

records and categorises information from a variety of sources (e.g. oral, written and visual sources, including maps, graphs and tables, objects, buildings, monuments, museums);

1.3 answers the question:

  • continues to use information from sources to answer questions about people, events, objects, and places in the past.

Memorandum

ACTIVITY

a) 1) Diaz 4) Stone Age implements

2) Sharp-pointed pots 5) Hollowed out stone

  1. 1) Rock engravings

b)

  • They were mostly agriculturists – kept cattle and tilled the soil. New foodstuffs were introduced. Wood was worked into domestic utensils (milk pails, dishes, pounding-blocks, spoons, pipes).c) Iron ore was melted down for weapons and agricultural implements (e.g. weed-hoes). Soft metal was used for ornaments (bangles).
  • Different languages: Nguni – (e.g. Zulu, Sotho, Swazi, Nedeble) and Xhosa (e.g. Sotho, Tswana, Venda) developed.
  • Pottery contributed to the fact that pots were made for cooking and storage purposes.
  • More and more settlements were built of stone. People began to live in larger groups and started to lead a more established way of life.

Quiz

First the iron-ore was melted at a high temperature in a blast furnace to separate the iron from the impurities of the rock. Large quantities of charcoal is used to keep the furnaces at the right temperature. After the melting process the iron, that now resembles a lumpy cake, is heated again. Then it is forged into utensils by beating and cutting it. Ash heaps are often found nearby.

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

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What are tags? tag icon

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