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    This module is included inLens: Siyavula: Languages (Gr. 4-6)
    By: SiyavulaAs a part of collection: "English First Additional Language Grade 6"

    Collection Review Status: In Review

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To interact in additional language

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

Grade 6

Module 31

TO INTERACT IN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

Activity 1:

To express feelings [LO 2.1.4]

To talk about an issue with preparation [LO 2.3.5]

I am sure you know GARFIELD, the cat with an attitude. Do you know LINUS? (He is Charlie Brown’s friend in the Snoopy/Peanuts cartoons.)

Have you noticed that both these characters have a well-loved possession? Linus always has his blanket (which Snoopy tries to grab from him) and Garfield has a teddy bear.

We all own something that is special to us for some or other reason. Even if other people think it strange. Maybe if you could explain to them what makes your possession special, they would get the picture! In this activity, we are going to do exactly that! You are going to choose something that is very special to you and then you are going to complete the following tasks.

So here is what YOU have to do:

  • Bring your well-loved possession to class.
  • Show it to the class and point out what you love about it.
  • Explain how it came to be so special in your eyes.
  • Be prepared to answer questions about your special possession.

Your talk should last about 1 - 1½ minute. Read through the rubric at the end of the activity to see how your educator and peers will be assessing you.

Use these pointers to help you plan your talk:

The special possession I am going to talk about is:

Where did this special possession come from?

What makes it so special to me?

Educator and Peer Assessment Chart

Table 1
Criteria 1 2 3 4
Enunciation Unclear Developing, not always clear Good Excellent
Eye-contact Could not do Beginning to use Good. Maintained through most of the talk Excellent. Maintained throughout the talkCovered the whole audience
Pace Difficult to follow Reasonable Good flow, very little faltering Excellent flow, no faltering
Sincerity, Conviction, Enthusiasm Showed none Reasonable use Good. Evident during most of the talk Extremely evident throughout the talk
Use of Visual aids and preparation None used Very little, but starting to understand the importance Good Excellent
Use of notes Lacking notes Correct use still developing – very dependent on notes Good Excellent,.Complimented talk. Excellent talk without notes

Assessment

Table 2
LO 2
SPEAKINGThe learner will be able to communicate effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.
We know this when the learner:
2.1 interacts in additional language:
2.1.2 sustains a conversation on a familiar topic;
2.1.3 expresses an opinion and gives reasons for it;
2.1.4 expresses feelings;
2.3 uses additional language to communicate information:
2.3.5 talks about an issue with preparation;
2.5 shows awareness of the way language constructs knowledge and identity and positions people:
2.5.1 begins to look critically at naming practices (e.g. women taking their husbands’ surnames, etc.)

Memorandum

This activity gives learners the opportunity to prepare an oral to present to the class. The topic for the oral is “Something that is special to me.” Learners must choose one of their belongings that is very special, bring it to school and then explain to the class what it is, where it came from, and why it is so special to them. After their presentation, the class may ask them questions about their special possession. The talk must be 1-1½ minutes long, and learners can make use of the assessment chart to assess each other.

Keep in mind that this is often a daunting task for many learners. Make sure that they have adequate time to prepare and make them feel as relaxed as possible.

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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

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What are tags? tag icon

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