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    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Languages (Gr. 7-9)
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Proverbs and expressions

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

Grade 7

Module 5

PROVERBS AND EXPRESSIONS

Proverbs and expressions

Don’t be a cloud if you can be the sky.Don’t be a feather if you can be a bird and fly!

Complete the following “bird” proverbs and then match the short explanation with the correct proverb or expression.

[LO 6.4.3]

Table 1
Proverbs / expression Match Explanation
1. Birds of a feather   (a) The person being sought (prisoner) has escaped.
2. The early bird   (b) I heard a rumour.
3. A bird in the hand   (c) To achieve a double result with one effort.
4. Fine feathers   (d) A general view from above.
5. A bird’s view   (e) Those who are early will find the most opportunities.
6. The bird has   (f) People of a similar character are usually found together.
7. To kill two birds   (g) A small possession is preferable to a large expectation.
8. A little bird   (h) People are judged by their outward appearance.

Now how about having some Roald Dahl kind of fun? You know, where you twist the ending to make it amusing.

EXAMPLE: Have you ever wondered about the worm in the saying, “The early bird catches the worm.” Would it be correct then to say, “The early worm gets caught.”

Take any well-known proverbs or expressions and give them a twist.

Table 2
LO 4.1.2  

Celebrate diversity

Take a look around you. Notice how different you appear from the outside. Just imagine how vastly different each one is on the inside of their heads and hearts too.

Instead of trying to blend in and be like everyone else, be proud of and celebrate your unique differences and qualities.

To understand this, try the following in your group. Each person must bring a different fruit to add toward making a bowl of fruit salad. Once you have added the sliced fruit to the bowl, enjoy eating it. You will notice that a fruit salad is delicious, precisely because each fruit maintains its own flavour.

(Compare this to soup, which has many different ingredients, and is then put in a blender. Lovely and thick and tasty - but notice the colour and try to identify individual vegetables!)

So now you have taken time out to get to know yourself better and you have had time to get to know others around you better too. Hopefully you will have enjoyed a deliciously tasty bowl of fruit salad and taken the decision to remain true to your own character and not become blended soup.

The challenge now is:

  • Choose an example of synergy and dramatise it for your class.
  • Hints: synergy in nature (tick birds) / synergy in music (band or choir) /synergy in gymnastics (pyramid building).
  • Be original and creative!

Roadblocks to celebrating diversity

1. Ignorance

This means you don’t have the slightest clue what other people believe, how they feel or what they have experienced to make them the way they are.

Ignorance often shows itself at its worst when it comes to understanding people with disabilities. A young deaf girl said the question she hates most is:

“What’s it like being deaf?”

Her answer?

“I don’t know. What’s it like being hearing? It isn’t like anything. It just is.”

2. Cliques

Birds of a feather flock together. But what do they learn from one another if they are all alike?

If you consider your sister to be talkative and you are the quiet type, instead of being irritated by her, get her to help you with your prepared oral next time!

In other words, try to learn from the strengths of others.

How do your class groups allow for this? Who are YOU in the “zoo”?

Cliques / collective nouns

A collective noun is given to a collection or group of similar persons, animals or things - e.g. herd, bunch, flock.

The box below contains a number of collective nouns. Insert them in the correct spaces in the phrases below:

litter; flock; choir; school; batch; galaxy; plague; kindle

Table 3
A _______________________of singers A ________________________of stars
A _______________________of fish A ________________________of birds
A _______________________of insects A ______________________of puppies
A _______________________of kittens A _______________________of scones
Table 4
LO 6.2.1  

3. Prejudice

No matter where you are born, everyone starts out as a baby. No matter how rich or poor you are, how short or tall, powerful or humble, everyone finally dies.

All men are born equal, but are they treated equally?

Take a look at Denver and Jason. The punch-line makes you think, doesn’t it? How did you (and I) become prejudiced? We were not born prejudiced. So how did it happen?

. You have had the opportunity to get to know a number of people in your class, both boys and girls. Write a humorous piece entitled “VIVE LA DIFFERENCE!” to celebrate gender differences.

Table 5
LO 2.4.7   LO 2.4.8  

Rate your openness to diversity in each of the following categories. Are you a shunner, tolerator or celebrator?

Table 6
  Shunner Tolerator Celebrator
Dress      
Age      
Religion      
Gender      
Race      
Table 7
LO 3.8.3  

Right, let us put your brain into gear!

As a group, do a PNI analysis of DIVERSITY. A what?

P = POSITIVE facts

N = NEGATIVE facts

I = INTERESTING facts

Table 8
LO 5.1.4  

If we cannot end our differences, at least we can make the world safe for diversity.

JF Kennedy

Using the information about diversity, synergy and prejudice that you have gathered so far, hold a class debate on the quote by JF Kennedy.

Table 9
LO 2.4.1  

The following poem by an unknown source tells the sad tale of what happens when people pre-judge one another:

The cold within

Six humans trapped by happenstance, in bleak and bitter cold,

Each one possessed a stick of wood, or so the story’s told.

Their dying fire in need of logs, the first man held his back,

For of the faces ‘round the fire, he noticed one was black.

The next man looking ‘cross the way saw one not of his church,

And couldn’t bring himself to give the fire his stick of birch.

The third one sat in tattered clothes, he gave his coat a hitch,

Why should his log be put to use to warm the idle rich?

The rich man just sat back and thought of the wealth he had in store,

And how to keep what he had earned from the lazy, shiftless poor.

The black man’s face bespoke revenge as the fire passed from sight,

For all he saw in his stick of wood was a chance to spite the white.

