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Vocabulary

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

Grade 5

FABULOUS

Module 6

VOCABULARY

  1. Do you know what the following are used for? Write down your answers on a sheet of paper or in your workbook. Reply in writing, as above.

(a) face-cloth

(b) face-cream

(c) face-powder

(d) face-pack

(e) face-lift

2. What does it mean to…

(a) save face?

(b) be face to face with someone?

(c) put on a brave face?

[LO 3.6]

Fight! Fight!(Adapted)

1. These paragraphs are not in the correct order.

2. Cut them out and paste them down on a folio page in a logical order.

3. Work with a partner and compare your order with that of another group.

A. “You again, Wood?” the teacher shouted, enraged. “I’ve just about had enough of you today. Get to the Headmaster immediately!”

B. Rihaan was bent double, coughing and spluttering.

C. “Please, sir, he started it, sir”, he said, pointing at Rihaan. “He just came up and hit me for nothing.”

D. “Stop it!” thundered a voice in Brad’s ear. Mr. Singh had hurried late from the staffroom to do his playground duty.

E. A punch to Rihaan’s mouth signalled the beginning of the end of it. One of Brad’s punches was blocked by Rihaan. He aimed a blow at the top of Brad’s head. The first glanced off his forearm and almost the full force of the punch went on to sink into Rihaan’s throat, full on his Adam’s apple.

F. Brad stared at him with angry eyes.

G. He turned to Brad whose name he could not remember. “And you, boy. Get up there and tell the Headmaster why I sent you. For fighting,” he reminded them unnecessarily. “Go on!”

H. No fighter can go on without wind, and nothing stops breathing quicker than a chop to the throat. Within two seconds, Rihaan was reduced to an open target. Brad took a step back, pulled back his right arm, and took aim at Rihaan’s nose. There was a sudden silence from the crowd. This was the climax. Everyone was waiting.

I. Rihaan, his eyes red and bulging, managed to draw a couple of shaky, sobbing breaths.

You will realise that many answers sound correct and make sense, even though they differ from group to group!

[LO 2.1.6; 3.1.3; 5.3.5]

LET’S TALK … ABOUT PUNISHMENT

What types of punishment are you given at home and at school?

What types of punishment are the most effective?

What punishment would you give for …

Table 1
…fighting, … stealing? …vandalism? …disobedience?
…smoking? …swearing? …cheating? …lying?

[LO 1.6; 1.7; 2.1.5; 2.1.6; 2.2.1; 2.4.3]

Let’s talk about . . . handlingCONFLICT

  • OK – so instead of beating each other up, they could have solved the problem by . . .
  • So what did you do instead? I mean, Rhiaan and Brad are obviously very angry with each other!
  • What could have been so bad to have caused Rihaan and Brad to get violent?
  • Yes, but one doesn’t have to fight like that. Hitting and punching doesn’t make you a hero.
  • I don’t like fighting. I think it is . . .
  • Hmm, and what do you prove by fighting? You end up . . .
  • How could I, as an onlooker, have helped to diffuse the situation?

Separate into groups and discuss the statements and queries.

Jot your answers down on a sheet of newsprint.

After the allotted time, present your findings to your peers.

[LO 2.1.6; 2.2.2; 2.2.4]

FAMILIES . . . (adapted from an unknown source)

Discuss: The following words should not be new or strange to you.

Parents: mother, father, mom, dad, husband, wife, single parent

Siblings: brother, sister, step-brother, step-sister, twins, triplets, quads

Your guardian: godmother, godfather

Relatives: uncle, aunt, nieces, nephews, cousin/s

Extended family: step-mother, step-father, step-brother, step-sister

Grandparents: granny, grandpa, grandmother, grandfather

1. Andrea’s family

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)
Table 2
STATEMENTS ANSWERS  
(a) Granny is sitting next to __ .    
(b) Grant has a little sister called __ .    
(c) __ and __ are twins.    
(d) Chris and Tracey are ___ and ___ .    
(e) Andrea has two sisters and a brother. T F  
(f) Grant is Alexander’s twin brother. T F  
(g) Chris is Andrea’s uncle. T F  
(h) Chris is married to Andrea’s mom. T F  
(i) Tracey is Andrea’s aunt. T F  
(j) Grant and Alexander are the same age. T F  
       

2. Complete the following text:

Andrea’s (a) is called Tracey. Her (b) are called Alexander and Grant. Their father has a (c) called Tracey. Tracey’s (d) is called Chris. The oldest person in the photograph is their …. (e).

Answers:

  1. (a) ___________________
  2. (b) ___________________
  3. (c) _____________________
  4. (d) ___________________
  5. (e) ___________________

3. Look at the photograph of Andrea’s neighbours. Describe them to your partner. Use words from the grid at the top of the previous page and give the family members names.

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)

[LO 5.2.1; 5.3.5]

Assessment

LO 1

LISTENINGThe learner will be able to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically in a wide range of situations.

