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    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Languages (Gr. 4-6)
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Choosing the correct words

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

Grade 6

Module 5

CHOOSING THE CORRECT WORDS

1. Seven great wonders

The Egyptian master–builder, Imhotep, built the first pyramid for his Pharaoh, Zoser, in C. 2778 B.C. The Great Pyramids of Giza – the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still to be seen, later dwarfed it. Each pyramid is made up of 2.3 million blocks of stone, weighing about 5,7 million ton in total. Khufu’s Pyramid, also known as Cheops, the biggest of them all, was originally 147 m high (it is now 137 m).

The other six wonders were much smaller than the Great Pyramids. But each, built between 600 and 270 B.C, was a spectacular achievement of engineering and art for its time.

Read more about these and other wonders in the amazing book The Big Book of Man-Made Wonders by Brian Williams, published by Hamlyn.

Take a careful look at the words in the table above and then match them to the buildings shown on the following page.

Table 1
Answer Building Answer Building
  Stonehenge   Eiffel Tower
  Skyscraper   Pyramid
  Observatory   Sydney Opera House
  Statue of Liberty   Leaning Tower of Pisa

Write your answers in the space provided by choosing the correct letter to match the words in the table.

Figure 1
Figure 1 (Picture 3.png)
Table 2
LO 3.8.2  

Now complete the sentences below by writing the correct ‘building’ words in the space provided.

1. _______________is the most famous prehistoric monument of standing stones and is found on Salisbury Plain in England.

2. The ___________________was built for the 1889 Paris Exhibition to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the French Revolution.

3. Manhattan Island in New York City has more _____________than any other city section in the world.

4. From toe to torch the ____________________ is 46 m tall and beneath her flowing robes is a steel frame designed by Gustav Eiffel.

Figure 2
Figure 2 (Picture 4.png)

Figure 3
Figure 3 (Picture 5.png)
Read the three pieces about MAN-MADE WONDERS that follow.

What you need to do

  • After reading each one, highlight the main idea in each paragraph.
  • Write a summary of each piece answering the following questions: what? where? who? why? amazing?
Table 3
LO 3.8.1  

2. Amazing buildings

View from the moon

The Great Wall of China is the longest structure ever built. It is made up of stone walls and earthworks, and with branches at various points, may once have been 9 000 km long. Most of the basic wall is a stone rampart 9 m high with a road along the top. Every 60 m or so there is a watch tower 12 m high, from where guards lit fires to send signals along the wall.

The Great Wall of China was built to guard against attacks by Turkic and Mongol tribesmen in the third century B.C. The Chinese call it the longest graveyard in the world because of the approximately one million convicts who died during its construction.

The Great Wall of China, most stupendous structure ever built by man, is the only man-made object that can be seen from the moon with the naked eye!

….. because I love you …..

In 1629 Mumtaz Mahal, favourite wife of the Mogul ruler of India, died in childbirth. The emperor Shah Jahan ordered the most beautiful tomb in the world for his wife.

Twenty thousand labourers and artists worked for 20 years to complete the Taj Mahal. The domed building is of white marble, resting on a red sandstone platform. At each corner is a minaret 40 m high. The Taj Mahal is often called the most beautiful building in the world. Many tourists from all over the world go to see its beauty. Each of the building’s four faces is identical and quiet pools reflect its perfect proportions.

The dome rises almost 61 m above the floor. Below this is the vault in which Shah Jahan and his wife are buried. The Shah rests in peace beside his beloved wife.

We’re going to America!

Auguste Bartholdi, a Frenchman, designed the Statue of Liberty. Inside the beautiful lady is a steel framework designed by Gustav Eiffel, also a Frenchman, who designed the Eiffel Tower.

