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Giving advice

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

Grade 7

Module 15

GIVING ADVICE

Figure 1
Figure 1 (Picture 1.png)

What advice would you give to a friend who …

Figure 2
Figure 2 (Picture 2.png)
Figure 3
Figure 3 (Picture 3.png)

When giving advice, take care to _______________

and not to _________

Figure 4
Figure 4 (Picture 4.png)
Table 1
Checklist
Advice constructive  
Tone friendly  
Paragraphed  
(own criteria)  
(own criteria)  
Figure 5
Figure 5 (Picture 6.png)

Most parents welcome the interest shown by loving grandparents in their offspring.

However, when 15-year-old Edmund Emil Kemper was invited to spend a weekend with the old folks in August 1964 in California, his mother told them, “Don’t bother. The boy’s a real weirdo!” But his grandparents insisted and Edmund duly appeared.

On August 27, Ed phoned his mom to report on his holiday. It had not gone well. Standing with a still warm shotgun in his hands he told his mom, “I just wondered how it would feel to shoot Grandma.” Kemper was jailed for 5 years.

In 1973 Ed made another call. It was to the local police department. “I think I should give myself up …” he announced, and then listed sadism, cannibalism, murder, mutilation and other ghastly activities of which he was guilty. In particular he had used a hammer to finish off his own mother and a visiting friend after he had killed them with his own hands. Kemper continues to serve his life sentence.

Read the short extract well and then answer the questions below by only ticking or highlighting T for True or F for False in the grid provided.

  • The boy’s grandparents loved him dearly and invited him to spend the weekend with them in California.
  • Edmund Kemper turned 15 in 1973.
  • The mother warned his grandparents that he was a strange child.
  • He was still holding the shotgun because he had just returned from hunting buck when his mother called him by telephone.
  • Kemper was jailed for assaulting and injuring his grandfather.
  • In 1973 when Kemper gave himself to the police, he was a free man.
  • Kemper told the police that he was guilty of eating the flesh of his victims.
  • He also informed the police that he had tortured his victims.
  • He had shot and killed his mother and the postman.
  • Kemper was sentenced to death and is still awaiting his sentence to be carried out.

Mark the answers clearly:

Table 2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.
T T T T T T T T T T
F F F F F F F F F F
Table 3
LO 3.2  

TEEN WORDS (association)

  1. List 10 words with which you, being a teenager, associate (e.g. pimples; daydream; moods)
  2. Use a dictionary to find the correct, yet brief, meanings of these words.
Table 4
  WORD DEFINITION
1.    
2.    
3.    
4.    
5.    
6.    
7.    
8.    
9.    
10.    
  1. Design a crossword puzzle, using these words as the answers and their definitions as the clues.
  2. Use the grid provided, and shade the unused blocks.
Table 5
                                       
                                       
                                       
                                       
                                       
                                       
                                       
                                       
                                       
Table 6
LO 6.1.2  
LO 6.1.3  

IT COULD HAPPEN TO ME . . .

Test your reading skills

Carefully read this extract taken from It can’t happen to me, by Adele Searll. This extract is a shortened and slightly adapted version of Greg’s case history, pages 20 – 22 in the book.

When Greg turned 14, his mother met and married her fourth husband, Peter. Shortly afterwards, the family was relocated to Cape Town from Durban and Greg was sent to a local high school. This was where he came into contact with dagga for the first time.

Greg did not know a soul at his new school. Being a stranger to Cape Town, he felt shy and awkward and was eager to be accepted by his classmates. One afternoon, a boy in his class, Terry, surreptitiously called Greg aside, showed him a broken-off bottleneck and asked him if he knew what it was. Greg shook his head. He shrugged.

“It’s a dagga pipe”, said the older boy … “it’ll make you feel absolutely amazing. I guarantee that it’ll help you to forget all your troubles.” As Greg did not want to disappoint his friend, he took the pipe. Within a few weeks Greg was smoking dagga pipes every afternoon after school and regularly over weekends.

Greg recalls, “It made me feel ‘cool’ and one of the crowd. I knew that the drug was illegal and that it was affecting my health, but I was desperate to be accepted by the other guys. If they had asked me jump off a building with them, I would have jumped.”

The months passed and Greg found that he needed to smoke more and more in order to achieve the same sensation. “My marks at school deteriorated and I bunked classes at every opportunity. I was a keen sportsman, but I lost interest in rugby. I began to steal small amounts of money to finance my habit. I lost interest in my appearance and personal hygiene. I was scruffy and unshaven and washed my hair only when I was forced to do so. Of course, at the time I thought I looked quite normal.”

