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  • GETIntPhaseMaths display tagshide tags

    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Mathematics (Gr. 4-6)
    By: Siyavula

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To count forward in intervals

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

MATHEMATICS

Number Concept, Addition and Subtraction

EDUCATOR SECTION

Memorandum

1. 6; 12; 18; 24; 30; 36; 42; 48; 54; 60; 6; 72

7; 14; 21; 28; 35; 42; 49; 56; 63; 70; 7; 84

8; 16; 24; 32; 40; 48; 56; 64; 72; 80; 8; 96

9; 18; 27; 36; 45; 54; 63; 72; 81; 90; 9; 108

2. 72; 24; 48; 96; 108; 60

3. 1; 2; 5; 10

1; 3; 5; 15

1; 2; 4; 8; 16

1; 2; 3; 4; 6; 8; 12; 24

1; 2; 3; 5; 6; 10; 15; 30

4. 13; 2; 17; 11; 5; 23; 7; 19; 3; 29

5. 5.1

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

5.2 b)

6

9

4

2

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)

1. 10 000

2. twenty six thousand four hundred and nine

3. 300

4. 5 000

5. 6; 12; 18; 24

6. 1; 2; 3; 4; 6; 12

7. true

true

TEST 1

1. 6 000 + 400 + 90 + 8

  1. (1. × 1 000) + (4 × 100) + (9 × 10) + (8 × 1)

2. a) 200

b) 70 000

3. a) 2 674

b) 16 537

  1. a) 800

4. a) 7 420; 7 440

b) 16 775; 16 750

6. a) >

b) >

7. a) seventy six thousand and eight

b) 68 439

8. a) (i) 1 800

  1. (i) 34 700

b) (i) 5 000

  1. (i) 78 000

9 a) 6; 12; 18; 24

b) 1; 3; 17; 19

c) 1; 2; 3; 4; 6; 12

d) 2; 17; 19

e) 2; 4; 6; 12; 18; 24; 40

Leaner Section

Content

Activity: To count forward in intervals [LO 1.1]

To recognise, represent, describe and compare numbers, counting down and up in fixed intervals [LO 1.3]

1. LET US RACE!

The next activity will help you to improve your skill in adding or subtracting the same number every time. This way you also learn your multiplication tables that are necessary for correct multiplication and division!

Work with a friend. You need a stopwatch. You have to "climb" the following ladders by giving the correct answers. Then it is your friend's turn. The one who works fastest while doing it CORRECTLY is the winner. (Check with a pocket calculator!)

START AT THE TOP AND GO DOWN.

Figure 3
Figure 3 (graphics3.png)

NOW START AT THE BOTTOM AND GO UP.

MULTIPLES

DO YOU STILL REMEMBER?

The answers that you got in the above exercise are MULTIPLES of the 6×, 7×, 8× and 9× tables.

A MULTIPLE is obtained when a given number (e.g. 6) is multiplied by another number or series of numbers.

E.g. the multiples of 5 are 5; 10; 15; 20; 25; etc.

2. Did you know? Multiples help you to add fractions correctly. It is therefore important that you know the multiples of your multiplication tables as soon as possible. Let us practise! Colour in the multiples of 12:

Figure 4
Figure 4 (graphics4.png)

FACTORS

DID YOU KNOW?

Factors are the parts/components of a multiple. Factors of 10 are: 1; 10; 2 and 5.

If we are looking for numbers that can be divided into 12, for instance, we find 1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 4 ; 6 and 12.

These numbers are FACTORS of 12.

Suggestion: Think of "pairs":

1 × 12 = 12

2 × 6 = 12

3 × 4 = 12

3. It is important to have sufficient knowledge of factors, because this can help you to divide correctly and to simplify fractions. Try to complete the table below:

Table 1
  Number Factors
E.g. 8 1 ; 2 ; 4 ; 8
  10 ..................................................
  15 ..................................................
  16 ..................................................
  24 ..................................................
  30 ..................................................

ASK A FRIEND TO ASSESS YOUR WORK!

