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word power

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

Grade 5

TICKLE YOUR TASTE BUDS

Module 15

WORD POWER

OCTOPOEMS

Try your hand at describing a person or topic through this eight-line formula.

Table 1
  FORMULA! EXAMPLE!
line 1: Topic is a colour My mother is pink.
line 2: a season She is the summer time
line 3: a place in the kitchen.
line 4: a type of weather She is warm.
line 5: a type of clothing My mother is a slipper,
line 6: a piece of furniture a comfortable old sofa.
line 7: a TV show She is an Oprah show,
line 8: a type of food lumpy chicken gravy!

Try these:

A chef, a waiter, a fireman, a cow, a dinosaur, a teacher … or any other topic of your choice.

Table 2
First attempt with a partner First attempt solo
Table 3
How well did I do? Self Peer  
I could choose a topic      
I could write eight lines      
I could write each line as stated in the formula      
Fill your own criteria into this block:      
       

[LO 3.7.1; 4.1.1; 4.3]

Poems can be such fun!

Find some food poems to read and/or dramatise in groups.

Here is a list of possible poems – just in case you are stuck:

Zanzibar Pete and Zoom-along Dick by Nancy Chambers

After Breakfast by Roy Fuller

I eat my peas with honey (Anon)

How to open … by John Fuller

Sweet Song by Vernon Scannell

Late for Breakfast by Mary Dawson

Greedy Dog by James Hurley

The Vulture by Hilaire Belloc

The Flattered Flying Fish by E.V. Rieu

Boa Constrictor by Shel Silverstein

KNOW YOUR WORD POWER!

Select the correct meaning for the word and test your word power!

Table 4
  1. menu:
  1. (a) a queue of people
  2. (b) an order form
  3. (c) list from which we can order to eat
  1. waiter:
  1. (a) someone who is late for an appointment
  2. (b) a servant
  3. (c) someone who takes your order and waits on you in a restaurant
  1. chef:
  1. (a) someone who cannot pronounce his words correctly
  2. (b) the headman of a tribe
  3. (c) a trained cook
  1. diner:
  1. (a) supper
  2. (b) someone who eats out at a restaurant
  3. (c) a served meal
  1. dessert:
  1. (a) a vast area where nothing grows
  2. (b) to run away
  3. (c) pudding
  1. napkin:
  1. (a) usually a linen cloth used as a serviette
  2. (b) worn on a baby’s bottom
  3. (c) a short sleep
  1. maitre ‘d:
  1. (a) the head waiter in a restaurant
  2. (b) a French dish/meal
  3. (c) comes after maitre ‘c
  1. tureen:
  1. (a) the cloth used to wrap bodies of deceased people
  2. (b) a deep dish with lid, usually for soup
  3. (c) the female turtle
  1. liqueur:
  1. (a) a sweet alcoholic drink
  2. (b) a lollipop
  3. (c) a fizzy cold drink
  1. hors d’oeuvre:
  1. (a) a starter
  2. (b) another word for a horse
  3. (c) a herd of cattle

CHALLENGE!!

Can you make a sketch incorporating all ten of the words in the illustrations? (Only use the correct ones!)

[LO 6.1.2]

Discussion and role-play (group work)

What do you think these diners are complaining about? Discuss various options with your group members.

Act out this scene.

Firstly dramatise it in a negative and aggressive way, and following that in a positive manner.

Which is the better way of handling the problem?

[LO 1.3; 1.4; 1.6; 2.2.1; 2.2.4; 2.4.3; 2.4.4; 5.1.3]

Complete the speech bubbles

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

[LO 4.1.1; 4.4.2; 5.3.6; 5.4.1]

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)

Table 5
CHECKLIST Self Peer  
  • Is it colourful and bright?
     
  • Does it make you think the product is unique?
     
  • Is it clear and legible?
     
  • Is it set out in a way that is interesting?Does it have illustrations/graphics?
     
     
  • Does it have a suitable name?
     