We know this when the learner:

1.2 identifies the main message and themes in oral texts and relates them to everyday life;

1.3 identifies features of oral texts (structure, language, tone, register, etc.) that make them appropriate for different purposes and audiences;

1.5 listens to different types of information texts (directions, instructions, speeches, radio talk shows, television documentries), notes main ideas or specific details, and uses information appropriately;

1.6 listens actively, considering other points of view, and responds with sensitivity to ideas and suggestions;

1.7 discusses the social, moral and cultural values, attitudes and assumptions in oral texts, and comments on what is included and excluded (e.g. “Is the moral of the story true for all circumstances? What circumstances are not covered in this story?”).

LO 2

SPEAKINGThe learner will be able to communicate effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.

We know this when the learner:

2.1 communicates experiences, ideas and information in different and fairly challenging contexts for different audiences and purposes:

2.1.2 uses language for creative and imaginative self-expression (e.g. expresses feelings and thoughts, dramatises);

2.1.3 shares ideas and offers opinions on less familiar topics and events, using speculation and hypothesis;

2.1.4 describes events, presents feedback, and gives directions clearly and in an understandable way;

2.1.5 asks critical questions which do not have obvious answers, and can respond thoughtfully to such questions;

2.1.6 expresses and justifies own opinion with reasons

2.2 uses interaction strategies to communicate effectively in group situations:

2.2.1 takes turns, stays on topic, asks relevant questions, maintains discussion and responds to other’s ideas with empathy and respect;

2.2.2 gives balanced and constructive feedback;

2.2.3 uses appropriate intonation and facial expressions;

2.2.4 shows sensitivity to the rights and feelings of others during group work.

2.3 uses appropriate body language and presentation skills:

2.3.2 uses appropriate intonation and facial expressions;

2.3.3 adjusts tempo and volume for emphasis.

2.4 uses appropriate language for different purposes and audiences:

2.4.1 uses language with the appropriate register in less familiar situations;

2.4.3 uses language carefully to express complex but common emotions such as anger, impatience, sympathy, admiration.

LO 3

READING AND VIEWINGThe learner will be able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and to respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.

We know this when the learner:

3.1 reads a variety of South African and international fiction and non-fiction for different purposes (e.g. peoms, book reviews, short novels, newsletters, reference books);

3.1.1 reads independently, selecting appropriate reading and comprehension strategies for the purpose;

3.1.3 scans for specific details;

3.1.5 uses previous knowledge or textual clues to determine meaning and make inferences;

3.1.7 makes story maps or notes key points to track comprehension;

3.1.8 reads aloud clearly, adjusting speed according to purpose and audience;

3.6 understands the vocabulary and discusses how writers have used language to achieve effects (similes, rhythm, onomatopoeia);

3.11 selects relevant reading material and applies reseach skills to find information in dictionaries, reference books and textbooks from community sources or electronic media (where available);

LO 4

WRITINGThe learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.

We know this when the learner:

4.1 writes different kinds of texts for different purposes and audiences:

4.1.1 writes for personal, exploratory, playful, imaginative and creative purposes (e.g. diary, humorous anecdotes, story, poem);

4.1.2 writes informational texts expressing ideas clearly and logically for different audiences (e.g. notices, reports);

4.2 develops and organises ideas through a writing process:

4.2.2 develops the topic by consulting relevant sources, selecting relevant information and organising ideas;

4.3 produces neat and legible work with attention to presentation (e.g. cover page, title, headings, and suitable graphics);

4.4 applies knowledge of language at various levels:

4.4.1 word level;

4.4.3 paragraph level;

LO 5

THINKING AND REASONINGThe learner will able to use language to think and reason, and access, process and use information for learning.

We know this when the learner:

5.2 uses language to investigate and explore:

5.2.1 formulates relevant questions to guide search for information;

5.2.2 uses interviews to gather information;

5.2.3 can rephrase questions to get more relevant information;

5.3 processes information:

5.3.5 organises information into a paragraph, table, timeline, chart or other appropriate written or graphical representation;

Memorandum

Wordsearch

Approximately 124 words are hidden in this wordsearch. It will be quite fun to elicit the answers from the groups and list them on the board.

Fight Fight!

Once again, there is more than one correct sequence to this order of these paragraphs. By discussion and listening to the groups and their reasoning, you will be able to show the learners the different sequences. To make it easier for yourself as educator, copy the strips onto larger sheets of sheets of paper and put them up on the board, so that it ends up as a visual exercise and discussion. Ensure they learners understand why certain sequences do not work.

Families

1.

(a) Dad

(b) Andrea

(c) Alexander and Grant

(d) husband and wife

(e) F

(f) T

(g) T

(h) F

(i) T

(j) T

2.

(a) aunt

(b) brothers

(c) sister

(d) husband

(e) granny

3. (many possibilities)

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Definition of a lens

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A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

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What are tags? tag icon

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