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  • GETSenPhaseLang display tagshide tags

    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Languages (Gr. 7-9)
    By: Siyavula

    Module Review Status: In Review
    Collection Review Status: In Review

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Slanguage

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

SLANGUAGE

Almost everyone uses slang on some occasions.Slang introduces many new words into the language by combining old words into new meanings or sometimes even an entirely new word.

  1. Do you know what the following words mean, or how they would be used?
Table 1
to be spaced out to barf grass / pot to ‘split’
have a hang-up to be pooped something is cool the fuzz
a rip-off to be stoned bread (not to eat) grub
  1. Slang words, after a while, can be accepted as ‘regular’ words. The following are now accepted into normal language: what do they mean?
Table 2
TV   belly-button  
hot-dog   once in a blue moon  
boss   to lie low  
  1. You have been asked to help compile items for a new dictionary of slang. Think of eight slang words for ‘regular’ (accepted) words, and provide a short definition for each word.
Table 3
LO 1.6   LO 6.4.2   LO 6.6  
  1. Write your ‘new’ slang onto strips of paper and display them on the walls of the classroom. How much fun can you have using your innovative language? Try it out and see what happens …
Table 4
LO 6.1.2  
LO 6.1.3  

TABOO LANGUAGE

Socially unacceptable language

This is the use of expletives / use of “filthy” language.

How would you explain the meaning of “filthy” language to someone who did not understand the term?

In all societies there are certain words that are considered taboo. Taboo is a Tongan word which means: acts that are forbidden or to be avoided, or reference to these acts. Some words are taboo because they refer to religious customs.

In our culture, taboo words or socially unacceptable language can be defined as

  1. using the Lord’s name in vain;
  2. calling people by the names of private body parts;
  3. referring to body parts in a crude fashion;
  4. talking ‘dirty’;
  5. …. (can you add to this list?) ….

Discussion

  • Who would use this type of language?
  • When would this type of language be used?
  • Why would people speak this way?
  • Where / In which situations would this type of language be used?

Table 5
LO 6.4.2  

OPINIONS, CONFLICT AND COMPROMISE

  • Read the statements below. You may agree with some of them and disagree with others.
  • Refer to the grid to show your opinion and how strong it is: write down the number next to each statement.
Table 6
Agreestrongly Agree;not strongly Neutral Disagree,not strongly Disagreestrongly1
Figure 1
Figure 1 (Picture 4.png)

You will realise that these are very emotive issues and everybody will have an opinion based on their beliefs.

RESPECT

  • What will happen if you voice your opinion to your partner who believes differently to you?

Your partner cannot be persuaded to change his/her mind. What do you do?

  • How would you try to persuade your partner to see things your way?
Figure 2
Figure 2 (Picture 6.png)

What is conflict?

What is compromise?

  • Role-play a scene demonstrating how a difference in opinion can lead to CONFLICT.
  • Now – demonstrate how you can both part happily after COMPROMISING.
Table 7
LO 1.5   LO 5.1.7  
  • Together with your partner, write a short scene, in dialogue format, demonstrating a difference in opinion ending in compromise.

Figure 3
Figure 3 (Picture 7.png)

Table 8
LO 4.1.2  

So often – when you are ‘difficult’ (according to your parents), they wonder if their children were not swopped in the hospital after birth … !But how about this? An untitled poem from a Calvin and Hobbes cartoon book conveys the message that the writer’s parents are aliens from outer space and living on earth in disguise!

Complete this unfinished poem, using your own words.

My mom and my dad are not what they seem.

Their __________ appearance is part of their _________

I know of ____________

My _______________________ freaks!

They landed on ___________ in ______________.

Posing as _______________________________

My parents deny this, but I know the truth

They’re here to _________________________

Early each morning, as the sun rises,

Mom and Dad put on ______________________

I knew right away ______________________________

Table 9
LO 4.1.2  

Help? It is easier when you follow a formula, for example - allow every 2 lines to rhyme.