  • Does it have a super slogan?
     

[LO 4.1.3; 5.3.5]

Silent reading: Carefully read through the following passage and decide whether the given statements are True (T) or False (F).

PEANUTS CAN KILL!

It seems laughable that a tiny, tasty snack can cause severe reactions, even death, in most people!

Small children are very good about avoiding nuts if they are allergic to them, and their parents make few mistakes. Children are not in control of what they are given to eat. Mistakes are usually made by the adults who are not their parents. Not many people are aware of the severity of a peanut allergy. Peanuts are not always visible in foods. Some foods contain peanuts in a way that is not obvious and anyone can make a mistake occasionally.

A person who is severely allergic can have a fatal reaction to even the slightest contact with any form of peanut extract. Very few people are aware that peanuts continue to be a common ingredient in foods ranging from biscuits and muesli to crisps and Chinese dishes. Some people are so sensitive that they can develop an allergic reaction if they kiss someone who has eaten a peanut product, or if they eat with an utensil which has been in contact with peanuts.

What is a peanut allergy?

Peanut allergy is a serious and usually life-long allergy which can affect both children and adults. It is more likely to occur in children whose parents already suffer from some sort of allergy.

Who is at risk?

Children whose mothers regularly ate peanuts or peanut products while pregnant are at risk of having this allergy. Peanut allergy is also more common in children who were exposed to peanuts at an early age.

What are the symptoms?

An allergic reaction will occur within half an hour of being exposed to peanuts. A combination of the following symptoms can appear – sometimes within minutes – of exposure: an itching in the mouth or throat; difficulty breathing and swallowing; a rash and flushed skin; stomach cramps and nausea; weakness, collapse or fainting; increased heart rate.

How does one prevent peanut allergy?

Avoid peanuts in any form

Compile a list of foods to avoid

Read the labels on all foods

Steer clear of any unknown foods.

Inform all teachers, family members, babysitters, friends and their mothers about the allergy and what to do in case of a reaction

Wear a Medic Alert bracelet

Always carry the correct medication, clearly labelled.

Table 6
    Answers
1. Peanuts can cause fatal allergic reactions. T F
2. Extracts of peanuts can be found in children’s biscuits. T F
3. You cannot react to peanuts if you kiss someone who has eaten a peanut butter sandwich. T F
4. Peanut allergy only affects adults seriously. T F
5. Allergic reactions only occur after half an hour of coming into contact with the substance. T F
6. More than one symptom can appear at the same time during an allergic reaction. T F
7. Individuals with peanut allergy must avoid all contact with all peanut products at all times. T F
8. It is not necessary to read food labels, as peanuts are always obvious in foods. T F
9. Everybody coming into contact with the allergic person should be trained or informed as to what to do in the case of an allergic reaction. T F
10. Avoid all forms of ice-cream. T F

[LO 3.1.1; 3.8.1]

FIND OUT

How is an allergic reaction treated?

Can one outgrow an allergy to peanuts?

Is there a cure for peanut allergy?

REAL-LIFE ROLE PLAY

Choose one of the following characters:

a doctor specialising in allergies

a concerned patient

a child with a peanut allergy problem

the child’s teacher

What are the questions they could ask each other about the peanut allergy,and what are the answers they could be given.

Assessment

LO 1

LISTENINGThe learner will be able to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically in a wide range of situations.

We know this when the learner:

1.3 identifies features of oral texts (structure, language, tone, register, etc.) that make them appropriate for different purposes and audiences;

1.4 discusses how language is used to create a sense of atmosphere;

LO 2

SPEAKINGThe learner will be able to communicate effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.

We know this when the learner:

2.2 uses interaction strategies to communicate effectively in group situations:

2.2.1 takes turns, stays on topic, asks relevant questions, maintains discussion and responds to other’s ideas with empathy and respect;

2.2.3 uses appropriate intonation and facial expressions;

2.2.4 shows sensitivity to the rights and feelings of others during group work.