The last man of this forlorn group did naught except for gain,

Giving only to those who gave was how he played the game.

Their logs held tight in death’s still hand was proof of human sin,

They didn’t die from the cold without – they died from the cold within.

Poet unknown

How’s your heart? Cold within? How will your heart contribute to the future of this country, this world?

Table 10
LO 2.4.6  

As a group, do a 2-minute presentation, as if for TV,

Making diversity safe in South Africa

Write, from your heart, a piece entitled PREJUDICE.

Table 11
LO 6.5.3  

Celebrating similarities and differences

Synonyms

Match up the words in the left-hand column with the word of the samemeaning in the right-hand column.

Table 12
Answers Same meaning  
  1. Wide (a) halt
  2. Adhere (b) conceal
  3. Stubborn (c) broad
  4. Stop (d) choice
  5. Slender (e) obstinate
  6. Fatigue (f) strange
  7. Peculiar (g) pleased
  8. Hide (h) thin
  9. Option (i) stick
  10. Glad (j) weariness

Antonyms

Change the meanings of the words in italics, in the phrases below, to their opposites.

Table 13
1. an uglycaterpillar  
2. maximumsecurity  
3. private property  
4. a juniorstudent  
5. the failure of a plan  

Homonyms

Write down words that are pronounced similarly to those below, but are spelt differently (sent / cent). Also use your words in a sentence which will make its meaning clear. (I received one cent change.)

  1. Flour
  2. Herd
  3. Fore
  4. Herd
  5. Fore
  6. Foul
  7. Week
  8. Piece
  9. Prophet
  10. quay

Assessment

Table 14
LO 2
SPEAKINGThe learner will be able to communicate confidently and effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.
We know this when the learner:
2.2 communicates ideas, facts and opinions clearly and with some accuracy and coherence, using a limited range of factual oral text types (e.g. discussions, short arguments);
2.4 demonstrates basic interaction skills by participating actively in group discussions, conversations, interviews and debates.
2.4.2 takes on different roles;
2.4.3 acknowledges other opinions;
2.4.6 bridges gaps by asking questions, giving choices, keeping responses open-ended and showing genuine interest.
LO 3
READING AND VIEWINGThe learner will be able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.
We know this when the learner:
3.4 shows understanding of information texts;
3.4.1 identifies main ideas and explains how details support the main idea;
3.7 identifies and sicusses techniques used to create particular effects in selected visual, written and multimedia texts such as:
3.7.1 simple literary devices and use of language (e.g. word play, register).
LO 4
WRITINGThe learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.
We know this when the learner:
4.1 writes a selected range of imaginative texts:
4.1.1 to express imagination, ideas and feelings about self and others;
4.1.2 to explore the creative and playful use of language by means of narrative and descriptive compositions, diaries, friendly letters, dialogues, poems, cartoons, limericks and songs;
4.3 demonstrates basic skills in selected features of writing appropriate to the text type (e.g. uses straightforward language in simple descriptions).
LO 5
THINKING AND REASONINGThe learner will be able to use language to think and reason, as well as to access, process and use information for learning.
We know this when the learner:
5.1 uses language to think and reason:
5.1.3 weighs options by deciding which of two alternatives is the better choice;
5.2 uses language to investigate and explore:
5.2.3 listens to, reads and views texts from a variety of sources to collect and select ideas.
5.2.5 works on integrated projects across Learning Areas and produces a synthesised product.
5.4 thinks creatively:
LO 6
LANGUAGE STRUCTURE AND USEThe learner will know and be able to use the sounds, words and grammar of the language to create and interpret texts.
We know this when the learner:
6.1 works with words:
6.1.3 uses the dictionary and thesaurus o increase vocabulary and improve spelling;
6.2 works with sentences:
6.2.1 identifies and uses nouns, verbs, modals, adjectives, pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions, and articles.
6.4 develops awareness and use of style:
6.4.3 uses idioms and idiomatic expressions of the language appropriately.

Memorandum

1. Birds of a feather flock together.

2. The early bird catches the worm.

3. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.

4. Fine feathers make fine birds.

5. A bird’s view OR A bird’s eye view.

6. The bird has flown.

7. To kill two birds with one stone.

8. A little bird told me.

Match:

1. (f)

2. (e)

3. (g)

4. (h)

5. (d)

6. (a)

7. (c)

8. (b)

(a) choir

(b) galaxy

(c) school

(d) flock

(e) plague

(f) litter

(g) kindle

(h) batch

Table 15
Positive Negative Interesting
  • Interesting to experience many different stimuli.
  • One’s life is enriched by diversity – learn new things, gain friends, greater insight.
  • There can be misunderstandings and miscommunication (e.g. if one doesn’t understand the language).
  • Fear and distrust because people don’t know other groups.
  • Ignorance creates antagonism.
Variety, and many new things to be learnt, e.g. cultural, religious things.

1. (c)

2. (i)

3. (e)

4. (a)

5. (h)

6. (j)

7. (f)

8. (b)

9. (d)

10. (g)

1. beautiful / pretty

2. minimum

3. public

4. senior

5. success

1. flower

  • I picked a pretty flower for my mother on Mother’s Day.

2. heard

  • I heard the news of the Springboks’ victory.

3. four / for

  • I bought four sweets for my friends.

4. fowl

  • The fowl pecked at the maize on the ground.

5. weak

  • A new foal is usually weak and struggles to its feet after it is born.

6. peace

  • We all pray that there will be peace in the world.

7. profit

  • The new shop is making a huge profit.

8. key

  • This is the key to my front door.

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