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Showing development in ability to write a dialogue

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

Grade 6

Module 8

DEVELOPING THE ABILITY TO WRITE DIALOGUE

Activity 8:

Showing development in ability to write a dialogue

[LO 4.3.1]

In this exercise, we are going to practise writing a dialogue - a conversation between two people. You will also have the opportunity to exercise your creativity as you dream up this conversation.

The conversation is going to take place between a mother and a daughter. The daughter has asked her mom if she can go on a cycling weekend to raise funds to help people with Aids. The trip lasts for two days and there will be three adult professional cyclists accompanying the group. In the conversation, the mother must express the concerns that she has about this trip. She must also ask questions regarding the details she would need to know, in order for her to make the decision about whether to let her daughter go or not. The daughter must try to convince her mom that the trip is for a good cause and she should be allowed to go Your dialogue must end with the mom coming to her decision and very clearly giving her daughter the reasons for her decision.

Important points to remember as you write:

  • New speaker = new line
  • Leave a line between speakers
  • No inverted commas

First write the following:

ROUGH DRAFT: Brainstorming / Mind Map

FINAL DRAFT

Activity 2:

Showing development in ability to write a dialogue

To use quotation marks (direct speech) correctly

[LO 4.3.1, 4.5.3]]

Lets take things one step further now! We are still dealing with a conversation in this exercise, but the conversation is between two girls. This time, you and your group will have to guess what is being said by looking carefully at the pictures. This is once again a chance for you to be creative, but remember to listen to everybody’s contribution before making your decision. When you write your answers on the lines, remember to make use of punctuation, e.g. exclamation marks, question marks and commas.

THE LOST BICYCLES

Figure 1
Figure 1 (Picture 1.png)
Figure 2
Figure 2 (Picture 2.png)
Figure 3
Figure 3 (Picture 3.png)
Figure 4
Figure 4 (Picture 4.png)
Figure 5
Figure 5 (Picture 5.png)
Figure 6
Figure 6 (Picture 6.png)

Our group suggestions:

This is what the girls are actually saying:

Match the words with the balloons. Write the letter next to the appropriate number.

a Ouch! My Leg!

b Can you see it?

c Hello Deb. Where's your bike?

d And here's my stolen bike too.

e Jump on. I'll give you a lift.

f Mind that dog, Sally!

g Here it is Deb. I've found it.

h No, the water is as black as ink.

i Never mind your leg. What about my bike?

j Thanks. Let's go down to the canal.

k Oh no!

l Somebody stole it last night.

Table 1
1  
2  
3  
4  
5  
6  
7  
8  
9  
10  
11  
12  

That is good work, but lets take it one step further now…

REWRITE THE SENTENCES ABOVE USING QUOTATION (SPEECH) MARKS

e.g. Deb shouted, "Mind that dog, Sally!"

Remember to use words such as shouted, asked, replied, answered, warned, offered, moaned, said.

Activity 3:

Showing development in ability to write a dialogue

To use additional language creatively

[LO 4.3.1]

Your educator is going to divide you into partners for the next exercise. You and your partner are going to choose one of the situations listed below. You are then going to prepare a dialogue between the two people involved in the situation you have chosen. Once your dialogue is prepared, you must practise it well as each pair will be given a chance to present their scene to the class. It is important that you dress up and do your best to become the character you are portraying. Pay special attention to speaking clearly and making the scene interesting to watch. Check your rubric before you start.

Choose one of the situations below:

  • An accident scene: One car has just collided with another. Act out the dialogue that follows, as the drivers try to decide what happened and who is to blame.
  • A driving lesson scene: A dialogue between the impatient driving instructor and the nervous learner driver during the lesson.
  • Traffic offence scene: The dialogue between a motorist who has broken the law and a traffic officer who is required to fine/arrest/test the motorist.
  • Police station scene: The dialogue between a drunk motorist arrested for drunken driving and the police officer who is trying to complete paper work about the incident.

Plan your dialogue:

  • Rough draft / Brainstorming
  • Final Copy
  • Our Dialogue Title:

Assessment

Table 2
LO 4
WRITINGThe learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.
We know this when the learner:
4.3 writes creatively:
4.3.1 shows development in the ability to write stories, play scripts and dialogues;
4.5 understands the writing process, and uses developing knowledge of language structure and use:
4.5.3 edits writing, using knowledge of structure and tools.

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