Greg told his parents that he had taken up jogging, to avoid arousing their suspicion. As soon as he had left the house, he would sprint along the road to the drug dealer’s house, smoke himself into a stupor and rush home again. In that way he could con his parents into thinking his red face was from the exertion of the exercise …

Answer the following questions:

Explain in your own words what the following mean (in context).

  • stranger
  • awkward
  • illegal
  • sensation
  • Select the correct answer: Terry promised Greg that using drugs would help him (to cope at school academically; to cope with everything that was bothering him; make it into the first rugby team).
  • Why do you think Greg continued smoking dagga, even though he knew it was illegal and not good for his health?
  • Find a sentence in the extract and write it down, which tells the reader that Greg was becoming addicted to the drug.
  • How did taking drugs affect Greg’s schoolwork?

  1. Greg said he thought he looked quite normal. How do we know that this was not the case?
  2. True or False: Greg took up jogging.
  3. Complete the sentence: Greg’s parents thought that …….
  4. Do you agree or disagree with the statement and say why (give a reason)?

Greg knew what he was letting himself in for whenhe started smoking dagga pipes.

Table 7
LO 3.4   LO 3.8.2   LO 3.10  

SPEAKING

What interests teenagers? Select something which interests you and present it to your peers in an ‘out of the ordinary’ way.

Table 8
LO 2.1   LO 2.2  

Prepared reading exercise

Select a piece of text, of your own choice, to read for enjoyment and evaluation purposes.

Your peers will be assessing your reading skill, using the following criteria:

Table 9
LO 3.1   LO 3.10  

Reading and viewing

Read the given extract.

Figure 6
Figure 6 (Picture 16.png)

So you’re expecting a teenager? How wonderful. During the 13-year wait some of the excitement does wear off, but the fact remains that you are embarking on one of the most exhilarating rides human relations can provide. You are on the brink of a time when night will be turned into day and the house will be cluttered with the hardware of adolescence, a time of physical stress and emotional strain, awash in a sea of hormones. A time when your telephone bill will treble.

You can never be sure when a teenager is going to arrive. The gestation period varies widely and unpredictably. Some people are still pink and innocent at 16. Some go to bed one night with a Pony Club annual and a mug of cocoa, and emerge the next morning with 3 earrings and a bad attitude. No one heard a thing.

But your teenager may not arrive in this way. The phased entrance is a popular alternative. With this option, the physical manifestations and the stroppy mind-set arrive on different days, and not in any particular order. This makes it possible to accommodate rebellion before acne sets in, or vice versa. If this sounds like a more attractive proposition, don’t get excited. It is all beyond your control. The genetic template that makes each human unique will decide whether your teenager arrives on the first Thursday in January, or weekly throughout the following year.

What we can say with certainty is that time between the age of 12 and 20, a teenager is born.

It is not a modern aberration that you can escape by taking your family to live on a tiny island in the Pacific. It is not a stage of life that can be skipped, no matter how sensible or biddable or angelic the child. Even Mother Theresa was spotty and misunderstood for a year or two.

What is the shape of things to come? And what is its estimated time of arrival? There aren’t many certainties with teenagers. One of the few is that they do not make good roommates for younger siblings. Nor for older ones. In fact they make completely impossible roommates for any member of the human race, and should therefore be housed separately, preferably in soundproofed seclusion.

If the smallness of the house or the size of your family makes this impossible you had better get used to the idea that blood will be shed. One of the most precious things you can give your teenager is her own door to slam. Think of it as a gift to the family.

You can also issue a Turbulence Warning. “Sometime in the next 2 years your brother is going to be touchy, reclusive, noisy, silent, stunningly mature, bristly, and foolhardy.” Does it help? I don’t think so.

Teenagers need you to be silent and invisible, but very palpably there. Not so much for clean clothes and food.

They need you to be around because their crises can be very big ones. They may have to make decisions of live and death. Or they may have a brush with the law. Your role as slayer of dragons and fixer of messes should diminish as your children reach their late teens. But it is an invariable rule of parenthood that a child who is going to crash his moped will not do it until you’re away having a quiet weekend in the country.

I don’t know what teenagers did before telephones. I suppose carrier pigeons flapped back and forth in a cloud of dust and feathers. Or arrows with messages wrapped around them hummed across the village green. They must have managed to stay in touch somehow.

Teenage telephone conversations are important, but they are never about anything important. A system of jungle drums would achieve the same effect at a fraction of the cost. What can they possibly have to say? It baffles parents when teenagers dash to telephone someone she just sat next to in the school bus.