2.3 uses appropriate body language and presentation skills:

2.3.2 uses appropriate intonation and facial expressions;

2.3.3 adjusts tempo and volume for emphasis.

2.3.4 pauses at appropriate places and adjusts pace to needs of audience;

2.4 uses appropriate language for different purposes and audiences:

2.4.1 uses language with the appropriate register in less familiar situations;

2.4.3 uses language carefully to express complex but common emotions such as anger, impatience, sympathy, admiration.

2.4.4 identifies and challenges discriminatory use of language.

LO 3

READING AND VIEWINGThe learner will be able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and to respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.

We know this when the learner:

3.1 reads a variety of South African and international fiction and non-fiction for different purposes (e.g. peoms, book reviews, short novels, newsletters, reference books);

3.1.1 reads independently, selecting appropriate reading and comprehension strategies for the purpose;

3.1.3 scans for specific details;

3.1.5 uses previous knowledge or textual clues to determine meaning and make inferences;

3.7 recognises the different structures, language use, purposes and audiences of different texts:

3.7.1 identifies the way different kinds of texts are organised (e.g. fables, letters, book reviews);

3.8 identifies and discusses environmental, cultural and social values in texts:

3.8.1 identifies and discusses point of view and its purpose and effect;

3.10 interprets and discusses more complex visual texts (e.g. tables, charts, posters, bar graphs, maps) and can change text from one form to another (e.g. a table of data into a graph).

LO 4

WRITING

The learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.

We know this when the learner:

4.1 writes different kinds of texts for different purposes and audiences:

4.1.1 writes for personal, exploratory, playful, imaginative and creative purposes (e.g. diary, humorous anecdotes, story, poem);

4.1.2 writes informational texts expressing ideas clearly and logically for different audiences (e.g. notices, reports);

4.1.3 writes and designs visual texts expressing information clearly and creatively (e.g. advertisements, newsletters, map with pictures and labels);

4.1.4 transfers information from one form into another (e.g. information from a table into a written paragraph or graph);

4.3 produces neat and legible work with attention to presentation (e.g. cover page, title, headings, and suitable graphics);

4.4 applies knowledge of language at various levels:

4.4.1 word level;

4.4.2 sentence level;

4.4.3 paragraph level.

LO 5

THINKING AND REASONINGThe learner will able to use language to think and reason, and access, process and use information for learning.

We know this when the learner:

5.1 uses language to think and reason:

5.1.3 distinguishes between advantages and disadvantages of something and explains why;

5.3 processes information:

5.3.1 collects and categorises relevant ideas and explains the reasons underlying the categorisation;

5.3.5 organises information into a paragraph, table, timeline, chart or other appropriate written or graphical representation;

5.3.6 evaluates and draws conclusions and can explain basis;

5.4 uses language to think creatively:

5.4.1 hypothesises possible results or endings to a sequence of steps or events;

LO 6

LANGUAGE STRUCTURE AND USEThe learner will know and be able to use the sounds, words and grammar of the language to create and interpret texts.

We know this when the learner:

6.1 works with words:

6.1.1 uses prefixes, stems and suffixes/extensions to form words;

6.1.3 records words in a personal dictionary;

6.1.4 uses phonics and spelling rules to spell words correctly;

6.2 works with sentences:

6.2.3 identifies and uses nouns, pronouns, prepositions, articles and conjunctions;

6.2.6 consolidates use of punctuation learned so far.

6.4 develops awareness and use of style:

6.4.1 uses language appropriate for the audience, purpose and context (e.g.

formal / informal register);

Memorandum

Wordpower

Encourage the learners to use a dictionary for this exercise. Answers at the bottom of the page in module.

1. c 2. c 3. c 4. b 5. c 6. a 7. a 8. b 9. a 10. a

Silent reading

1. T 2. T 3. F 4. F 5. F 6. T 7. T 8. F 9. T 10. T

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