  • Work with a friend.
  • Answer the following questions and ask you friend to place a tick in the appropriate column:
Table 2
  Not at all Reason-ably good Good Excellent
I am able to recognise, describe and compare multiples (LO 1.3)        
I am able to recognise, describe and compare factors (LO 1.3)        
I am able to recognise, describe and compare prime numbers (LO 1.3)        
         

PRIME NUMBERS

Please note:

A PRIME NUMBER has only 2 factors:

1 and the number itself.

A PRIME NUMBER is larger than 1.

2, 3 and 5 are examples of PRIME NUMBERS, because only 1 and the number itself can be divided into 2, 3 and 5 exactly.

4. Use green to colour the "prime number leaves":

Figure 5
Figure 5 (graphics5.png)

5. BRAIN TEASER!

5.1 Arrange the numbers from 1 to 6 in the diagram in such a way that the sums of the different sides are the same.

Figure 6
Figure 6 (graphics6.png)

5.2 Arrange the numbers from 1 to 9 in such a way in the diagram that the sums of the axes (vertical and horizontal lines) are the same.

Figure 7
Figure 7 (graphics7.png)

Let us see how well you understand the above work.

Complete the following as accurately as possible:

1. Which number is 10 more than 9 990? _____________________________(1)

2. Write the following number in words: 26 409

__________________________________________________________________ (1)

3. Round off to the nearest 100: 325 _________________________________(1)

4. Round off to the nearest 1 000: 4 500______________________________ (1)

5. Encircle the multiples of 6:

6 ; 9 ; 12 ; 15 ; 18 ; 21 ; 24 (2)

6. Write down all the factors of 12.

__________________________________________________________________ (2)

7. True or False: 13 is a prime number _____________________________(1)

1 is not a prime number _____________________________(1)

10

HOW WELL DID YOU COPE THIS TIME?

  • Colour in the picture that illustrates your performance!
Figure 8
Figure 8 (graphics8.png)

TEST

1. Write the following number in expanded notation:

6 498 = _____________ + _____________ + ____________ + ____________

= (____ × ____) + (____ ×____) + (____×____) + (____×____) (4)

2. What is the value of the figures in bold print?

2.1 48 217 _________________________________________________________

2.2 76 891 ______________________________________________________ (2)

3. Provide the missing answers:

3.1 2 684 is 10 more than ____________________________________________

3.2 16 437 is 100 less than ___________________________________________

3.2 80 000 is 100 times more than ___________________________________(3)

4. Complete the following number patterns:

4.1 7 380 ; 7 400 ; ______________ ; _______________

4.2 16 825 ; 16 800 ; ______________ ; ______________ (4)

5. Arrange the following numbers from small to large:

8 008 ; 8 800 ; 8 080 ; 8 808

__________________________________________________________________ (2)

6. Insert < ; > or = :

6.1 4 876 * 4 000 + 700 + 80 + _____________________________

6.2 (9 × 8) + 4 * (81 ÷ 9) ___________________________________ (2)

7. Write the following number in words:

76 008

__________________________________________________________________ (1)

7.1 Write, using digits

sixty eight thousand four hundred and thirty nine

__________________________________________________________________ (1)

8. Round off:

8.1 to the nearest 100:

i) 1 764 _____________________________

ii) 34 712 _____________________________ (2)

8.2 to the nearest 1 000:

i) 4 632 _____________________________

ii) 78 099 _____________________________ (2)

9. Use the numbers in the block below to supply the missing answers:

Figure 9
Figure 9 (graphics9.png)

9.1 the multiples of 6

__________________________________________________________________ (2)

9.2 any two odd numbers

__________________________________________________________________ (1)

9.3 the factors of 12

__________________________________________________________________ (2)

9.4 any two prime numbers

__________________________________________________________________ (1)

9.5 any two even numbers

__________________________________________________________________ (1)

I have___________________________________ out of 30!

Colour in: I feel

Table 3
VERY HAPPY AND CONTENTED
HAPPY
UNHAPPY G
I CAN DO BETTER

Assessment

Learning Outcome 1: The learner will be able to recognise, describe and represent numbers and their relationships, and to count, estimate, calculate and check with competence and confidence in solving problems.

Assessment Standard 1.1: We know this when the learner counts forwards and backwards in whole number intervals and fractions;

Assessment Standard 1.3: We know this when the learner recognises and represents numbers in order to describe and compare them:

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