Teenagers need solitude. They need to spend long hours mooching, dreaming and gazing into space. Sometimes they need to lie completely inert beneath their duvets. This drives brisk and breezy parents around the bend. Teenagers actually need that time to ponder and fantasise.

So a normal teenager needs to belong, in particular to another group of teenagers, and she needs to be separate from her parents. She needs to be able to let off steam, play, argue and confirm in as many noisy ways as possible that she is alive.

(Adapted slightly)

In your groups, discuss the following:

  • for whom has this article been written (target reader)?
  • what is the article about?
  • do you identify with what the writer is saying?
  • Why? In what way do you identify with his message?
Table 10
LO 5.3.4  
  • Identify 10 important points in the text. Mind map them below – very briefly.
Table 11
LO 5.3.1   LO 5.3.3  
  • Now, using the points you (as a group) jotted down on the mind map, write a short summary of the article. Try not to refer back to the original text and, as far as possible, use your own words.
  • Compare your notes and summary with that of other groups.
Table 12
LO 5.3.5  

Assessment

Table 13
LO 3
READING AND VIEWINGThe learner is able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.
We know this when the learner:
3.1 reads spontaneously and for pleasure and information across the range of text types studied, describes personal response and discusses the kinds of texts enjoyed;
3.2 reads aloud and silently for a variety of purposes using appropriate reading strategies (e.g. skimming and scanning, predictions, contextual clues, inferences);
3.4 shows understanding of information texts;
3.4.1 identifies main ideas and explains how details support the main idea;
3.8 responds critically to texts;
3.8.2 identifies implicit (or hidden) messages in the text;
3.10 reflects on own skills as a reader.
LO 4
WRITINGThe learner is able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.
We know this when the learner:
4.1 writes a selected range of imaginative texts:
4.1.2 to explore the creative and playful use of language by means of narrative and descriptive compositions, diaries, friendly letters, dialogues, poems, cartoons, limericks and songs;
4.2 produces a selected range of factual written and multi-modal texts (texts using print and images) for various purposes, using visual and design elements where appropriate by means of eyewitness accounts, posters, advertisements, book reviews, recipes, and game instructions;
4.4 uses the writing process with assistance and collaboratively to generate texts:
4.4.1 selects and explores topics through brainstorming, using mind maps and lists;
4.4.4 organises ideas coherently in simple, logical order to produce first drafts;
4.4.5 reflects on drafts, considering purpose, audience, language usage and logical organisation, and revises appropriately;
4.4.8 publishes final product, paying attention to presentation and basic elements of design.
LO 5
THINKING AND REASONINGThe learner is able to use language to think and reason, and access, process and use information for learning.
We know this when the learner:
5.1 uses language to think and reason:
5.1.1 infers and deduces meaning, and explains the intentions of the author by interpreting written, visual and aural texts across the curriculum;
5.1.4 expresses and develops a clear personal viewpoint;
5.1.5 supports an argument with various kinds of evidence;
5.1.7 uses appropriate language structures to express complex thought;
5.3 processes information:
5.3.1 records information in an accessible format (e.g. lists, mind maps, notes, summaries);
5.3.3 changes information from one format into another (e.g. mind map into paragraph, list into summary);
5.3.4 reflects critically by sharing and challenging ideas;
5.3.5 compares different points of view, and identifies differences and similarities.

Memorandum

p.10 : Teenager gone wrong

  • T
  • F
  • T
  • F
  • F
  • T
  • T
  • T
  • F
  • F

Teen words

There should be no problem in the learners providing words for the list. However, take care of ‘risky’ words – words which perhaps cross over the decency barrier.

It can’t happen to me

1. stranger : someone who is new to a place and has no friends / awkward : to feel weird or strange ; not to fit in with the rest / illegal : not legal ; not allowed to do something by law / sensation : feeling

2. to cope with everything that was bothering him

3. It made him feel ‘cool’ and one of the crowd and he was desperate to be accepted by the other guys.

4. ‘The months passed and Greg found that he needed to smoke more and more in order to achieve the same sensation.’

  1. His marks deteriorated.
  2. He lost interest in his appearance and his personal hygiene. He was scruffy and unshaven and only washed his hair when forced to do so.
  3. F
  4. … he was jogging / exercising.
  5. Open memo – debatable point

Reading and viewing

With regards to the following sections : work through this section thoroughly, starting with the reading. Make sure the children discuss the questions below the reading at length. Even get them to highlight keywords (not more that 10 – 12). .

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