CHALLENGE

In your groups, work on the following:

  • Practice your version of the poem as a choral verse and perform it for the rest of the class. Remember that certain parts can be performed by the group as a whole or by solo performers. Synchronised movements by the group or parts of the group can also be done. Pauses, varying tempo and volume, enunciation … all add to the success of the ‘production’.
  • Evaluate your own and each other’s performances, using the blank grid for this purpose.
Table 10
LO 2.1  

Assessment

Table 11
Learning Outcomes(LOs)
 
LO 1
LISTENINGThe learner is able to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically in a wide range of situations.
Learning Outcomes(LOs)
 
LO 1
LISTENINGThe learner is able to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically in a wide range of situations.
We know this when the learner:
  • identifies particular words, phrases and sentences, which influence the listener, and explains their impact (e.g. emotive language, distinguishing between fact and opinion, recognising bias and prejudice).
  • recognises and accepts different varieties of the language such as different accents, dialects and the language of different age groups (e.g. slang).
LO 2
SPEAKING The learner is able to communicate confidently and effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.
We know this when the learner:
2.1 communicates ideas and feelings expressively with confidence and with some assistance, using selected oral text types (e.g. stories, jokes, dramas);
2.2 communicates ideas, facts and opinions clearly and with some accuracy and coherence, using a limited range of factual oral text types (e.g. discussions, short arguments);
2.4.7 shows sensitivity to the rights and feelings of others.
LO 4
WRITINGThe learner is able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.
We know this when the learner:
4.1 writes a selected range of imaginative texts:
4.1.2 to explore the creative and playful use of language by means of narrative and descriptive compositions, diaries, friendly letters, dialogues, poems, cartoons, limericks and songs;
4.2 produces a selected range of factual written and multi-modal texts (texts using print and images) for various purposes, using visual and design elements where appropriate by means of eyewitness accounts, posters, advertisements, book reviews, recipes, and game instructions;
4.4 uses the writing process with assistance and collaboratively to generate texts:
4.4.1 selects and explores topics through brainstorming, using mind maps and lists;
4.4.4 organises ideas coherently in simple, logical order to produce first drafts;
4.4.5 reflects on drafts, considering purpose, audience, language usage and logical organisation, and revises appropriately;
4.4.8 publishes final product, paying attention to presentation and basic elements of design.
LO 5
THINKING AND REASONINGThe learner is able to use language to think and reason, and access, process and use information for learning.
We know this when the learner:
5.1 uses language to think and reason:
5.1.1 infers and deduces meaning, and explains the intentions of the author by interpreting written, visual and aural texts across the curriculum;
5.1.4 expresses and develops a clear personal viewpoint;
5.1.5 supports an argument with various kinds of evidence;
5.1.7 uses appropriate language structures to express complex thought;
5.3 processes information:
5.3.1 records information in an accessible format (e.g. lists, mind maps, notes, summaries);
5.3.3 changes information from one format into another (e.g. mind map into paragraph, list into summary);
5.3.4 reflects critically by sharing and challenging ideas;
5.3.5 compares different points of view, and identifies differences and similarities.
 
Table 12
LO 6
LANGUAGE STRUCTURE AND USEThe learner is able to use the sounds, words and grammar of the language to create and interpret texts.
We know this when the learner:
6.1 works with words:
6.1.2 creates personal spelling list and dictionary of words across the curriculum;
6.1.3 uses the dictionary and thesaurus to increase vocabulary and improve spelling;
6.4 develops awareness and use of style:
6.4.2 distinguishes between formal and informal language;
6.6 uses meta-language (e.g. talks about simple, compound and complex sentences).

Memorandum

Slanguage

Just ensure that the language ‘offered’ by the children, is socially acceptable language !

Table 13
‘spaced out’ : to be preoccupied / on a high ‘barf’ : to throw up or vomit ‘grass’ or ‘pot’ : dagga ‘split’ : to leave suddenly
‘hangup’ : to have a problem ‘pooped’ : exhausted something is cool : accepted, good or fine ‘fuzz’ : the police
‘rip-off’ : to be cheated out of something ‘stoned’ : to be on drugs o: Taboo LanguageA very, very useful task. Do not be afraid to investigate this type of language. The children will, naturally, find it very enjoyable to be able to discuss this ‘taboo’ subject.r narcotics ‘bread’ : slang for ‘money’ or cash grub : food

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A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

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Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

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