The face of Liberty is that of sculptor Auguste Bartholdi’s mother. The flowing robes are made of 300 copper sheets and inside the statue is a spiral staircase with 142 steps. At the top, the observation platform in Liberty’s crown can accomodate up to 20 people. Her glowing torch is 6,4 m high and from toe to torch the statue is 46 m tall. It is hollow inside, while the iron frame is strong but flexible. It allows the statue’s copper skin to react to wind and change of temperature without putting the ironwork under stress. The statue has given many immigrants their first sight of the New World.

The Statue of Liberty is probably the world’s most famous statue and stands on Liberty Island in New York Harbour.

Table 4
LO 3.1.2  

Amazing buildings: summaries

Remember to answer the questions WHAT?WHERE?WHO?WHY? and AMAZING?

View from the moon

Because I love you …..

We’re going to America!

Table 5
LO 3.7.3  

Wow! By now you must be thinking, “What an amazing world we live in!” And we haven’t really even begun to talk about NATURE or IMAGINATION!

Now put your heads together and get more than dandruff!

What?

  • Make a group decision about what amazing MAN-MADE WONDER your group will research. It may be one of the wonders already mentioned in this module, or any other.
  • Give each member a specific task, e.g. pictures/books/Internet info.
  • Plan your presentation. EVERY member must have a chance to speak.
  • You may make a poster or have pictures/photos to pass around.
  • Just a suggestion: you might like to play some music in the background, e.g. Italian music for Leaning Tower of Pisa.
  • Give an AMAZING presentation to the class. (Minimum 3 minutes – maximum 4 minutes.)
Table 6
LO 2.2.1  
LO 2.2.2  
LO 2.2.3  

Assessment

Table 7
LO 2
SPEAKINGThe speaker is able to communicate effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.
We know this when the learner:
2.1 communicates experiences, more complex ideas and information in more challenging contexts, for different audiences and purposes:2.1.2 uses language for creative and imaginative self-expression (e.g. poems, response to music);2.1.4 asks and responds to challenging questions;2.2 applies interaction skills in group situations:2.2.1 follows conventions for appropriate interaction in group work;2.2.2 gives balanced and constructive feedback;2.2.3 shows sensitivity to cultural and social differences (e.g. affirms and incorporates diverse language, experiences, examples);
Learning Outcomes(LOs)
 
LO 3
READING AND VIEWINGThe learner is able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and to respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.
We know this when the learner:
3.1 reads and responds critically to a variety of South African and international fiction and non-fiction (journals, poetry, novels, short plays, newspapers, textbooks, etc.):
3.1.1 reads aloud and silently, adjusting reading strategies to suit the purpose and audience;
3.1.2 uses appropriate reading and comprehension strategies (skimming, and scanning, predictions, contextual clues, inferences, monitoring comprehension, etc.);
3.7 identifies and critically discusses cultural and social values in texts:
3.7.3 discusses the diversity of social and cultural values in texts;
3.8 understands and uses information texts appropriately:
3.8.1 summarises main and supporting ideas;
3.8.2 selects and records relevant information appropriately;
3.9 interprets and analyses independently details in graphical texts (maps, line graphs, bar graphs and pie charts) and transfers information from one form to another.

Memorandum

4. Seven great wonders

Table 8
Answer Building
C Stonehenge
E Skyscraper
F Observatory
G Statue of Liberty
D Eiffel Tower
A Pyramid
H Sydney Opera House
B Learning Tower of Pisa

1. Stonehenge

2. Eiffel Tower

3. skyscrapers

4. Statue of Liberty

5. Amazing buildings: summaries

a) View from the moon

  • Great Wall of China
  • China
  • Chinese emperors
  • To guard against attacks by Turks and Mongols
  • Can be seen from the moon with the naked eye.

b) Because I love you…

  • The Taj Mahal
  • India
  • Emperor Shah Hahan
  • As a burial vault for his beloved wife
  • Often described as the most beautiful building on earth

c) We’re going to America!

  • Statue of Liberty
  • Liberty Island in NY Harbour
  • Designed by Auguste Bartholdi
  • Statue (expresses idea of freedom)
  • (Probably) world’s most famous statue.

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